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How to Build Research Relationships with Non-Academic Partners, Monday, November 20, 2017

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How to Build Research Relationships with Non-Academic Partners
Karl Pillemer, director, BCTR

Monday, November 20, 2017
9:00-10:30 AM
102 Mann Library



This workshop will explore how researchers can build productive partnerships and avoid difficulties when conducting studies with non-academic organizations and agencies. We will examine common problems that arise in research projects in community settings, including differences in goals, organizational structure, timelines, and dissemination priorities. The workshop will feature examples of solutions to these problems, using methods for developing mutually beneficial community partnerships with agencies. This workshop is interactive so bring your questions, issues you have encountered doing research with community agencies, and lessons learned.

To Register:

Please contact Patty Thayer at pmt6@cornell.edu
Breakfast will be served
This workshop is open to all Cornell faculty, staff, and grad students.

 


how to workshopsPart of an interactive workshop series

Researchers are increasingly conducting studies in community settings and applying for grants that require documentation of real-world impact. Indeed, some funders now require components such as dissemination plans, stakeholder engagement, or community participation. To meet these new demands, researchers may wish to collaborate with non-academic groups and craft research questions and results that inform practice or policy. This series of interactive workshops shares the Bronfenbrenner Center for Translational Research’s extensive experience conducting research in real-world settings and translating empirical findings into practice. Each workshop addresses a key challenge that researchers face in doing translational research and provides practical tools for overcoming obstacles to conducting effective translational research.

Full 2017-2018 How To workshop series

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How to Disseminate Your Research: A Step-by-Step Guide, Monday, October 23, 2017

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How to Disseminate Your Research: A Step-by-Step Guide
Rhoda Meador, associate director, Cornell Institute for Translational Research on Aging

Monday, October 23, 2017
9:00-10:30 AM
102 Mann Library



To be most effective, dissemination should be incorporated into the earliest stages of a research study. In this workshop, participants will work through the process of creating their own dissemination plan, including consideration of several key issues:

  • Strategic Thinking
  • Writing for diverse audiences
  • Listening to potential stakeholders

event-meador-inpostRhoda Meador, Associate Director, Cornell Institute for Translational Research on Aging

Dr. Rhoda Meador has been involved in numerous educational programs and research activities that bridge the gap between research and practice. Currently her research focuses on improving health and social systems to support the social engagement of older people. Dr. Meador has a Ph.D. in Consumer and Family Sciences from Iowa State University, an M.S.in adult learning from Marshall University and certification as a distance-learning specialist from the University of Wisconsin. She is the former Director of the Ithaca College Gerontology Institute

To Register:

Please contact Patty Thayer at pmt6@cornell.edu
Breakfast will be served
This workshop is open to all Cornell faculty, staff, and grad students.

 

how to workshopsPart of an interactive workshop series

Researchers are increasingly conducting studies in community settings and applying for grants that require documentation of real-world impact. Indeed, some funders now require components such as dissemination plans, stakeholder engagement, or community participation. To meet these new demands, researchers may wish to collaborate with non-academic groups and craft research questions and results that inform practice or policy. This series of interactive workshops shares the Bronfenbrenner Center for Translational Research’s extensive experience conducting research in real-world settings and translating empirical findings into practice. Each workshop addresses a key challenge that researchers face in doing translational research and provides practical tools for overcoming obstacles to conducting effective translational research.

Full 2017-2018 How To workshop series

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New systematic translational review on outcomes for 4-H youth

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What is the quality of empirical evidence for youth outcomes as a result of their participation in 4-H? The BCTR's Research Synthesis Project addressed this question in their latest systematic translational review (STR).

4-H is the largest youth development organization in the United States, providing programming to over six million youth. Despite its reach, very little research has been conducted to assess youth outcomes within 4-H. To better understand the body of evidence for 4-H youth
participant outcomes, the Cornell Program for Research on Youth Development and Engagement (PRYDE) requested an STR to describe the quality, type, and focus of available evidence from both peer-reviewed and grey literature.

The Evidence for Outcomes from Youth Participation in 4-H STR finds that while there is some evidence suggesting 4-H participation provides some positive outcomes, most of the available studies lack rigorous research designs, which reduces confidence in the validity of these results.

The BCTR Research Synthesis Project supports the development of high-quality evidence summaries on topics nominated by practitioners and faculty within the Cornell Cooperative Extension system to illuminate the evidence base for their work.

