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Conference shares latest youth development research

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By Olivia M. Hall from the Cornell Chronicle:

burrow presenting

Runaway slaves, social media, environmental education, the wisdom of elders – the sixth annual Youth Development Research Update June 1-2 in Ithaca covered a lot of ground.

Funded by the Bronfenbrenner Center for Translational Research (BCTR) in the College of Human Ecology, the conference brought together 55 Cornell Cooperative Extension educators and program leaders, youth service providers from community agencies and Cornell faculty members from across campus to explore how these and other topics relate to children and teens and how to better serve their needs.

“This event creates a unique, interactive space for practitioners and researchers to engage in sustained dialogue about ongoing research and the potential for future collaboration,” said assistant professor of human development Anthony Burrow, who organized the event with Jutta Dotterweich, director of training for BCTR’s ACT for Youth project.

Stephanie Graf, a Youth and Family Program leader with Jefferson County Extension, has developed several fruitful partnerships over five years of attending the conference. For a past project on Defiant Gardens for military families, for example, she worked with professor of natural resources Marianne Krasny, who this year spoke about environmental education programs to support positive youth development.

Krasny outlined how environmental stewardship activities have potential to stimulate positive growth in young people, leading to healthier physical habits, skills for future employment or greater self-confidence and emotional self-regulation. Educators, meanwhile, face the challenge of guiding youth without overly imposing their own experiences and decision-making – a dilemma for which she suggested a reflective practice of providing structure, support, mutual learning, open communication and ultimate accountability. “Positive youth development is possible,” she said, “but it’s not easy.”

Graf found research by Christopher Wildeman, associate professor of policy analysis and management and a BCTR faculty fellow, on the stigma associated with parental incarceration to be equally relevant to her work, where she sometimes encounters children of inmates in her county’s after-school programs.

Wildeman reviewed research on the United States’ historically high rate of incarceration – which at 500 prisoners per 100,000 citizens far outstrips other developed democracies – and its disproportionately negative impact on minority families. He then described a new experimental study in which teachers, presented with hypothetical students new to their classroom, expected more behavioral problems and less competence from children whose fathers are in prison. These results support the “sticky stigma” attached to paternal incarceration, Wildeman said.

History professor Edward Baptist drew a link from Wildeman’s talk when discussing his Freedom on the Move project. “I think that mass incarceration probably wouldn’t exist and certainly wouldn’t have the shape that it does without the strategies that were created to try to control and continue to force people into the institution of slavery,” Baptist said.

One such strategy was for slave masters to place runaway slave ads in newspapers, reinforcing the persistent scrutiny under which even free African-Americans found themselves. Collaborating with colleagues at Cornell and other universities, Baptist has built a crowdsourcing platform that will engage the public in transcribing and parsing data from some 200,000 ads that survive from the period between 1722 and 1865.

A poster session on the Program for Research on Youth Development and Engagement (PRYDE) concluded the conference, allowing attendees to question researchers about work in its four focus areas: healthy transitions for adolescents; intergenerational connections between high schoolers and older adults; the productive use of social media; and leveraging youth purpose to increase engagement and learning in 4-H.

Burrow, PRYDE co-director, said: “The update provides a rare space for researchers to attend a conference alongside needed collaborators. It’s like having your cake and eating it, too.”

Conference shares latest youth development research - Cornell Chronicle

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Register for the 2016 Youth Development Research Update

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Group discussion at 2015 Youth Development Research Update

Each year, the Youth Development Research Update creates a forum for practitioners and Cornell University researchers to discuss issues relevant to the well-being and development of children and adolescents. Together we will ask:

  • How can practitioners use research findings for interventions or practices that benefit young people within various social settings?
  • Which questions emerge from the field that researchers have not explored and need to address?

Registration is now open for the 2016 event.

Sixth Annual Youth Development Research Update

June 1-2, 2016
La Tourelle Inn ~ 1150 Danby Road ~ Ithaca, NY 14850

Day 1 - Wednesday, June 1, 2016

1:00pm - Welcome and Introductions
1:30pm - Research Presentation: Christopher Wildeman
2:45pm - Research Presentation: Marianne E. Krasny
3:45pm - Roundtable Discussions
4:30pm - Adjourn

Day 2 - Thursday, June 2, 2016

9:00am - Welcome Back and Refreshments
9:15am - Introducing the Program for Research on Youth Development and Engagement (PRYDE)
9:30am - Poster Session: PRYDE Projects

10:30am - Break
10:45am - Large Group Discussion: PRYDE Projects
11:30am - Roundtable Discussions
12:00pm - Lunch and Networking
1:00pm - Research Presentation: Edward E. Baptist
2:00pm - Final Roundtable Discussions and Wrap-up
3:00pm - Adjourn

Full talk descriptions are available on the registration form.

