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Marriage is good for your health…especially if you’re a man

Tags: health,   Karl Pillemer,   marriage,   media mention,   tv,   video,  

homeslider-2015-pillemer-foxandfriends3It's well established by research that being married extends your life expectancy, improves your psychological well-being, and lowers your risk for heart disease and cancer. A new study from the Institute of Education at University College London confirms these positive outcomes for married people and finds that married men fare even better than married women.

BCTR director Karl Pillemer appeared on Fox & Friends to comment on these findings. In the interview he notes that, generally, unmarried women live healthier lives than unmarried men and that, in marriage, the healthier women influence the unhealthier men in a positive way. The study looked at data from 2002-2004 and included only heterosexual marriages.

Study finds marriage is good for your health - Fox & Friends (video)

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Affiliate Anthony Burrow talks about purpose on “Through the Wormhole”


news-burrow-inpostAnthony Burrow, assistant professor of human development and BCTR faculty affiliate, studies the role of purpose in the lives of young people and how and to what extent a sense of purpose can promote positive adjustment outcomes. He is a 2012 BCTR pilot grant recipient for his study Intervening on Purpose and Meaning in Adolescence and has delivered a BCTR Talk at Twelve and a presentation at our annual Youth Development Research Update on the subject.

A recent episode of Through the Wormhole, a program on the Science Channel hosted by Morgan Freeman, features Burrow discussing the motivations for his work and why this area of research holds great promise for promoting healthy lives. The full episode wonders Are We Here for a Reason? Burrow's segment begins at 38:57. The full episode can be viewed for a fee on YouTube.

Through the Wormhole: Are We Here for a Reason? - YouTube

(1) Comment.  |   Tags: Anthony Burrow    faculty affiliate    media mention    video    youth   

Ron Haskins to deliver 2015 Bronfenbrenner Lecture


The BCTR is pleased to announce that Ron Haskins of the Brookings Institution will deliver this year's Bronfenbrenner Lecture on September 16. His recent book, Show Me the Evidence: Obama's Fight for Rigor and Results in Social Policy, tells the story of how the Obama administration planned and enacted several initiatives to fund social programs based on rigorous evidence of success and thereby created a fundamental change in the role of evidence in federal policymaking. Here he discusses the book:

Ron Haskins is a senior fellow in the Economic Studies program and co-director of the Center on Children and Families at the Brookings Institution and senior consultant at the Annie E. Casey Foundation in Baltimore. From February to December of 2002 he was the senior advisor to the president for welfare policy at the White House.

Prior to joining Brookings and Casey, he spent 14 years on the staff of the House Ways and Means Human Resources Subcommittee, first as welfare counsel to the Republican staff, then as the subcommittee’s staff director. From 1981-1985, he was a senior researcher at the Frank Porter Graham Child Development Center at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. He also taught and lectured on history and education at UNC, Charlotte and developmental psychology at Duke University.

Haskins was the editor of the 1996, 1998, and 2000 editions of the Green Book, a 1600-page compendium of the nation’s social programs published by the House Ways and Means Committee that analyzes domestic policy issues including health care, poverty, and unemployment. Haskins is a senior editor of The Future of Children, a journal on policy issues that affect children and families. He has also co-edited several books, including Welfare Reform and Beyond: The Future of the Safety Net (2002), The New World of Welfare (2001) and Policies for America’s Public Schools: Teachers, Equity, and Indicators (Ablex, 1988), and is a contributor to numerous edited books and scholarly journals on children’s development and social policy issues. He is also the author of Show Me the Evidence (2014), Work Over Welfare: The Inside Story of the 1996 Welfare Reform Law (2006) and the co-author of Creating an Opportunity Society (2009) with Isabel Sawhill and Getting Ahead or Losing Ground: Economic Mobility in America (Pew, 2008). He has appeared frequently on radio and television and has written articles and editorials for several newspapers and periodicals including the Washington Post, New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Policy Review, State Government News, American Enterprise, National Review, and the Weekly Standard.