To meet this need, the Systematic Translational Review (STR) process was developed to provide replicable systems and protocols for conducting timely and trustworthy research syntheses. STRs include the systematic features of a traditional review, the speed of a rapid review, and the inclusion of practitioner expertise to help guide search parameters and identify appropriate sources. By drawing upon both practitioner wisdom and the best available empirical evidence, the STR process supports the translation of evidence to practice in real-world settings.

A full listing of past STRs can be found here.

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Spring 2017 Talks at Twelve

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This semester we welcome speakers from across campus and across the U.S. for our spring 2017 Talks at Twelve series. Talks at Twelve are held in the Beebe Hall second floor conference room and lunch is served. These talks are free and open to all. No RSVP or registration is required, but notice is appreciated if a larger group is planning to attend (email pmt6@cornell.edu).

 

Wednesday, February 22, 12:00-1:00pm
Mental and Behavioral Health Facilities: Critical Research and Design Recommendations
Mardelle M. Shepley, Design and Environmental Analysis, Cornell University

 

 

comfortTuesday, March 7, 12:00-1:00pm
Beyond the Peer-Reviewed Article: Making Research Relevant for Community Stakeholders and Policymakers
Megan Comfort, Behavioral Health and Criminal Justice Research Division, Research Triangle Institute

 

 

Thursday, March 16, 12:00-1:00pm
Pain and Presence: The Clinical Use of Media
Andrea Stevenson Won, Communication, Cornell University

 

 

 

Thursday, April 13, 12:00-1:00pm
Healthy Base Initiative: Evaluating Programs to Encourage Healthy Eating, Active Lifestyles, and Tobacco-Free Living
Marney Thomas, BCTR, Cornell University

 

 

Thursday, April 20, 12:00-1:00pm
Data Driven Policy-Making in Child Welfare
Dana Weiner, Chapin Hall Center for Children, University of Chicago

 

 

 

Tuesday, April 25, 12:00-1:00pm
Weill Cornell Behavioral Geriatrics: Cognitive Impairment in Hospitalized Adults & Palliative & Mental Health Care
Elissa Kozlov and Keiko Kurita, Weill Cornell Medical College

 

 

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Talks at Twelve: Dana Weiner, Thursday, April 20, 2017

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Data-Driven Policy Making in Child Welfare
Dana Weiner, Chapin Hall Center for Children, University of Chicago

Thursday, April 20, 2017
12:00-1:00 PM
Beebe Hall, 2nd floor conference room



Dr. Weiner will address the challenges and opportunities associated with using data and research evidence to inform decision making in public policy.  Based on her extensive experience working within and around child welfare jurisdictions to innovate practice, align policy, and implement programs, her talk will identify key strategies for successfully incorporating new knowledge into service delivery in ways that are meaningful for leadership, staff, and (most importantly) the children and families served by these systems.  This discussion will include vivid examples of policy questions and the empirical answers that may guide innovation, as well as a discussion of the hazards and costs of uninformed policy decision making.

Dana Weiner is a policy fellow at the Chapin Hall Center for Children at the University of Chicago, where she provides analytic consultation and policy guidance to child welfare jurisdictions across the country.  Dr. Weiner teaches Data for Policy Analysis and Management to master's students at the University of Chicago, School of Social Service Administration, and her research has focused on quantifying resource accessibility - analyzing the role of geospatial relationships in child welfare systems - and on evaluating the implementation of evidence-based models in child welfare and juvenile justice contexts.

 

This talk is open to all. Lunch will be served. Metered parking is available in the Botanic Gardens lot across the road from Beebe Hall. No registration or RSVP required except for groups of 5 or more. We ask that larger groups email Patty at pmt6@cornell.edu letting us know of your plans to attend so that we can order enough lunch.

(0) Comments.  |   Tags: BCTR Talks at Twelve    children    policy    translational research   
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Talks at Twelve: Megan Comfort, Tuesday, March 7, 2017

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Beyond the Peer-Reviewed Article: Making Research Relevant for Community Stakeholders and Policymakers
Megan Comfort, Research Triangle Institute

Tuesday, March 7, 2017
12:00-1:00 PM
Beebe Hall, 2nd floor conference room



In an era of “alternative facts” and widespread activism, it is more important than ever for people in academic spheres to make research accessible, understandable, and usable outside of the Ivory Tower.  The tools available for doing so are vast – policy brief, fact sheets, in-person report-backs, social media posts, and more – and thus require thoughtfulness about the intended audience and the purpose of dissemination.  This talk will provide examples of strategies developed to communicate research findings to study participants, community stakeholders, and policymakers, highlighting the strengths of each and reflecting on the responsibilities of researchers to foster dialogue with people affected by their work.

