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2017 Bronfenbrenner Lecture: Karen Matthews, Thursday, June 15, 2017

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Karen Matthews

Biological Pathways in Childhood Poverty, Health, Well-being, and Behavior
Karen Matthews, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine

Thursday, June 15, 2017
9:00 - 10:00 AM
G71 MVR Hall



There are strong and ubiquitous social gradients in childhood health. This talk will examine underlying biological explanations for social inequalities in child health and lay out some strategies for improving research on these pathways. Professor Matthews will review several physiological systems including HPA axis, cardiovascular, immune, inflammatory, and the sympathetic nervous system. She will then go in detail about sleep, the brain, and metabolic dysregulation including obesity. Ideas for future research will focus both on additional physiological parameters as well as measurement and research design issues.

Dr. Karen Matthews is Distinguished Professor of Psychiatry and Professor of Epidemiology, Psychology, and Clinical and Translational Science at the University of Pittsburgh, where she is Program Director of the Cardiovascular Behavioral Medicine Research Training Program.  Her work addresses the psychosocial and biological pathways connecting sociodemographic factors and poor health; development of cardiovascular behavioral risk factors in childhood and adolescence; the influence of menopause on women’s health; and the role of stress-induced physiological responses and sleep in the etiology of heart disease and hypertension.   Dr. Matthews is a member of the National Academy of Medicine.  She has previously served as Editor-in-Chief of Health Psychology, and as President of the American Psychosomatic Society and the Health Psychology Division of the American Psychological Association (APA).  Dr. Matthews has won a number of honors, including the 2005 American Psychological Association Award for Distinguished Scientific Applications of Psychology and awards from the American Heart Association, APA Health Psychology and Pediatric Psychology Divisions, Society of Behavioral Medicine, North American Menopause Society, American Psychosomatic Society, and the Association of Psychological Science.  She received her B.A. degree from University of California at Berkeley, her Ph. D. from the University of Texas, Austin, and a Ph.D. (Honoris Causa) from University of Helsinki, Finland. 

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2016 John Doris Memorial Lecture

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Adolescent-Parent Relationships: Developmental Processes and Cultural Variations
Wednesday, April 20, 2016

Judith Smetana
Clinical and Social Sciences in Psychology, University of Rochester

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Garbarino’s “Listening to Killers” Talk at Twelve video online

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news-garbarino-inpostFor twenty years James Garbarino has served as a psychological expert witness in criminal and civil cases involving issues of trauma, violence, and children. A former student of Urie Bronfenbrenner's, his approach is to consider the ways developmental processes are shaped by the human ecology in which they occur. On February 9 Garbarino delivered a BCTR Talk at Twelve based on his recent book, Listening to Killers: Lessons Learned from My Twenty Years as a Psychological Expert Witness in Murder Cases. In his talk he recounted specific stories from killers' lives and crimes, serving to demonstrate the ways that untreated early emotional and moral damage can create violent adults. Video from the talk, Listening to Killers: Bringing Developmental Psychology into the Courtroom in Murder Cases, is now available to view online on our YouTube channel, and is embedded below.

In a Cornell Chronicle story about this work and the talk, Garbarino noted,

Most killers should be understood as traumatized children who inhabit and control the minds, hearts and bodies of adult men.

James Garbarino is a Cornell professor emeritus of human development and the Maude C. Clarke Chair in Humanistic Psychology at Loyola University in Chicago.

Garbarino book goes inside the minds of murderers - Cornell Chronicle

 

 

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Talks at Twelve: James Garbarino

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Listening to Killers: Bringing Developmental Psychology into the Courtroom in Murder Cases
Thursday, February 9, 2015

James Garbarino
Psychology, Loyola University Chicago

 

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Talks at Twelve: James Garbarino, Thursday, February 19, 2015

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event-garbarinotalkat2-featured

Listening to Killers: Bringing Developmental Psychology into the Courtroom in Murder Cases
James Garbarino, Loyola University Chicago

Thursday, February 19, 2015
12:00-1:00 PM
Nevin Welcome Center, The Plantations



This talk is open to all. Lunch will be served. Metered parking is available in the Plantations lot.

This presentation is based upon James Garbarino’s 20 years as a psychological expert witness in murder cases. It focuses on his efforts to bridge the gap in legal proceedings between the "social history" typically provided by social work and the "diagnosis" provided by clinical psychology. If offers a "developmental analysis" that seeks to explain detailed accounts of how killers travel a path that leads from childhood innocence to lethal violence in adolescence or adulthood. The presentation places the emotional and moral damage of each individual killer within a larger scientific framework of social, psychological, anthropological, and biological research on human development. In doing so, the presentation highlights the humanity we share with killers and the role of understanding and empathy in breaking the cycle of violence.

Dr. James Garbarino holds the Maude C. Clarke Chair in Humanistic Psychology and was founding Director of the Center for the Human Rights of Children at Loyola University Chicago. Previously he was Elizabeth Lee Vincent Professor of Human Development and Co-Director of the Family Life Development Center at Cornell University. Among the 23 books he has authored or edited are Lost Boys: Why Our Sons Turn Violent and How We Can Save Them (1999) and Listening to Killers: Lessons Learned from My 20 Years as an Expert Psychological Witness in Murder Cases (2015). The National Conference on Child Abuse and Neglect honored Dr. Garbarino in 1985 with its first C. Henry Kempe Award, in recognition of his efforts on behalf of abused and neglected children. In 2011, he received the Max Hayman Award from the American Orthopsychiatric Association for contributions to the prevention of genocide.

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