Registration is required and space is limited, so please register as soon as possible. There is no deadline, but registration will close once capacity is met. Please download and complete the registration form and mail it with payment to:

Amy Breese
ACT for Youth Center of Excellence
Cornell University
Bronfenbrenner Center for Translational Research – Beebe Hall
Ithaca, NY 14853

Contact Amy with questions at act4youth@cornell.edu or 607-255-7736.

Conference registration and lunch are provided at $60. Participants are responsible for hotel and travel arrangements and expenses. For the group rate of $109, reserve rooms with the La Tourelle Inn by April 29, 2016, and reference Cornell ACT for Youth/BCTR.

La Tourelle Inn
1150 Danby Road
Ithaca, NY 14850
800-765-1492

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New systematic reviews on 4-H public speaking programs and volunteer engagement

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How can 4-H youth programs improve volunteer recruitment and retention? What is the impact of 4-H public speaking programs? The latest BCTR systematic translational reviews (STRs) address these questions. These topics were proposed to the BCTR Research Synthesis Project as questions that needed addressing with the best existing research available in order to strengthen 4-H programming and improve volunteer engagement and retention.

The Impact of 4-H Public Speaking Programs STR reports that there seem to be some positive outcomes from youth participation in public speaking programs, but more rigorous research is needed to confirm these findings.

The Volunteer Motivation STR finds that when volunteers’ experiences are more closely connected to their initial motivations to give time, they may be more likely to sign up and stay on in a volunteer role.

The BCTR Research Synthesis Project supports the development of high-quality evidence summaries on topics nominated by practitioners and faculty within the Cornell Cooperative Extension system to illuminate the evidence base for their work.

To meet this need, the Systematic Translational Review (STR) process was developed to provide replicable systems and protocols for conducting timely and trustworthy research syntheses. STRs include the systematic features of a traditional review, the speed of a rapid review, and the inclusion of practitioner expertise to help guide search parameters and identify appropriate sources. By drawing upon both practitioner wisdom and the best available empirical evidence, the STR process supports the translation of evidence to practice in real-world settings.

A full listing of past STRs can be found here.

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Youth research updates on gossip, children of prisoners, and minority participation in STEM

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Group discussion at the 2015 YDRU

The BCTR's annual Youth Development Research Update (YDRU) brings together 4-H educators, Cornell Cooperative Extension county leaders, and others in New York State affiliated with youth programs with Cornell researchers. At this year's YDRU, held in early June,  researchers presented on gossip and aggression, the effects of parental incarceration on children, racial and ethnic minority youth engagement in STEM, and the influence of class on cohabitation choices. Jutta Dotterweich (director of training and technical assistance, ACT for Youth Project) and Stephen Hamilton organized the event.

In a Cornell Chronicle article, Jacqueline Davis-Manigaulte ’72, a Cornell Cooperative Extension-New York City senior extension associate, describes the importance of the YDRU,

This event allows us to hear about the latest Cornell faculty research on youth development. But what I really enjoy is the powerful connections we make with faculty members who see the value in working with us on projects. It gives us a direct line to potential partners.

In addition to talks by researchers, the YDRU features group discussions and unstructured time for participants to talk. Giving these generally institutionally separated groups access to each other allows for discussions leading to stronger, more relevant research and more effective, evidence-based programming for youth.

This year's presentations were:

  • Steven E. Alvarado (Sociology): Racial and Ethnic Minorities in STEM: Challenges and Opportunities for Advancement
  • Anna R. Haskins (Sociology): Paternal Incarceration and Children's Early Educational Outcomes
  • Sharon Sassler (Policy Analysis and Management): Social Class Differences in Relationship Processes and the Entry into Cohabitation
  • Dawn E. Schrader (Communication): Everybody Talks: Forms and Functions of Gossip and Talk in Adolescent Female Social Aggression

Talks connect faculty, youth-focused extension partners - Cornell Chronicle

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Register now for 2015 Youth Development Research Update

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Each year, the Youth Development Research Update creates a forum for practitioners and Cornell University researchers to discuss issues relevant to the well-being and development of children and adolescents. Together we will ask:

  • How can practitioners use research findings for interventions or practices that benefit young people within various social settings?
  • Which questions emerge from the field that researchers have not explored and need to address?

