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New systematic review on peer education

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What is the evidence for use of peer education in programs supporting adolescent reproductive and sexual health? The BCTR Research Synthesis Project develops high-quality evidence summaries on topics suggested by researchers or practitioners. Their latest review looked into this question.

From the review:

Peer education is a method for intervention or program delivery that is defined by the use of members of the learner group to partly or fully facilitate program activities. Using members of similar age or status (Tolli, 2012) to share health information is thought to work through the social influence of the peer group, which can have a strong impact on adolescents (Maticka-Tyndale & Barnett, 2010). The role of these peer educators ranges from low responsibility to high responsibility (Hart, 1992): Low responsibility might include only specific aspects of implementation such as visiting to share stories, or participating in role plays. Higher levels of participation might include full input on program development, co-facilitation, or full facilitation.

The review found no convincing evidence that this type of education improved sexual outcomes for adolescents.

STRs help researchers and extension associated understand the broad body of evidence on a topic so they can put that information into practice in real-world settings. Full listing of past STRs

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New systematic review: Intergenerational programs

(0) Comments  |   Tags: CITRA,   PRYDE,   systematic translational reviews,   youth,  
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By Sheri Hall for the BCTR

Do intergenerational programs that include youth and older adults improve connectedness? The BCTR's Research Synthesis Project addressed this question in their latest systematic translational review (STR).

The aim of the review was to find out if middle and high school students who interact with older adults became more comfortable and changed their attitudes toward older people. It also evaluated whether older adults who participated in these programs changed their perceptions about youth.

The analysis helps to guide programming and evaluation studies for the Program for Research on Youth Development and Engagement (PRYDE) and the Cornell Institute for Translational Research on Aging (CITRA).

The review found that youth and older adults’ attitudes toward each other improve after they participated in intergenerational programs. They also found that youth engaged in more behaviors to benefit others and were more likely to rate themselves as healthy. Older adults who participated reported improved wellbeing and concern for others.

Researchers did find that the body of evidence on intergenerational programs is small, and more research is needed to draw strong conclusions and understand the impact fully.

The BCTR Research Synthesis Project supports the development of high-quality evidence summaries on topics suggested by researchers or practitioners.

STRs help researchers and extension associated understand the broad body of evidence on a topic so they can put that information into practice in real-world settings.

A full listing of past STRs can be found here.

(0) Comments.  |   Tags: CITRA    PRYDE    systematic translational reviews    youth   
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New systematic translational review on outcomes for 4-H youth

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What is the quality of empirical evidence for youth outcomes as a result of their participation in 4-H? The BCTR's Research Synthesis Project addressed this question in their latest systematic translational review (STR).

4-H is the largest youth development organization in the United States, providing programming to over six million youth. Despite its reach, very little research has been conducted to assess youth outcomes within 4-H. To better understand the body of evidence for 4-H youth
participant outcomes, the Cornell Program for Research on Youth Development and Engagement (PRYDE) requested an STR to describe the quality, type, and focus of available evidence from both peer-reviewed and grey literature.

The Evidence for Outcomes from Youth Participation in 4-H STR finds that while there is some evidence suggesting 4-H participation provides some positive outcomes, most of the available studies lack rigorous research designs, which reduces confidence in the validity of these results.

The BCTR Research Synthesis Project supports the development of high-quality evidence summaries on topics nominated by practitioners and faculty within the Cornell Cooperative Extension system to illuminate the evidence base for their work.

To meet this need, the Systematic Translational Review (STR) process was developed to provide replicable systems and protocols for conducting timely and trustworthy research syntheses. STRs include the systematic features of a traditional review, the speed of a rapid review, and the inclusion of practitioner expertise to help guide search parameters and identify appropriate sources. By drawing upon both practitioner wisdom and the best available empirical evidence, the STR process supports the translation of evidence to practice in real-world settings.

A full listing of past STRs can be found here.

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Best practices for professional training and technical assistance

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What does research evidence tell us about best practices for professional training and technical assistance for practitioners delivering evidence-based programs to youth? The latest BCTR systematic translational review (STR) addresses this question.

The BCTR Research Synthesis Project supports the development of high-quality evidence summaries on topics nominated by practitioners and faculty within the Cornell Cooperative Extension system to illuminate the evidence base for their work.

To meet this need, the Systematic Translational Review (STR) process was developed to provide replicable systems and protocols for conducting timely and trustworthy research syntheses. STRs include the systematic features of a traditional review, the speed of a rapid review, and the inclusion of practitioner expertise to help guide search parameters and identify appropriate sources. By drawing upon both practitioner wisdom and the best available empirical evidence, the STR process supports the translation of evidence to practice in real-world settings.

The Best Practices in Professional Training and Technical Assistance STR finds that research has identified best practices in the field of adult education, and key training components have been described
from practice, but more rigorous empirical evaluation is needed to better characterize the components of effective training and technical assistance in this field. Read the full review for further details.

A full listing of all STRs can be found here.

