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Anthony Burrow receives Engaged Scholar Prize


by Stephen D'Angelo for the Cornell Chronicle

portrait of Anthony Burrow

Anthony Burrow

Anthony Burrow, associate professor of human development in the College of Human Ecology, is the recipient of Cornell’s fourth annual Engaged Scholar Prize, Vice Provost for Engagement and Land-Grant Affairs Katherine A. McComas announced recently.

Administered by the Office of Engagement Initiatives, the prize recognizes a faculty member’s innovative approach to community-engaged scholarship that inspires students, colleagues and community partners alike.

“For me, the real honor of this award is that it recognizes the engagement aspect of learning,” said Burrow, who directs the Program for Research on Youth Development and Engagement (PRYDE) and is an affiliate of the Bronfenbrenner Center for Translational Research.

“It serves as a reminder that a solely classroom-based education is incomplete, as lectures cannot replace actual observation or participation in the topics I cover,” Burrow said. “Students learn the most about the world – and will eventually contribute more to it – by thoughtfully interacting with more of it.”

Burrow’s research focuses on topics related to youth purpose, identity processes and race-related experiences encountered by ethnic minority adolescents and young adults. His work examines the role of purpose in the lives of young people and how a sense of purpose can promote positive adjustment and development.

“Dr. Burrow’s scholarship is an ideal mix of science and engagement,” said Karl Pillemer, the Hazel E. Reed Professor of Human Development and senior associate dean for research and outreach in the College of Human Ecology. “Since arriving at Cornell, he has taken his careerlong research program on youth purpose and applied it in real-world contexts with outstanding results.”

Burrow was instrumental in securing funding for PRYDE, through which he has spread awareness of the importance of purpose for young people, Pillemer said. PRYDE, based in the Bronfenbrenner Center for Translational Research, aims to make the New York State 4-H Youth Development Program a “living laboratory” for research and evaluation, using science to determine the best ways of promoting optimal youth development in the state.

As program director, Burrow is developing opportunities and approaches to involve his colleagues and their students in community-engaged research practice and partnerships. In his partnership with the 4-H Youth Development Program, he is working with the Cornell Cooperative Extension network to understand and improve the lives of youth in New York state.

Said June Mead, association issue leader for Children, Youth and Families at Cornell Cooperative Extension – Broome County: “Through my personal involvement on the PRYDE Work Team, I have witnessed a deeper, more vibrant and meaningful level of collaboration with campus faculty – and this can be directly attributed to Tony’s leadership and vision for PRYDE.

“These opportunities for campus-county connections are energizing and vital to ensuring Cornell Cooperative Extension and New York State 4-H can deliver high-quality, research-based programs that meet the complex issues young people and communities face today,” Mead said.

By using a community-engaged learning pedagogy with his students, Burrow has them reflect on the real-world implications of what they’ve learned. Through this practice, Burrow is mentoring the students in his lab and facilitating healthy collaborations with community partners.The program provides third-year undergraduates the opportunity to learn how applied research interventions to help young people are developed in collaboration with experts in youth practice. Scholars then apply their new skills to community projects of their choice.

“Tony’s approach to his scholarship and his work with students is truly helping undergraduates learn how to apply their scholarship in the larger world, embrace leadership roles, and have a positive impact on real-world problems,” said Andrew Turner, director of NYS 4-H Youth Development. “His research and scholarship on youth purpose, combined with his ability to arouse the curiosity and passion of students and extension community-based educators, have been a driving force in the birth of this successful model of community engagement.”

The Engaged Scholar Prize carries an award of $30,000 to expand and deepen community-engaged activities through support to essential participants, including community partners, the faculty member and Cornell undergraduate, graduate or professional students.


Anthony Burrow receives Engaged Scholar Prize - Cornell Chronicle

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Workshop: How to Disseminate Your Research: A Step-by-Step Guide, Wednesday, November 7, 2018

 
image of the text "How to Do Research in Real-World Settings"

How to Disseminate Your Research: A Step-by-Step Guide
Rhoda Meador, Cornell Institute for Translational Research on Aging

Wednesday, November 7, 2018
12:00-1:30 p.m.
ILR Conference Center, Room 423



Dissemination should be incorporated into the earliest stages of a study and continue throughout the research process. In this interactive workshop, participants will create their own dissemination plan, including consideration of several key issues:

  • Clear communication
  • Identifying target audiences
  • Strengthening research partnerships

Dr. Rhoda Meador has been involved in numerous educational programs and research activities that bridge the gap between research and practice. Currently her research focuses on improving health and social systems to support the social engagement of older people. Dr. Meador has a Ph.D. in Consumer and Family Sciences from Iowa State University, an M.S.in adult learning from Marshall University and certification as a distance-learning specialist from the University of Wisconsin. She is the former Director of the Ithaca College Gerontology Institute

To Register:

Please contact Lori Biechele at lb274@cornell.edu
Lunch will be served.
This workshop is open to all Cornell faculty, staff and grad students.


Part of an interactive workshop series

Researchers are increasingly conducting studies in community settings and applying for grants that require documentation of real-world impact. Indeed, some funders now require components such as dissemination plans, stakeholder engagement, or community participation. To meet these new demands, researchers may wish to collaborate with non-academic groups and craft research questions and results that inform practice or policy. This series of interactive workshops shares the Bronfenbrenner Center for Translational Research’s extensive experience conducting research in real-world settings and translating empirical findings into practice. Each workshop addresses a key challenge that researchers face in doing translational research and provides practical tools for overcoming obstacles to conducting effective translational research.