Megan Comfort is a senior research sociologist in the Research Triangle Institute's International’s Behavioral Health and Criminal Justice research division.  Her areas of expertise include families and incarceration, HIV prevention, and health inequities among urban poor populations.  She is the author of Doing Time Together: Love and Family in the Shadow of the Prison (University of Chicago Press, 2008).  She also is a member of the Scholars Strategy Network, an advisory board member for Essie Justice Group (a non-profit organization that empowers women with incarcerated loved ones), and serves on the board of UnCommon Law (a non-profit organization that provides legal representation for people serving life sentences).

This talk is open to all. Lunch will be served. Metered parking is available in the Botanic Gardens lot across the road from Beebe Hall. No registration or RSVP required except for groups of 5 or more. We ask that larger groups email Patty at pmt6@cornell.edu letting us know of your plans to attend so that we can order enough lunch.

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Workshop series: How to Do Research in Real-World Settings

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how to workshopsResearchers are increasingly conducting studies in community settings and applying for grants that require documentation of real-world impact. Indeed, some funders now require components such as dissemination plans, stakeholder engagement, or community participation. To meet these new demands, researchers may wish to collaborate with non-academic groups and craft research questions and results that inform practice or policy. This fall the BCTR introduces a series of interactive workshops sharing the center’s extensive experience conducting research in real-world settings and translating empirical findings into practice. Each workshop addresses a key challenge that researchers face in doing translational research and provides practical tools for overcoming obstacles to conducting effective translational research. The workshops are open to all Cornell faculty, staff, and graduate students.

The series schedule:

How to Disseminate Your Research: From Planning to Action
Monday, November 14, 8:30-10:00am
G87 MVR Hall
Rhoda Meador, Associate Director, Cornell Institute for Translational Research on Aging

How to Build Research Relationships with Non-Academic Partners
Tuesday, December 6, 12:00-1:30pm
153 MVR Hall
Karl Pillemer, Director, BCTR
Jane Powers, Director, ACT for Youth
Martha Holden, Director, Residential Child Care Project

How to Recruit Diverse Participants
February 15, 12:00-1:30pm
157 MVR Hall
Jennifer Tiffany, Director, CUCE-NYC; Associate Director, BCTR
Eduardo Gonzalez, Diversity Specialist, CUCE-NYC

How to Conduct Focus Groups
Monday, March 14, 12:00-2:00pm
166 MVR Hall
Jane Powers, ACT for Youth
Mandy Purington, Director of Evaluation & Research, ACT for Youth

How to Address IRB Issues in Translational Research
Tuesday, April 11, 8:30am-10:00am
G87 MVR Hall
Elaine Wethington, Associate Director, BCTR; Professor of Human Development and Sociology

To Register:

Please contact Patty Thayer at pmt6@cornell.edu
A meal will be served with each workshop
This workshop is open to all Cornell faculty, staff, and grad students.

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Workshop: How to Recruit Diverse Participants, Wednesday, February 15, 2017

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How to Recruit Diverse Participants
Jennifer Tiffany and Eduardo Gonzalez, CUCE-NYC

Wednesday, February 15, 2017
12:00-1:30 PM
157 MVR Hall



This interactive workshop will explore the engagement, recruitment, and retention of diverse participants in the context of partnerships with organizations, agencies, and communities. We will walk you through a step-by-step process that supports successful recruitment efforts. Guided by the interests of workshop participants, discussion may focus on studies involving populations with distinct perspectives and needs (e.g., seniors, youth, immigrants, or teachers). The workshop will also address challenges related to retention because, in many studies, continued engagement for follow-up phases is as crucial as initial recruitment.

Jennifer Tiffany is executive director of Cornell University Cooperative Extension's New York City Programs, director of outreach and community engagement for the BCTR, and co-director of the Community Engagement in Research component of Weill Cornell Medical College's Clinical and Translational Sciences Center, working to promote the translation of Cornell’s research to communities throughout New York State and beyond at the same time as working to increase community members’, policy makers', and practitioners’ participation in developing research projects and agendas. Many of her scholarly articles focus on youth participation and HIV risk reduction. She holds a Ph.D. in City and Regional Planning from Cornell University.