Day 1 - Tuesday, June 2, 2015, 1:00 - 6:30 p.m.

  • 1:00 Welcome and Introductions
  • 1:30 Research Presentation: Dawn E. Schrader - Communication: Everybody Talks: Forms and Functions of Gossip and Talk in Adolescent Female Social Aggression
  • 2:30 Roundtable Discussions
  • 3:00 Panel Discussion: Special Tribute to Professor Steve Hamilton (We will be joined by several of Steve’s former students and colleagues for the panel and reception)
  • 5:00 Reception in honor of Professor Steve Hamilton

 Day 2 - Wednesday, June 3, 2015, 9:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.

  • 9:00 Welcome Back and Refreshments
  • 9:15 Research Presentation: Steven E. Alvarado - Sociology: Racial and Ethnic Minorities in STEM: Challenges and Opportunities for Advancement
  • 10:30 Research Presentation: Sharon Sassler - Policy Analysis and Management: Social Class Differences in Relationship Processes and the Entry into Cohabitation
  • 11:30 Roundtable Discussions
  • 12:00 Lunch and Networking
  • 1:00 Research Presentation: Anna R. Haskins - Sociology: Paternal Incarceration and Children's Early Educational Outcomes
  • 2:00 Final Roundtable Discussions and Wrap-up

Full talk descriptions are available on the registration form.

Registration is required and space is limited, so please register as soon as possible. There is no deadline, but registration will close once capacity is met. Please download and complete the registration form and mail it with payment to:

Amy Breese
ACT for Youth Center of Excellence
Cornell University
Bronfenbrenner Center for Translational Research – Beebe Hall
Ithaca, NY 14853

Contact Amy with questions at act4youth@cornell.edu or 607-255-7736.

Conference registration and lunch are provided at $60. Participants are responsible for hotel and travel arrangements and expenses. For the group rate of $99, reserve rooms with the La Tourelle Inn by May 2, 2015, and reference the Youth Development Conference.

La Tourelle Inn
1150 Danby Road
Ithaca, NY 14850
800-765-1492

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Experts offer new findings on youth at research update

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Each year the BCTR sponsors the Youth Development Research Update to present and discuss the latest research in youth development. This June 3-4 Cornell researchers gathered with Cornell Cooperative Extension (CCE) county leaders, 4-H educators, and community partners for the fourth annual research update.

In a Cornell Chronicle article about the event, Stephen Hamilton, BCTR Associate Director for Youth Development, describes the event's purpose:

The research update informs practitioners about research-based knowledge they can draw on in their work... It fosters dialogue that enables researchers to understand what is most important and most useful to practitioners and ultimately for both to find common ground for collaboration.

In addition to an update on pilot trainings by Jutta Dotterweich, the following talks presented new research:

  • Robert Sternberg, Human Development: Beyond IQ: Assessing students for creative, analytical, practical, wisdom-based, and ethical skills
  • Nancy Wells, Design and Environmental Analysis: Findings from a research - extension partnership: The effects of school gardens on children’s diet and physical activity
  • Natalie Bazarova, Communications: Self-disclosure of personal information in social media
  • Travis Gosa, Africana Studies: Does hip-hop really belong in schools? Reframing hip-hop as critical pedagogy
  • Lorraine Maxwell, Design and Environmental Analysis: The role of the physical environment in child and adolescent self-efficacy

Experts offer new findings on youth at research update - Cornell Chronicle

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Register now for 2014 Youth Development Research Update

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Each year, the Youth Development Research Update creates a forum for practitioners and Cornell University researchers to discuss issues relevant to the well-being and development of children and adolescents. Research presentations will be followed by ample time for participant questions. Throughout the event, roundtable discussions will provide practitioners an opportunity to reflect on the presented material. Together we will ask:

  • How can practitioners use research findings for interventions or practices that benefit young people within various social settings?
  • Which questions emerge from the field that researchers have not explored and need to address?