Full 2018-2019 How To workshop series

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Learn translational research methods in our “How to” Workshops


Cornell researchers, are you interested in an introduction to or discovering more about translational research methods? The BCTR's How to Do Research in Real-World Settings interactive workshop series has you covered! In our third year of offering these workshops, we introduce some new topics and keep the basics in rotation.

Researchers are increasingly conducting studies in community settings and applying for grants that require documentation of real-world impact. Indeed, some funders now require components such as dissemination plans, stakeholder engagement, or community participation. To meet these new demands, researchers may wish to collaborate with non-academic groups and craft research questions and results that inform practice or policy. This year the BCTR continues our series of interactive workshops sharing the center’s extensive experience conducting research in real-world settings and translating empirical findings into practice. Each workshop addresses a key challenge that researchers face in doing translational research and provides practical tools for overcoming obstacles to conducting effective translational research.

The workshops are open to all Cornell faculty, staff, and graduate students.

2018-2019 Series

How to Disseminate Your Research: A Step-by-Step Guide
Wednesday, November 7, 12:00-1:30 p.m.
Room 423, ILR Conference Center
Rhoda Meador, Associate Director, Cornell Institute for Translational Research on Aging

How to Build Research Relationships with Non-Academic Partners
Tuesday, December 4, 12:00-1:30 p.m.
Room 423, ILR Conference Center
Karl Pillemer, Senior Associate Dean for Research and Outreach, College of Human Ecology
Leslie Schultz, Research Support Specialist, Cornell Institute for Translational Research on Aging

How to Plan and Conduct Interviews in Real-World Settings
Tuesday, February 5, 12:00-1:30 p.m.
Room 423, ILR Conference Center
Amanda Purington, Director of Evaluation, ACT for Youth
Jane Powers, Director, ACT for Youth

How to Use Video Observation as a Source of Data
Wednesday, March 6, 12:00-1:30 p.m.
Room 423, ILR Conference Center
Charles Izzo, Research Associate, The Residential Child Care Project

How to Use Graphs and Data to Inform and Engage Community Partners
Wednesday, April 17, 12:00-1:30 p.m.
Room 225, ILR Conference Center
Elliott G. Smith, Research Associate, BCTR and Residential Child Care Project

To Register:

Please contact Lori Biechele at lb274@cornell.edu
Lunch will be served with each workshop
This workshop is open to all Cornell faculty, staff, and grad students.

(2) Comments.  |   Tags: How to Do Research in Real-World Settings    translational research    workshop   

Doing Translational Research podcast: John Eckenrode, Saturday, September 21, 2019

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Doing Translational Research podcast: John Eckenrode

What is Translational Research?
May 3, 2018

John Eckenrode
Cornell University


What is Translational Research?
May 3, 2018

John Eckenrode
Cornell University

(0) Comments.  |   Tags: doing translational research    John Eckenrode    podcast    translational research   

Doing Translational Research podcast: Dana Weiner, Saturday, September 21, 2019

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Doing Translational Research podcast: Dana Weiner

Using Data to Help Children
April 27, 2017

Dana Weiner
Chapin Hall, University of Chicago


Using Data to Help Children
April 27, 2017

Dana Weiner
Chapin Hall, University of Chicago

(0) Comments.  |   Tags: children    doing translational research    podcast    policy    practice    translational research   

Talks at Twelve: Dana Weiner, Saturday, September 21, 2019

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Talks at Twelve: Dana Weiner

Data-Driven Policy Making in Child Welfare
April 20, 2017

Dana Weiner
Chapin Hall, University of Chicago


Data-Driven Policy Making in Child Welfare
April 20, 2017

Dana Weiner
Chapin Hall, University of Chicago

(0) Comments.  |   Tags: BCTR Talks at Twelve    children    policy    translational research    video   

Doing Translational Research podcast: Marney Thomas, Saturday, September 21, 2019

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Doing Translational Research podcast: Marney Thomas

Helping Create Healthy Military Families
April 10, 2017

Marney Thomas
The Military Projects, Cornell University


Helping Create Healthy Military Families
April 10, 2017

Marney Thomas
The Military Projects, Cornell University

(0) Comments.  |   Tags: doing translational research    evaluation    Marney Thomas    military    Military Projects    podcast    translational research   

Doing Translational Research podcast: Megan Comfort, Saturday, September 21, 2019

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Doing Translational Research podcast: Megan Comfort

Incarceration is a Family Issue
March 10, 2017

Megan Comfort
Research Triangle Institute


Incarceration is a Family Issue
March 10, 2017

Megan Comfort
Research Triangle Institute

(0) Comments.  |   Tags: doing translational research    podcast    policy    practice    translational research   

Talks at Twelve: Megan Comfort, Saturday, September 21, 2019

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Talks at Twelve: Megan Comfort

Beyond the Peer-Reviewed Article: Making Research Relevant for Community Stakeholders and Policymakers
March 7, 2017

Megan Comfort
Research Triangle Institute


Beyond the Peer-Reviewed Article: Making Research Relevant for Community Stakeholders and Policymakers
March 7, 2017

Megan Comfort
Research Triangle Institute

(0) Comments.  |   Tags: BCTR Talks at Twelve    policy    practice    translational research    video   

Doing Translational Research podcast: Mardelle Shepley, Saturday, September 21, 2019

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Doing Translational Research podcast: Mardelle Shepley

Architecture is a Social Art
February 14, 2017

Mardelle Shepley
Design and Environmental Analysis, Cornell University


Architecture is a Social Art
February 14, 2017

Mardelle Shepley
Design and Environmental Analysis, Cornell University

(0) Comments.  |   Tags: architecture    design    doing translational research    podcast    translational research