Eduardo González, Jr. is the state diversity, research partnership development, and youth development specialist for Cornell Cooperative Extension - NYC at Cornell University. Mr. González is assists staff, managers, administrators and their respective organizations in developing the awareness, understanding, and skills to support and/or provide leadership in organizational change efforts on diversity and inclusion.
Eduardo holds a bachelor's in human services and a master’s in public administration from Pace University. Mr. González is a past fellow of the W.K. Kellogg Foundation International Fellowship in Community Development sponsored by Partners of the Americas. He is a Cornell Certified Diversity Professional (CCDP) and holds a certificate in Diversity Management from Cornell University’s School of Industrial and Labor Relations.

To Register:

Please contact Patty Thayer at pmt6@cornell.edu
Lunch will be served.
This workshop is open to all Cornell faculty, staff, and grad students.

 

event-htdrrws-event-image2Part of an interactive workshop series

Researchers are increasingly conducting studies in community settings and applying for grants that require documentation of real-world impact. Indeed, some funders now require components such as dissemination plans, stakeholder engagement, or community participation. To meet these new demands, researchers may wish to collaborate with non-academic groups and craft research questions and results that inform practice or policy. This series of interactive workshops shares the Bronfenbrenner Center for Translational Research’s extensive experience conducting research in real-world settings and translating empirical findings into practice. Each workshop addresses a key challenge that researchers face in doing translational research and provides practical tools for overcoming obstacles to conducting effective translational research.

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Workshop: How to Address IRB Issues in Translational Research, Tuesday, April 11, 2017

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How to Address IRB Issues in Translational Research
Elaine Wethington, BCTR

Tuesday, April 11, 2017
8:30-10:00 AM
G87 MVR Hall



In this workshop you will learn how to present a community-based translational research study to an institutional review board (IRB) for human participants. We’ll cover the federal regulations and guidance documents that are relevant to IRB review of community-based studies. Workshop attendees will discuss case studies and learn the principles used by IRBs to review studies of this type. Greater knowledge of the IRB process may help participants prevent review delays. Workshop participants will also learn how the pending revision of the Common Rule may impact the review of community-based translational studies.

Elaine Wethington, Associate Director, BCTR; Professor of Human Development and Sociology

To Register:

Please contact Patty Thayer at pmt6@cornell.edu
Lunch will be served.
This workshop is open to all Cornell faculty, staff, and grad students.

 

event-htdrrws-event-image2Part of an interactive workshop series

Researchers are increasingly conducting studies in community settings and applying for grants that require documentation of real-world impact. Indeed, some funders now require components such as dissemination plans, stakeholder engagement, or community participation. To meet these new demands, researchers may wish to collaborate with non-academic groups and craft research questions and results that inform practice or policy. This series of interactive workshops shares the Bronfenbrenner Center for Translational Research’s extensive experience conducting research in real-world settings and translating empirical findings into practice. Each workshop addresses a key challenge that researchers face in doing translational research and provides practical tools for overcoming obstacles to conducting effective translational research.

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Workshop: How to Conduct Focus Groups, Tuesday, March 14, 2017

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How to Conduct Focus Groups
Jane Powers and Mandy Purington, ACT for Youth

Tuesday, March 14, 2017
12:00-2:00 PM
166 MVR Hall



Focus groups are a unique, and sometimes challenging, way to collect qualitative data. During a focus group, participants are asked about their perceptions, opinions, and attitudes in an interactive group setting. This workshop will provide an overview of planning and conducting focus groups, including:

  • defining a focus group
  • designing focus group questions
  • recruiting and preparing for participants
  • facilitation tips and
  • analyzing the data.

Jane Powers, Director, ACT for Youth
Amanda Purington, Amanda Purington, Director of Evaluation & Research, ACT for Youth

To Register:

Please contact Patty Thayer at pmt6@cornell.edu
Lunch will be served.
This workshop is open to all Cornell faculty, staff, and grad students.

 

event-htdrrws-event-image2Part of an interactive workshop series

Researchers are increasingly conducting studies in community settings and applying for grants that require documentation of real-world impact. Indeed, some funders now require components such as dissemination plans, stakeholder engagement, or community participation. To meet these new demands, researchers may wish to collaborate with non-academic groups and craft research questions and results that inform practice or policy. This series of interactive workshops shares the Bronfenbrenner Center for Translational Research’s extensive experience conducting research in real-world settings and translating empirical findings into practice. Each workshop addresses a key challenge that researchers face in doing translational research and provides practical tools for overcoming obstacles to conducting effective translational research.

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