His areas of expertise include welfare reform, child care, child support, marriage, child protection, and budget and deficit issues. In 1997, Haskins was selected by the National Journal as one of the 100 most influential people in the federal government. He received a Lifetime Achievement Award from the Federal Office of Child Support Enforcement (2000); the President’s Award for Outstanding Contributions to the Field of Human Services from the American Public Human Services Association (2005); and the Lion Award from the Grantmakers for Children, Youth, and Families (2010).

He holds a Bachelor’s degree in History, a Master’s in Education, and a Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology, from UNC, Chapel Hill. Haskins, who was a noncommissioned officer in the United States Marine Corps from 1963 to 1966, lives with his wife in Rockville, Maryland and is the father of four grown children.

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Webinar on “Delivering Extension Programs to the City” now online

Tags: CUCE-NYC,   Jennifer Tiffany,   video,   webinar,  

news-tiffany2-inpostJennifer Tiffany, executive director of Cornell University Cooperative Extension's NYC (CUCE-NYC') programs and the BCTR's director of outreach and community engagement presented a webinar on urban extension as part of the Smith-Lever Centennial Webinar Series sponsored by the National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA). The April 7th webinar, Delivering Extension Programs to the City, discussed CUCE-NYC's programs and program strategies as a case study. The webinar is now available online here.

Over 80% of the U.S. population lives in urban areas, making effective urban extension programs an essential element of cooperative extension’s work. New and innovative programs that benefit city dwellers also benefit cooperative extension as a system by engaging highly diverse urban residents as staff members, collaborators, and program participants, and by creating opportunities for community-informed research and innovation.

Eighty-five individuals and groups from as far away as Alaska and Hawaii joined the presentation, along with attendees on site at NIFA's offices in Washington, DC. The webinar was organized by NIFA program leader Marty Draper and hosted by NIFA program specialist Ahlishia Shipley, who noted:

Extension plays a critical role engaging communities, forming essential partnerships, and addressing issues unique to urban populations and environments through research-based programs and resources.

 Delivering Extension Programs to the City - webinar recording

(0) Comments.  |   Tags: CUCE-NYC    Jennifer Tiffany    video    webinar   

2015 John Doris Memorial Lecture, Saturday, September 21, 2019

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2015 John Doris Memorial Lecture

Implementation Research in State Systems for Children with Behavioral Health Needs
Tuesday, April 14, 2015

Kimberly Eaton Hoagwood
School of Medicine, New York University


Implementation Research in State Systems for Children with Behavioral Health Needs
Tuesday, April 14, 2015

Kimberly Eaton Hoagwood
School of Medicine, New York University

(0) Comments.  |   Tags: John Doris Memorial Lecture    video   

Garbarino’s “Listening to Killers” Talk at Twelve video online


news-garbarino-inpostFor twenty years James Garbarino has served as a psychological expert witness in criminal and civil cases involving issues of trauma, violence, and children. A former student of Urie Bronfenbrenner's, his approach is to consider the ways developmental processes are shaped by the human ecology in which they occur. On February 9 Garbarino delivered a BCTR Talk at Twelve based on his recent book, Listening to Killers: Lessons Learned from My Twenty Years as a Psychological Expert Witness in Murder Cases. In his talk he recounted specific stories from killers' lives and crimes, serving to demonstrate the ways that untreated early emotional and moral damage can create violent adults. Video from the talk, Listening to Killers: Bringing Developmental Psychology into the Courtroom in Murder Cases, is now available to view online on our YouTube channel, and is embedded below.

In a Cornell Chronicle story about this work and the talk, Garbarino noted,

Most killers should be understood as traumatized children who inhabit and control the minds, hearts and bodies of adult men.

James Garbarino is a Cornell professor emeritus of human development and the Maude C. Clarke Chair in Humanistic Psychology at Loyola University in Chicago.

