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NBA’s Jarrett Allen visits 4-H coders

Tags: 4-H,   Alexa Maille,   media mention,   STEM,   technology,   tv,   video,  

By Sheri Hall for the BCTR

4-H participants in Brooklyn had a special visitor last month from NBA Star Jarrett Allen.

Allen, who has loved technology since he was a child, visited 4-Hers during a Code Your World activity, a 4-H program that teachers computer science. The event was featured on NBC’s Weekend Today news program.

“I want (these kids) to know that is a lot of opportunity out there for everybody, if you’re a kid, if you’re an adult,” he said on the news show. “Just take a passion that you love and spread it to other people, like I’m doing.”

Code Your World was last year’s 4-H National Youth Science Day project, designed to spark youth interest in computer science. More than 3,000 youth participated in the project – a four-part challenge that teaches kids ages 8 to 14 to apply computer science to the world around them through hands-on activities.

Code Your World was developed by Google and West Virginia University Extension Service. It includes a computer-based activity on Google’s CS First platform and three unplugged activities that bring coding to life through games and interaction.

As part of the program, Allen let kids “code” a basketball shot by letting them tell him how many steps to take in what direction and when to throw the ball.

“Caring adults like Jarrett Allen become role models for youth, inspiring them to explore new opportunities and expanding possibilities in fields like computer science and technology,” said Alexa Maille, a STEM Specialist with New York State 4-H Youth Development.

Allen said he has had technology in his hand ever since he can remember. When he was a sophomore in high school, he built his own computer by following YouTube videos and reading online forums. “I like it because it’s simple,” he told Weekend Today. “You connect a few things, and it either works or it doesn’t.”

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Talks at Twelve: Neil A. Lewis, Sunday, August 25, 2019

portrait of Neil A. Lewis, Jr. View Media

Talks at Twelve: Neil A. Lewis

Psychology of Stratification: How Social Position Influences Meaning Making, Motivation, and Behavior
May 17, 2018

Neil A. Lewis, Jr.
Cornell University

Tags: BCTR Talks at Twelve,   race,   video,  

Psychology of Stratification: How Social Position Influences Meaning Making, Motivation, and Behavior
May 17, 2018

Neil A. Lewis, Jr.
Cornell University

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Talks at Twelve: T.V. Sekher, Sunday, August 25, 2019

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Talks at Twelve: T.V. Sekher

Designing and Implementing the Longitudinal Ageing Study in India
May 25, 2017

T.V. Sekher
International Institute for Population Sciences


Designing and Implementing the Longitudinal Ageing Study in India
May 25, 2017

T.V. Sekher
International Institute for Population Sciences

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2017 John Doris Memorial Lecture, Sunday, August 25, 2019

John Doris speaking at a podium View Media

2017 John Doris Memorial Lecture

Making Good: Can We Realize Our Moral Aspirations?
April 12, 2017

John M. Doris
Washington University in St. Louis


Making Good: Can We Realize Our Moral Aspirations?
April 12, 2017

John M. Doris
Washington University in St. Louis

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Talks at Twelve: Dana Weiner, Sunday, August 25, 2019

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Talks at Twelve: Dana Weiner

Data-Driven Policy Making in Child Welfare
April 20, 2017

Dana Weiner
Chapin Hall, University of Chicago


Data-Driven Policy Making in Child Welfare
April 20, 2017

Dana Weiner
Chapin Hall, University of Chicago

(0) Comments.  |   Tags: BCTR Talks at Twelve    children    policy    translational research    video   

Talks at Twelve: Megan Comfort, Sunday, August 25, 2019

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Talks at Twelve: Megan Comfort

Beyond the Peer-Reviewed Article: Making Research Relevant for Community Stakeholders and Policymakers
March 7, 2017

Megan Comfort
Research Triangle Institute


Beyond the Peer-Reviewed Article: Making Research Relevant for Community Stakeholders and Policymakers
March 7, 2017

Megan Comfort
Research Triangle Institute

(0) Comments.  |   Tags: BCTR Talks at Twelve    policy    practice    translational research    video   

Talks at Twelve: Mardelle Shepley, Sunday, August 25, 2019

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Talks at Twelve: Mardelle Shepley

