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Retirement can bring health risks

Tags: aging,   Maria Fitzpatrick,   research,  

Portrait of Maria Fitzpatrick

Maria Fitzpatrick,

By Sheri Hall for the BCTR

Most people think of their retirement as golden years when they will pursue hobbies and passions they did not have time for when working full-time. But a study by Maria Fitzpatrick, the BCTR’s Milman Fellow, finds that the post-work years may not be so idyllic.

Fitzpatrick published a working paper that examined the link between retirement and health. To do this, she and her coauthor, Timothy Moore, combined data on mortality from the National Center for Health Statistics, a longitudinal data set of all deaths in the U.S., and Social Security benefits records.

Since Social Security benefits are first available at age 62, many people retire when they reach that age.  Fitzpatrick wanted to find out if there were also sudden changes in health at that age.  She found an increase in mortality for men at age 62. The increased risk was smaller and not as clear for women.

Since both men and women are most likely to collect Social Security benefits at age 62, but only men are more likely to retire, the increase in mortality is likely not related to collecting new benefits, but retiring from work, Fitzpatrick said.

“Retirement is a time of people’s lives when there is a lot of uncertainty,” she said. “The results from our study suggest that people thinking about early retirement should pay close attention to their health as they transition to retirement.  They should be sure to take care of themselves, be careful in their activities, especially driving, and check in with a physician if anything goes awry.”

Fitzpatrick did find some limitations in the data. Specifically, there was no way to tell if the increases in mortality continued in the long-term as people got older and no way to measure mortality rates when people retired at ages other than 62.

Fitzpatrick is an associate professor in the Department of Policy and Management and research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research.

Related:

Fitzpatrick named BCTR Milman Fellow

Ep. 18: The Well Being of Children and Older Adults with Maria Fitzpatrick - Doing Translational Research podcast

(0) Comments.  |   Tags: aging    Maria Fitzpatrick    research   

Researchers: Work with us!


photo of researcher at a desk in a computer lab

NDACAN Summer Research Institute attendee Yahayra Michel Smith working with a dataset

By Sheri Hall for the BCTR

Calling all Cornell social science researchers: The Bronfenbrenner Center for Translational Research offers a broad range of opportunities for scholars interested in conducting translational research.

For faculty members interested in translational research, BCTR experts can strengthen a grant proposal, offer training and technical support, and help to set up collaborative relationships with faculty members. For experienced researchers, the BCTR offers access to data sets and research participants that can increase the likelihood your project will receive funding.

“When we think about translational research in the BCTR, we focus on assisting social scientists who want to move their theories, models, and methods into real-world settings,” said Karl Pillemer, director of the BCTR. “We can help them shortcut a lengthy sample recruitment process because of our access to diverse vulnerable populations. The BCTR also has an unusual array of data sets available for secondary analysis, including evaluation studies that address a range of human problems. And we can assist researchers in thinking out dissemination plans for their proposals.”

The BCTR can also open doors for researchers who wish to connect with the statewide network of county Cornell Cooperative Extension (CCE) associations.

Many associations now have “Research Navigators,” who have been trained in research methodologies, ethical considerations, and participant recruitment strategies. Many social scientists at Cornell have found that partnerships with Cooperative Extension educators help them to identify emerging needs and research questions from people on the ground in the communities across New York State.  CCE educators also provide invaluable help in recruiting participants for Cornell research projects.

“A great example is the state 4-H Youth Development Program,” Pillemer said. “Any researcher recruiting youth from elementary through high school can find assistance in recruiting diverse participants in this age range.”

Karl Pillemer (HDEV) in conversation with 87-year old alumna Helen Rosenblatt for The Legacy Project: Older Americans offer tips and advice on surviving and thriving.

Research participant Helene Rosenblatt with Karl Pillemer (used with permission)

In addition to the 4-H program, the BCR has cultivated relationships with an array of organizations that provide access to broad segments of the population in New York State, including thousands of low-income families who participate in nutrition programs, military families, more than 300,000 members of senior centers in New York City, and more. These “research ready” organizations can facilitate recruitment of hard-to-reach populations.

In addition, the BCTR shares data collected through more than 20 projects that span the life course, offering a unique opportunity for secondary analysis. The data sets include 4-H participant data, the National Child Abuse and Neglect Data Achieve, data from parents of children who self-injure, surveys of nursing home staff and workers in residential youth facilities, and many others.

“Since it began 7 years ago, a core mission of the BCTR has been to make it easier for Cornell researchers to conduct translational research involving agencies, organizations, and communities. We have now organized a set of services to make it even easier for faculty, graduate students, and other researchers to collaborate with us.”

To find out more, see our For Researchers page.