Garbarino book goes inside the minds of murderers - Cornell Chronicle

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Talks at Twelve: James Garbarino, Saturday, September 21, 2019

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Talks at Twelve: James Garbarino

Listening to Killers: Bringing Developmental Psychology into the Courtroom in Murder Cases
Thursday, February 9, 2015

James Garbarino
Psychology, Loyola University Chicago


Listening to Killers: Bringing Developmental Psychology into the Courtroom in Murder Cases
Thursday, February 9, 2015

James Garbarino
Psychology, Loyola University Chicago

(0) Comments.  |   Tags: BCTR Talks at Twelve    criminal justice    James Garbarino    psychology    video   

Talks at Twelve: Christopher Wildeman, Saturday, September 21, 2019

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Talks at Twelve: Christopher Wildeman

Children of the Prison Boom: Mass Incarceration and the Future of American Inequality
Tuesday, January 27, 2014

Christopher Wildeman
Policy Analysis & Management, Cornell University


Children of the Prison Boom: Mass Incarceration and the Future of American Inequality
Tuesday, January 27, 2014

Christopher Wildeman
Policy Analysis & Management, Cornell University

(0) Comments.  |   Tags: BCTR Talks at Twelve    children    incarceration    inequality    video   

New book: “Thirty Lessons for Loving” by Karl Pillemer

Tags: aging,   book,   Karl Pillemer,   marriage,   media mention,   publication,   video,  

news-pillemer-lessonsloving-inpost30 Lessons for Loving: Advice from the Wisest Americans on Love, Relationships, and Marriage uses data and stories from the most detailed survey of long-married people ever conducted to show the way to lifelong, fulfilling relationships. Author and incoming BCTR director Karl Pillemer presents this sage advice from the oldest and wisest Americans on everything from finding a partner, to deciding to commit, to growing old together. The new book, out in January, follows the success of Pillemer’s 30 Lessons for Living, which offered life advice across various areas (work, family, money,etc.). Pillemer is also Hazel E. Reed Professor in the Department of Human Development and Professor of Gerontology in Medicine at the Weill Cornell Medical College.

In an article in Cornell Alumni Magazine, Pillemer explains why advice from this group is so important and can be so helpful to younger generations,

They're looking back from the finish line; it's no longer a mystery how things are going to turn out. These are people who've been through just about everything that keeps young people awake at night, and they're still doing okay. They're living examples that a lot of what we worry about is actually resolvable—that with resilience, drive, and flexibility, you can still be happy, even though bad things sometimes happen to you.

The book is already garnering media attention, including an interview on CBS This Morning (video below). Pillemer will give a book talk on 30 Lessons for Loving on Wednesday, February 25th at 4:00pm in Room 160 Mann Library, Cornell campus.

The book trailer:

Pillemer on CBS This Morning

Secrets to a successful marriage from 700 retirees - CBS This Morning
Heart to heart - Cornell Alumni Magazine
It's never to late for love, according to gerontology research - Cornell Chronicle
Inside Cornell: Karl Pillemer's "30 Lessons for Loving" - CornellCast
The love advice that shocked expert Karl Pillemer - Huffington Post
Romantic advice from highly experienced practitioners - Sarasota Herald Tribune
Hundreds of retirees share secrets to a happy marriage - USA Today
Forget 'gray divorce': Here's how to make love last - The Wall Street Journal

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(0) Comments.  |   Tags: aging    book    Karl Pillemer    marriage    media mention    publication    video   

Talks at Twelve: Karl Pillemer, Saturday, September 21, 2019

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Talks at Twelve: Karl Pillemer

Resident-to-Resident Elder Mistreatment in Nursing Homes:  Findings from the First Prevalence Study
Thursday, October 23, 2014

Karl Pillemer
Human Development, Cornell University

Tags: abuse,   aging,   Karl Pillemer,   video,  

Resident-to-Resident Elder Mistreatment in Nursing Homes:  Findings from the First Prevalence Study
Thursday, October 23, 2014

Karl Pillemer
Human Development, Cornell University

(0) Comments.  |   Tags: abuse    aging    Karl Pillemer    video