Mental and Behavioral Health Facilities: Critical Research and Design Recommendations
February 22, 2017

Mardelle Shepley
Design and Environmental Analysis, Cornell University


Mental and Behavioral Health Facilities: Critical Research and Design Recommendations
February 22, 2017

Mardelle Shepley
Design and Environmental Analysis, Cornell University

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Using disruptive innovation to grow 4-H

Tags: 4-H,   Andy Turner,   CCE,   New York,   video,   youth,  

By Sheri Hall for the BCTR

Portrait of Andy Turner

Andy Turner

If you follow business news – and specifically small, up-and-coming companies – you may have heard the term “disruptive innovation.” The theory, developed by Clayton Christensen from the Harvard Business School, describes how a product or process can leap ahead of established market leaders by reducing cost, increasing convenience, and bringing new customers to the table.  Could disruptive innovation help grow 4-H?

Andy Turner, head of the New York State 4-H Youth Development program (administered through and housed in the BCTR) of Cornell Cooperative Extension (CCE) thinks so. He is applying disruptive innovation theory to 4-H.  His dissertation, published in 2016, documented disruptive innovation at Cornell Cooperative Extension and attempted to identify the factors and conditions allowing innovation to grow and be adopted more widely.

Turner was asked to present his work at the Joint Council of Extension Professionals (JCEP) Virtual Town Hall Meeting in Orlando Florida earlier this year.  Turner and the other panelists discussed the challenges and barriers facing innovation adoption and responsiveness to emerging issues in CCE. The presentation reached a live audience of 300 and an online audience of an additional 500 extension staff from across the country.

Cooperative Extension has existed for more than 100 years with established programs and a track record of success, Turner said. But its approaches and organizational culture may not align well with changes in our culture, demographic shifts, and the impact of the internet on all facets of education.

“As a result, disruptive innovation is particularly relevant to Cooperative Extension as its work shifts to new ways of thinking and acting that will appeal to youth with new challenges, different approaches to learning, and markedly different expectations for engaging with educational institutions,” he said.

Dr. Turner is applying his work on innovation at a critical time for 4-H. 4-H offers an experiential learning approach to reach over 6 million youth annually, with programming in nearly every county in the nation.  However, like many large youth organizations, 4-H participation levels have not been growing, and there are many communities and youth that are underrepresented in 4-H programming.

In response, the national leadership of 4-H has embraced an ambitious growth vision, with the goal of using concepts like disruptive innovation and collaborative design processes to increase 4-H’s enrollment to 10 million youth by 2025.  Turner will be working with national 4-H leadership and private-sector 4-H supporters over the next two years to develop a blueprint for change based on identifying promising innovations already underway within state 4-H programs.

Dr. Turner leads a team of 8 program and administrative leaders at the New York State 4-H Office in the BCTR. You can reach him at ast4cornell.edu.

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Iscol lecturer takes on Trump immigration policies


Rebecca Heller speaking

Rebecca Heller speaking

By Stephen D'Angelo for the Cornell Chronicle

Rebecca Heller, co-founder and director of the International Refugee Assistance Project (IRAP), urges advocating for the rights of refugees against the waves of right-wing populist xenophobia sweeping through the U.S. and Europe. She was on campus Oct. 18 to deliver the College of Human Ecology’s Iscol Family Program for Leadership Development in Public Service Lecture.

Heller said her interest in the legal challenges facing refugees began on a trip to Jordan the summer after her first year in law school when met with six refugee families from Iraq. Each of the families independently identified their primary problem as a legal one, due to both the United Nation’s and U.S.’s complex bureaucratic asylum process.

In 2008, while still in law school, she founded IRAP with several peers with a mission to organize law students and lawyers to develop and enforce a set of legal and human rights for refugees and displaced persons.

“When [President] Trump was elected, we realized that the fundamental nature of our work was about to really significantly shift, where we were going to go from arguing that the refugee process should be improved and working with the government to find technical ways to make things more efficient, to defending the very existence of a refugee system or admissions at all,” Heller said.

After launching IRAP chapters at the University of California, Berkeley, and at Columbia, Stanford and New York University law schools, Heller began to think how best to mobilize and deploy her “army of a couple thousand lawyers” who wanted to fight for the rights of refugees.