(1) Comment.  |   Tags: research    translational research   

Cornell Project 2Gen sponsors early education research


By Sheri Hall for the BCTR

Cornell Project 2Gen sponsored two researchers’ presentations at the Child Care and Early Education Policy Research Consortium meeting last month in Washington D.C.

Portrait of Lisa McCabe

Lisa McCabe

BCTR research associate Lisa McCabe, Cornell sociology professor John Sipple and Cornell alumnae Hope Casto, associate professor of education studies at Skidmore College, gave two presentations to early education scholars on research sponsored by Project 2Gen, which focuses on helping vulnerable families by developing programs that support parents and their children jointly.

The first explored factors related to child care deserts, neighborhoods and communities that are lacking access to child care for working families, particularly for children under 5 years old. The work is in its early stages, McCabe said.

“Project 2Gen has allowed us to expand our work to specifically look at Head Start, regulated child care centers, family child care homes and public pre-kindergarten,” she said. “We are particularly interested in how capacity may vary by rural or urban status and community wealth.”

Their second presentation focused on the challenges in working with administrative data, and various strategies for addressing them.

“As states across the country work to improve and expand their state-wide databases on early care and education, opportunities to use these data for researching policy-relevant trends are increasing,” McCabe said. “Yet working with these large, complex data sets can be difficult.

“By sharing lessons learned in the Project 2Gen work, we hope to facilitate better collaboration between state-level administrators and researchers to promote high-quality research that informs early education policy. “

Project 2Gen works to build a community of scholars focused on 2Gen approaches to support vulnerable families and partners with practitioners and policymakers throughout New York and the nation. Two-generational programs can begin by focusing on children and then add a component to support parents, such as parent education or skills classes. Others may focus on parents, and then add a component for children, such as child care or nutrition support. Still other approaches target systems that influence families, such as schools or workplaces.

(0) Comments.  |   Tags: children    conference    Cornell Project 2Gen    education    Lisa McCabe    presentation    research   

Workshop: How to Build Research Relationships with Non-Academic Partners, Monday, November 20, 2017

 
how to workshops

How to Build Research Relationships with Non-Academic Partners
Karl Pillemer, director, BCTR

Monday, November 20, 2017
9:00-10:30 AM
102 Mann Library



This workshop will explore how researchers can build productive partnerships and avoid difficulties when conducting studies with non-academic organizations and agencies. We will examine common problems that arise in research projects in community settings, including differences in goals, organizational structure, timelines, and dissemination priorities. The workshop will feature examples of solutions to these problems, using methods for developing mutually beneficial community partnerships with agencies. This workshop is interactive so bring your questions, issues you have encountered doing research with community agencies, and lessons learned.

To Register:

Please contact Patty Thayer at pmt6@cornell.edu
Breakfast will be served
This workshop is open to all Cornell faculty, staff, and grad students.


how to workshopsPart of an interactive workshop series

Researchers are increasingly conducting studies in community settings and applying for grants that require documentation of real-world impact. Indeed, some funders now require components such as dissemination plans, stakeholder engagement, or community participation. To meet these new demands, researchers may wish to collaborate with non-academic groups and craft research questions and results that inform practice or policy. This series of interactive workshops shares the Bronfenbrenner Center for Translational Research’s extensive experience conducting research in real-world settings and translating empirical findings into practice. Each workshop addresses a key challenge that researchers face in doing translational research and provides practical tools for overcoming obstacles to conducting effective translational research.

Full 2017-2018 How To workshop series

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Collaboration lowers incidence of physical restraint for youth in care


Michael Nunno and Elliott Smith

Michael Nunno and Elliott Smith

By Sheri Hall for the BCTR

Two BCTR researchers have been working with a Connecticut child welfare agency to implement and evaluate a program that promotes evidence-based approaches in supporting troubled youth. The Cornell researchers and two agency administrators published the results of their collaborative effort in March in the journal Child Welfare under the title “Benefits of embedding research into practice: An agency-university collaboration”.

Since 2009, Michael Nunno and Elliott Smith, members of the research team for the Residential Child Care Project (RCCP), have consulted with Waterford County School in Connecticut, which provides residential and day care to youth with mental health problems, behavioral issues, addiction and emotional problems.

A team of agency executives, clinicians, supervisors and staff members worked with RCCP staff and consultants to learn about and implement the Children and Residential Experiences: Creating Conditions for Change (CARE) program model.  The CARE model is a research-informed framework created at the BCTR by Martha Holden and her RCCP colleagues that focuses on improving interpersonal relationships between caregivers and youth.  Nunno and Smith were part of the effort to examine if CARE was making a difference in the day-to-day life of the children and staff. 