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New systematic reviews on 4-H public speaking programs and volunteer engagement

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How can 4-H youth programs improve volunteer recruitment and retention? What is the impact of 4-H public speaking programs? The latest BCTR systematic translational reviews (STRs) address these questions. These topics were proposed to the BCTR Research Synthesis Project as questions that needed addressing with the best existing research available in order to strengthen 4-H programming and improve volunteer engagement and retention.

The Impact of 4-H Public Speaking Programs STR reports that there seem to be some positive outcomes from youth participation in public speaking programs, but more rigorous research is needed to confirm these findings.

The Volunteer Motivation STR finds that when volunteers’ experiences are more closely connected to their initial motivations to give time, they may be more likely to sign up and stay on in a volunteer role.

The BCTR Research Synthesis Project supports the development of high-quality evidence summaries on topics nominated by practitioners and faculty within the Cornell Cooperative Extension system to illuminate the evidence base for their work.

To meet this need, the Systematic Translational Review (STR) process was developed to provide replicable systems and protocols for conducting timely and trustworthy research syntheses. STRs include the systematic features of a traditional review, the speed of a rapid review, and the inclusion of practitioner expertise to help guide search parameters and identify appropriate sources. By drawing upon both practitioner wisdom and the best available empirical evidence, the STR process supports the translation of evidence to practice in real-world settings.

A full listing of past STRs can be found here.

(0) Comments.  |   Tags: 4-H    systematic translational reviews    volunteering    Youth Development Research Update   
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New systematic translational review on improving young children’s reading skills

(0) Comments  |   Tags: childhood,   education,   Mary Maley,   systematic translational reviews,  
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A new systematic translational review (STR) from the BCTR Research Synthesis Project examined whether there are brief, low-cost, home-based parenting interventions that improve pre-reading skills for children ages 2–5. The review of existing research on this subject found that there is an at-home method that has demonstrable positive effects on young children's reading skills: dialogic reading. For more information on the review process and findings, see the full STR, Parenting Interventions to Improve Pre-literacy Reading Skills for Children Ages 2–5.

STRs are the result of a new research synthesis protocol designed to include practitioner input in the review process while maintaining the structure of a systematic review and speed of a rapid review. The method was developed by Research Synthesis Project director Mary Maley to improve the accessibility and use of research evidence by community practitioners and policy makers. Review topics focus on applied practice questions which require a synopsis of evidence to use in order to strengthen program implementation. More about the STR process can be found here.

 

Previously pr0duced STRs:

(0) Comments.  |   Tags: childhood    education    Mary Maley    systematic translational reviews   
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New systematic translational review on teen pregnancy prevention programs

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The newest systematic translational review (STR) from the  BCTR Research Synthesis Project considers the question, "Do teen pregnancy prevention programs that include education for the teenagers’ parents show positive results?" A review of evaluations of existing evidence-based programs found that there could be benefits that varied from program to program. Full findings can be found in Parent Education for Teen Pregnancy Prevention.

STRs are the result of a new research synthesis protocol designed to include practitioner input in the review process while maintaining the structure of a systematic review and speed of a rapid review. The method was developed by Research Synthesis Project director Mary Maley to improve the accessibility and use of research evidence by community practitioners and policy makers. Review topics focus on applied practice questions which require a synopsis of evidence to use in order to strengthen program implementation. More about the STR process can be found here.

Previously pr0duced STRs:

Community Engagement in Practice

Psycho-Social Evaluation Measures for 8-12 year-olds in Nutrition Education Programs

 

(0) Comments.  |   Tags: pregnancy    Research Synthesis Project    sexual health    systematic translational reviews    youth   
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Research Synthesis Project releases first sytematic translational reviews

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The BCTR Research Synthesis Project released its first two systematic translational reviews (STRs) this spring. The first identified validated measures of youth nutrition program outcomes, and the second examined the concept of “engagement” in university-community partnerships. These two STRs are the result of a new research synthesis protocol designed to include practitioner input in the review process while maintaining the structure of a systematic review and speed of a rapid review. The method was developed by Research Synthesis Project director Mary Maley to improve the accessibility and use of research evidence by community practitioners and policy makers. Review topics focus on applied practice questions which require a synopsis of evidence to use in order to strengthen program implementation. More about the STR process can be found here.

Psycho-Social Evaluation Measures for 8-12 year-olds in Nutrition Education Programs explores the question, "Which validated surveys measure changes in nutrition knowledge, attitudes, behavioral intent and self-efficacy among 8-12-year-olds in nutrition education programs?" The reviewers found that there wasn't a singular measure to recommend across programs, but that practitioners should select the best fit for their program from the identified validated measures.

The second STR considers, "How is “Community Engagement” described and operationalized in practice?" Community Engagement in Practice concludes that empirical literature does "not reflect a consistent meaning of the term, or the activities associated with it," but suggests ways that both program practitioners and researchers can address and remedy this ambiguity.

(0) Comments.  |   Tags: Mary Maley    nutrition    research    Research Synthesis Project    systematic translational reviews   
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