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Cornell Project 2Gen sponsors early education research


By Sheri Hall for the BCTR

Cornell Project 2Gen sponsored two researchers’ presentations at the Child Care and Early Education Policy Research Consortium meeting last month in Washington D.C.

Portrait of Lisa McCabe

Lisa McCabe

BCTR research associate Lisa McCabe, Cornell sociology professor John Sipple and Cornell alumnae Hope Casto, associate professor of education studies at Skidmore College, gave two presentations to early education scholars on research sponsored by Project 2Gen, which focuses on helping vulnerable families by developing programs that support parents and their children jointly.

The first explored factors related to child care deserts, neighborhoods and communities that are lacking access to child care for working families, particularly for children under 5 years old. The work is in its early stages, McCabe said.

“Project 2Gen has allowed us to expand our work to specifically look at Head Start, regulated child care centers, family child care homes and public pre-kindergarten,” she said. “We are particularly interested in how capacity may vary by rural or urban status and community wealth.”

Their second presentation focused on the challenges in working with administrative data, and various strategies for addressing them.

“As states across the country work to improve and expand their state-wide databases on early care and education, opportunities to use these data for researching policy-relevant trends are increasing,” McCabe said. “Yet working with these large, complex data sets can be difficult.

“By sharing lessons learned in the Project 2Gen work, we hope to facilitate better collaboration between state-level administrators and researchers to promote high-quality research that informs early education policy. “

Project 2Gen works to build a community of scholars focused on 2Gen approaches to support vulnerable families and partners with practitioners and policymakers throughout New York and the nation. Two-generational programs can begin by focusing on children and then add a component to support parents, such as parent education or skills classes. Others may focus on parents, and then add a component for children, such as child care or nutrition support. Still other approaches target systems that influence families, such as schools or workplaces.

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BCTR at the Society for Research on Adolescence meeting


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Stephen Hamilton and Mary Agnes Hamilton

The 15th Biannual Meeting of the Society for Research on Adolescence was held in Austin, TX on March 20, 2014. The 2014 conference theme of Social Justice was addressed by faculty, staff, and students from the BCTR's Cornell Research Program on Self-Injury and RecoveryCornell Youth in Society, and The Role of Grandparents in the Lives of Adolescent Grandchildren.

  • Stephen Hamilton participated in the roundtable discussion, Improving the uses of evidence in working with young people: International perspectives on challenges and opportunities.
  • Stephen Hamilton and  Mary Agnes Hamilton presented a paper, When is a youth program leader a mentor?
  • Kimberly Kopko presented the paper A Dyadic Analysis of Parenting Behaviors and Relationship Quality Among Adolescent Grandchildren and Custodial Grandparents, which was co-authored with Megan L. Dolbin-MacNab and Rachel Dunifon
  • Kemar Prussien, a junior Psychology major and BCTR research assistant, presented a poster co-authored with Janis Whitlock: Parent-Child Agreement in Understanding the What and Why of Child Non-Suicidal Self-Injury.
  • Janis Whitlock and Deinera Exner-Cortens were co-chairs for the media and communications sub-committee, which hosted a pre-conference, Translating Research Evidence to Policy and Practice.
  • Additionally, BCTR faculty affiliates Jane Mendle and Tony Burrow both gave presentations at the conference.

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CRPSIB group presents at International Society for the Study of Self-Injury annual meeting


Whitlock, Purington, and Morgan

Janis Whitlock, Ph.D. (director), Amanda Purington (project coordinator), and Rebecca Morgan (undergraduate research assistant) of the BCTR's Cornell Research Program on Self-Injurious Behavior (CRPSIB) attended and presented at the 7th annual meeting of the International Society for the Study of Self-Injury (ISSS) held at UNC Chapel Hill June 30-July 1. With over 90 attendees, this was the largest meeting of the group to date, with national and international researchers and clinicians attending and presenting, including attendees from Canada, Belgium, Germany, Australia, New Zealand, and Britain.

Whitlock, Purington, and Morgan presented a poster of emerging findings from CRPSIB's recovery interview project, Theoretical Models of Recovery and Their Application to Recovery from Non-Suicidal Self-Injury, in which they described the development of a six-stage model of recovery from non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI).

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CRPSIB at International Society for the Study of Self-Injury Annual Meeting

Tags: CRPSIB,   international,   poster,   presentation,  

The Cornell Research Program on Self-Injurious Behaviors in Adolescents and Young Adults (CRPSIB) was well-represented at this year’s annual meeting of the International Society for the Study of Self-Injury, with one presentation and three posters presented. The presentation, titled “Parent Experiences of Child Self-Injury: Key Processes and Events,” focused on preliminary findings from a current exploratory interview study in which self-injurious young people and their parent(s) are asked about recovery from self-injury and parental roles in the recovery processes. The poster titled “Reaching Out: The Role of Disclosure and Support in Non-Suicidal Self-Injury Cessation” described analyses of qualitative and quantitative data regarding self-injury disclosure to and support from important others and the impact of these on a person’s ability to stop self-injuring. These data come from a large survey, administered to eight colleges across the country. Also pulling from this dataset, the poster “The Ethics of Self-Report Surveys: Assessing Non-Suicidal Self-Injury and Other Sensitive Topics” examined responses of survey participants regarding the experience of taking the survey itself. Finally, the poster “Validity and Reliability of the Non-Suicidal Self-Injury Assessment Tool (NSSI-AT): Why Use the NSSI-AT?” presented support for the use of the NSSI-AT, a survey tool developed by the authors. For more information on these presentations and other work of the CRPSIB, see the project’s publications webpage and the general website.

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