After the school implemented the program, agency administration reported a substantial decrease in physical restraints among the school’s residential population.  Physical restraints are safety interventions that hold a youth in order to contain physical behavior that is likely to result in injury to the youth or others.  They are, however, not without risks to both the child and the staff since they can have harmful or even fatal consequences. 

“The wonderful thing about the Waterford Country School from an evaluator’s perspective is that it has a thirty-year history of collecting and publishing administrative data on measures that matter to practitioners,” Nunno said.  Our job was to portray the data in relevant and meaningful ways so that it could inform practice, soften professional resistance to change, and add to the growing evidence that relationship-based, trauma-informed practice models can create safe and therapeutic physical spaces.”

“By examining the data, we documented a 48 percent decrease in restraint events within Waterford’s residential and shelter settings,” he said. “We were able to verify the staff perceptions and narratives that the Waterford agency was becoming a safer, calmer place.” 

Yet not all Waterford programs saw this decline.  “The day-school data showed an increase in restraints in the corresponding time frame,” Nunno said.  “Although we were all surprised at this finding, our analysis triggered the agency leadership to examine the children’s social and emotional regulation needs.  They involved day-school teachers and children’s families who designed unified approaches to meet those needs.  Within months of implementing these strategies we saw a significant decrease in the use of restraints.”

The partnership between RCCP and the school demonstrates RCCP’s success at monitoring and detecting problems, guiding solutions, improving practice, supporting learning organizations, and contributing more broadly to evidence-based practice. 

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(0) Comments.  |   Tags: article    collaboration    Elliott Smith    evaluation    Michael Nunno    RCCP    research    residential care    youth   

Teen dating violence strong predictor of future abuse


exner-cortens

Deinera Exner-Cortens

Teens who experience physical or psychological violence in their adolescent dating relationships have a significantly greater risk of suffering abuse in their future adult romantic relationships. A new study, led by University of Calgary, Faculty of Social Work researcher Deinera Exner-Cortens, PhD, has isolated dating violence as a strong predictor that someone will suffer future abuse, even when victimized individuals were compared to others with similar backgrounds but who did not experience dating violence.

Exner-Cortens completed this research as a doctoral student at Cornell, working with John Eckenrode (BCTR associate director and professor of human development), who is also a co-author on the article.

Domestic violence takes a huge toll on the health and well-being of victims and families. Studies have shown that intimate partner violence against women has an estimated societal cost of $5.8 billion. In this light, Exner-Cortens says her study is a wake-up call that adolescent dating violence needs to be taken more seriously.

“When I talk to adolescents, they may not recognize that what they’re experiencing is dating violence,” says Exner-Cortens. “For a lot of them, it's their very first encounter in a romantic setting, so they may not know that it's not healthy. So, from a primary prevention – or stopping it before it starts – standpoint, we want to be communicating healthy relationships messages to adolescents. That you have a right to be safe in your relationship, and if a partner ever makes you feel unsafe or hurts you, that's not okay, and you have a right to leave, and to seek help.”

Exner-Cortens’ study, recently published in the Journal of Adolescent Health, is the first to demonstrate, in a U.S. national sample, that adolescent dating violence is uniquely implicated in a cycle of violence from adolescence to adulthood, even when comparing teens who were matched on key risk factors at the socio-demographic, individual, family, peer, school and community levels.

“For a long time adolescent romantic relationships weren’t a focus in research because people thought that they didn’t really matter for well-being,” explains Exner-Cortens. “This study strongly demonstrates that violence first experienced in adolescent relationships may become chronic, and that adolescent dating violence is an important risk factor for adult partner violence.”

Exner-Cortens and colleagues analyzed a sample of 2,161 American male and female heterosexual youth from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health. Participants were first interviewed about their dating experiences when they were ages 12-18, and then again five, and 12 years later. To measure dating violence, participants were asked if a partner had ever used insults, name-calling or disrespect in front of others; sworn at them; threatened them with violence; pushed or shoved them; or thrown objects that could hurt. Over a one-year period, about 19 per cent of teen respondents reported dating violence.

Five years after they were first victimized, female victims of adolescent dating violence had almost 1.5 times greater risk for experiencing physical adult intimate partner violence, and male victims had almost twice the risk for experiencing adult intimate partner violence. Individuals who reported intimate partner violence five years after dating violence victimization were also more likely to report intimate partner violence victimization during the twelve-year follow-up. These findings were all in comparison to a group who did not experience dating violence, but who were otherwise very similar in terms of risk history to dating violence victims. Variables used to create this well-matched comparison group included known predictors of adult intimate partner violence, such as child maltreatment, substance use and mental health.