The Monday after the president’s inauguration, a version of the travel ban was leaked to Heller. She fired off messages to her vast network of law students and pro bono lawyers, urging them to call their clients who had travel documents and say, “Get on a plane, right now. The doors to the U.S. are closing.”

Shortly after, Heller had the realization that whenever the travel ban order was signed, there would be thousands of people in the sky who had legal permission to enter the U.S. when they took off but would land as undocumented aliens – and no one knew what would happen to them.

“The travel ban was signed at 4:30 p.m. on Friday, Jan. 7. We had clients coming in that day, and we had lawyers waiting for them,” she said. After a client was detained upon landing, Heller worked with other organizations to file a civil action against the state agent who holds the defendant in custody.

“We stayed up all night and we drafted a nationwide class-action habeas petition … and we filed it at 5:30 in the morning because wanted to make sure it was on file with the court before any international flights could depart so that no one could be deported. We got a hearing for that night in Brooklyn at 7:30 p.m. … at 8:30 p.m. we won, and they released 2,100 people from airports all over the country.”

Rebecca Heller speaking with lecture attendees

Rebecca Heller speaking with lecture attendees

Heller and IRAP have taken legal action against all three travel bans. Their most recent filing, “International Refugee Assistance Project v. Trump,” was won by IRAP. The 91-page decision was issued in the early hours of Oct. 18.

Heller, who lost family in the Holocaust, thinks often about the ship The St. Louis, which carried Jewish refugees from Europe to the United States. The ship traveled from U.S. port to U.S. port but was not allowed to dock. It eventually had to return to Europe.

“They’ve actually traced the fate of a lot of people from The St. Louis, and most of them ended up dying in concentration camps. … and I think – what if every single port The St. Louis docked at, there were 5,000 Americans standing there chanting, ‘Let them in.’ Maybe history would have been a little bit different.”

Quoting Dr. Seuss, Heller told the audience in conclusion: “Unless someone like you cares a whole awful lot, nothing is going to get better, it’s not.”

Iscol lecturer takes on Trump immigration policies - Cornell Chronicle

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(0) Comments.  |   Tags: immigration    Iscol Family Program    Iscol Lecture    law    media mention    policy    video   

4-H intern on The Chew with Carla Hall

Tags: 4-H,   mentoring,   video,  

By Sheri Hall for the BCTR

news-4h-carlahall-inpostA 4-H intern from Brooklyn spent the day learning about cooking and entertainment from chef and TV personality Carla Hall thanks to a national 4-H mentoring program.

4-Her Jasmine Roberts is a dietician student at Brooklyn College. She spent a day shadowing Hall – a finalist on the cooking reality show Top Chef and co-host of the talk show The Chew – through the National 4-H Council's “Day in the Life Experience,” which connects youth with 4-H alumni.

Roberts is an intern with 4-H in New York City. She is currently mentoring high school students about the importance of nutrition and health through the 4-H Choose Health Action Teens program. She spent the day shadowing Hall at The Chew television set and then visiting Hall’s restaurant in Brooklyn.

Hall, herself, participated in 4-H cooking competitions as a youth, and said she appreciated the opportunity to give back to the program.

“Some of the skills I learned in 4-H that have helped me in life are being adventurous and trying something new,” she said. “Now, it’s about opening up the 4-Hers eyes to where they can go, and to the potential and to have no limitations.”

About 190,000 youth ages 5-19 participate in 4-H programs throughout New York each year. The program – housed in the Bronfenbrenner Center for Translational Research – serves as the youth outreach component of Cornell Cooperative Extension.

A major focus of 4-H is to help youth experience hands-on learning opportunities in science and technology, healthy living and civic engagement that help them grow into competent, caring and contributing members of society, says Andy Turner, New York State Leader for 4-H at Cornell University.

“Jasmine’s experience highlights core elements for 4-H,” he said. “It was hands-on and empowering.  You can see a powerful connection developing that could make a huge impact on how Jasmine thinks about her future goals.  That process of youth and adult partnership and mentoring lies at the heart of the 4-H program. “

The Chew’s Carla Hall Is Thankful for 4-H - Parade Magazine

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