Day 1 - Tuesday, June 3, 2014
1:00 - 4:30 p.m.

  • Welcome and Introductions
  • Research Presentation: Robert Sternberg, Human Development: Beyond IQ: Assessing students for creative, analytical, practical, wisdom-based, and ethical skills
  • Research Presentation: Nancy Wells, Design and Environmental Analysis: Findings from a research - extension partnership: The effects of school gardens on children’s diet and physical activity
  • Roundtable Discussions

Day 2 - Wednesday, June 4, 2014
9:00 a.m. - 3:30 p.m.

  • Welcome Back and Refreshments
  • Research Presentation: Natalie Bazarova, Communications: Self-disclosure of personal information in social media
  • Research Presentation: Travis Gosa, Africana Studies: Does hip-hop really belong in schools? Reframing hip-hop as critical pedagogy
  • Roundtable Discussions
  • Lunch and Networking
  • Update: Jutta Dotterweich, Bronfenbrenner Center for Translational Research: Positive Youth Development 101: Findings from the pilot trainings and next steps
  • Research Presentation: Lorraine Maxwell, Design and Environmental Analysis: The role of the physical environment in child and adolescent self-efficacy
  • Final Roundtable Discussions and Wrap-up

Full talk descriptions are available on the registration form.

Registration is required and space is limited, so please register as soon as possible. There is no deadline, but registration will close once capacity is met. Please download and complete the registration form and mail it with payment to:

Amy Breese
ACT for Youth Center of Excellence
Cornell University
Bronfenbrenner Center for Translational Research – Beebe Hall
Ithaca, NY 14853

Contact Amy with questions at act4youth@cornell.edu or 607-255-7736.

Conference registration and lunch are provided at $60. Participants are responsible for hotel and travel arrangements and expenses. For the group rate of $99, reserve rooms with the LaTourelle Inn by May 2, 2014, and reference the Youth Development Conference.

La Tourelle Inn
1150 Danby Road
Ithaca, NY 14850
800-765-1492

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2013 Youth Development Research Update registration open

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Each year, the Youth Development Research Update creates a forum for practitioners and Cornell University researchers to discuss issues relevant to the well-being and development of children and adolescents. Research presentations will be followed by ample time for participant questions. Throughout the event, roundtable discussions will provide practitioners an opportunity to reflect on the presented material. Together we will ask:

  • How can practitioners use research findings for interventions or practices that benefit young people within various social settings?
  • Which questions emerge from the field that researchers have not explored and need to address?

Day 1 - Tuesday, June 4, 2013, 1:00 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.

  • Opening Remarks
  • Research presentation: David Brewer (Employment & Disability Institute, ILR)
    Critical Program Elements in Transition to Adulthood for Youth with Disabilities in New York State
  • Research presentation: Lee Humphreys (Communication)
    Privacy Tensions on Social Media
  • Round table discussions

Day 2 - Wednesday, June 5, 2013, 9:00 a.m. – 3:30 p.m.

  • Welcome back
  • Research Presentation: Thomas Hirschl (Developmental Sociology)
    A Life Course Perspective on Non-Metro vs. Metro Poverty and Educational Attainment in the Transition to Adulthood in the United States (1980-2009)
  • Research Presentation: Wendy M. Williams (Human Development)
    Introduction to the Cornell Institute for Women in Science
  • Roundtable discussions
  • Lunch and networking
  • Research Presentation: Valerie N. Adams-Bass (NYS 4H, BCTR)
    That’s Not Me I See On TV: African American Youth Interpret Images of Black Females
  • Final roundtable discussions
  • Evaluation and wrap-up

Registration is required and space is limited, so please register as soon as possible. There is no deadline, but registration will close once capacity is met. Please download and complete the registration form and mail it with payment to:

Amy Breese
ACT for Youth Center of Excellence
Cornell University
Bronfenbrenner Center for Translational Research – Beebe Hall
Ithaca, NY 14853

Contact Amy with questions at act4youth@cornell.edu or 607-255-7736.

Conference registration and lunch are provided at $60. Participants are responsible for hotel and travel arrangements and expenses. For the group rate of $99, reserve rooms with the LaTourelle Inn by May 4, 2013, and reference the Youth Development Conference.