“This is the first study to show that even when we get rid of many other confounding factors, dating violence still emerges as a predictor,” says Exner-Cortens. “Something is happening in those relationships over and above other things that would predict risk. Dating violence appears to set off some sort of cycle in terms of interpersonal violence.”

Exner-Cortens is calling for improved screening for adolescent dating violence in health-care settings, as well as the need for intervention programs for teens who have experienced abuse in their dating relationships. Programs that prevent adolescent dating violence before it starts are also key to intimate partner violence prevention.

Study co-authors are John Eckenrode (Cornell University), John Bunge (Cornell University) and Emily Rothman (Boston University). The research was supported by funding from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research.

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(0) Comments.  |   Tags: adolescence    article    Deinera Exner-Cortens    domestic violence    John Eckenrode    research    violence   

Doing Translational Research podcast with Chris Wildeman


wildemanIn episode 6 of the BCTR podcast Doing Translational Research, center director Karl Pillemer talks with Christopher Wildeman about his research on mass incarceration and inequality. Christopher Wildeman is an associate professor of policy analysis and management in the College of Human Ecology at Cornell, where he is also co-director of the National Data Archive on Child Abuse and Neglect and a faculty fellow here in the Bronfenbrenner Center for Translational Research.

Chris talks about his research and the way working with communities has strengthened his work. His research and teaching interests revolve around the consequences of mass imprisonment for inequality, with emphasis on families, health, and children. He is also interested in child welfare, especially as relates to child maltreatment and the foster care system.

Ep. 6: Incarceration and Inequality with Christopher Wildeman - Doing Translational Research podcast

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(0) Comments.  |   Tags: children    Christopher Wildeman    doing translational research    incarceration    podcast    research    translation   

Best practices for professional training and technical assistance


What does research evidence tell us about best practices for professional training and technical assistance for practitioners delivering evidence-based programs to youth? The latest BCTR systematic translational review (STR) addresses this question.

The BCTR Research Synthesis Project supports the development of high-quality evidence summaries on topics nominated by practitioners and faculty within the Cornell Cooperative Extension system to illuminate the evidence base for their work.

To meet this need, the Systematic Translational Review (STR) process was developed to provide replicable systems and protocols for conducting timely and trustworthy research syntheses. STRs include the systematic features of a traditional review, the speed of a rapid review, and the inclusion of practitioner expertise to help guide search parameters and identify appropriate sources. By drawing upon both practitioner wisdom and the best available empirical evidence, the STR process supports the translation of evidence to practice in real-world settings.

The Best Practices in Professional Training and Technical Assistance STR finds that research has identified best practices in the field of adult education, and key training components have been described
from practice, but more rigorous empirical evaluation is needed to better characterize the components of effective training and technical assistance in this field. Read the full review for further details.

A full listing of all STRs can be found here.

(0) Comments.  |   Tags: research    systematic translational reviews   

PRYDE inaugural explores the future of youth development research

Tags: PRYDE,   research,   video,   youth,   youth development,  

prydepanel

L-R: Lisa Lauxman, Lawrence Aber, Robert Sellers

The inaugural celebration for the Program for Research on Youth Development and Engagement (PRYDE) featured three eminent speakers in a panel discussion on “The Future of Youth Development Research: Perspectives from Research and Practice.” This panel uniquely reflected the mission of PRYDE in that it brought research perspectives (Dr. Robert Sellers from University of Michigan and Dr. Lawrence Aber from New York University) together with the perspective of policy and practice (Dr. Lisa Lauxman of the Division of Youth and 4-H in the US Department of Agriculture). Significantly, the event was also attended by both Cornell faculty and Cornell Cooperative Extension educators from across New York State, resulting in a rich discussion of the relevance of youth development research and its translation to practice. In keeping with the mission of PRYDE, this event featured innovative research and highlighted the importance of partnering with youth-serving organizations in order to understand and improve the lives of youth.

The full event video, including introductory remarks by College of Human Ecology Associate Dean for Research and Outreach  Rachel Dunifon and PRYDE co-directors Anthony Burrow and Karl Pillemer, can be viewed here:

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(0) Comments.  |   Tags: PRYDE    research    video    youth    youth development   

Workshop: Organizing and Managing a Research Project, Wednesday, February 10, 2016

Tags: research,   workshop,  
 
bctr logo

Organizing and Managing a Research Project
BCTR staff

Wednesday, February 10, 2016
1:30 - 2:30 PM
Beebe Hall, 2nd floor conference room



Have you joined a research team or are you gathering data for your own research project? Come learn about and discuss tips and tricks for organizing and managing information about your project. From tracking recruitment and eligibility to setting up a database to documenting data cleaning and analysis steps, managing a research project is more than just collecting and analyzing data. Experienced BCTR staff will present management strategies, discuss lessons learned, and answer questions about your project.

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