La Tourelle Inn
1150 Danby Road
Ithaca, NY 14850
800-765-1492

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2013 Youth Development Research Update, Wednesday, June 5, 2013

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bctrlogo

Youth Development Research Update
Various speakers

Wednesday, June 5, 2013
9:00 AM - 3:30 PM
La Tourelle Inn, Ithaca



Each year, the Youth Development Research Update creates a forum for practitioners and Cornell University researchers to discuss issues relevant to the well-being and development of children and adolescents. Research presentations will be followed by ample time for participant questions. Throughout the event, roundtable discussions will provide practitioners an opportunity to reflect on the presented material. Together we will ask:

  • How can practitioners use research findings for interventions or practices that benefit young people within various social settings?
  • Which questions emerge from the field that researchers have not explored and need to address?

Day 1 - Tuesday, June 4, 2013, 1:00 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.

  • Opening Remarks
  • Research presentation: David Brewer (Employment & Disability Institute, ILR)
    Critical Program Elements in Transition to Adulthood for Youth with Disabilities in New York State
  • Research presentation: Lee Humphreys (Communication)
    Privacy Tensions on Social Media
  • Round table discussions

Day 2 - Wednesday, June 5, 2013, 9:00 a.m. – 3:30 p.m.

  • Welcome back
  • Research Presentation: Thomas Hirschl (Developmental Sociology)
    A Life Course Perspective on Non-Metro vs. Metro Poverty and Educational Attainment in the Transition to Adulthood in the United States (1980-2009)
  • Research Presentation: Wendy M. Williams (Human Development)
    Introduction to the Cornell Institute for Women in Science
  • Roundtable discussions
  • Lunch and networking
  • Research Presentation: Valerie N. Adams-Bass (NYS 4H, BCTR)
    That’s Not Me I See On TV: African American Youth Interpret Images of Black Females
  • Final roundtable discussions
  • Evaluation and wrap-up

Location:
La Tourelle Inn

1150 Danby Road
Ithaca, NY 14850
800-765-1492

Registration for this event is now closed. Current registrants with event questions may contact Amy Breese at act4youth@cornell.edu or 607-255-7736.

This event is sponsored by the Bronfenbrenner Center for Translational Research.

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2013 Youth Development Research Update, Tuesday, June 4, 2013

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Third Annual Youth Development Research Update
Various speakers

Tuesday, June 4, 2013
1:00-4:30 PM
La Tourelle Inn, Ithaca



Each year, the Youth Development Research Update creates a forum for practitioners and Cornell University researchers to discuss issues relevant to the well-being and development of children and adolescents. Research presentations will be followed by ample time for participant questions. Throughout the event, roundtable discussions will provide practitioners an opportunity to reflect on the presented material. Together we will ask:

  • How can practitioners use research findings for interventions or practices that benefit young people within various social settings?
  • Which questions emerge from the field that researchers have not explored and need to address?

Day 1 - Tuesday, June 4, 2013, 1:00 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.

  • Opening Remarks
  • Research presentation: David Brewer (Employment & Disability Institute, ILR)
    Critical Program Elements in Transition to Adulthood for Youth with Disabilities in New York State
  • Research presentation: Lee Humphreys (Communication)
    Privacy Tensions on Social Media
  • Round table discussions

Day 2 - Wednesday, June 5, 2013, 9:00 a.m. – 3:30 p.m.

  • Welcome back
  • Research Presentation: Thomas Hirschl (Developmental Sociology)
    A Life Course Perspective on Non-Metro vs. Metro Poverty and Educational Attainment in the Transition to Adulthood in the United States (1980-2009)
  • Research Presentation: Wendy M. Williams (Human Development)
    Introduction to the Cornell Institute for Women in Science
  • Roundtable discussions
  • Lunch and networking
  • Research Presentation: Valerie N. Adams-Bass (NYS 4H, BCTR)
    That’s Not Me I See On TV: African American Youth Interpret Images of Black Females
  • Final roundtable discussions
  • Evaluation and wrap-up

Location:
La Tourelle Inn

1150 Danby Road
Ithaca, NY 14850
800-765-1492

Registration for this event is now closed. Current registrants with event questions may contact Amy Breese at act4youth@cornell.edu or 607-255-7736.

This event is sponsored by the Bronfenbrenner Center for Translational Research.

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