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Using comics to convey research


By Lori Sonken for the Cornell Chronicle

A 3-panel comic showing - panel one: text, "join the NFLC - Spring 2079!" above a group image of student; panel 2: header text "what the hell is the NFLC?" above image of a student with a speech bubble saying, "It's the Nilgiris Field Learning Center in Kotagiri, India!"; panel 3: two students are talking one says, "We study sustainable development and do research in communities with our partners." the other says, "Yep, there are equal numbers of Cornell students and young people from tribal communities in the Nilgiris, like me!"

The first page of a comic Neema Kudva, associate professor in city and regional planning, is using in recruitment efforts for the Nilgiris Field Learning Center in India.

Cornell faculty members and academic staff participating in the Knowledge Matters Fellowship presented their projects, including comics, videos and websites, at a showcase wrapping up the yearlong transmedia training program May 10 at A.D. White House.

“My students said they better understood the papers they read” after creating a comic strip illustrating research and findings from a peer-reviewed journal article, said Jennifer Agans, assistant director of the Program for Research on Youth Development and Engagement at the Bronfenbrenner Center for Translational Research.

Agans asked undergraduates enrolled in Human Development 4850 to make a 12-frame, persuasive comic making the research relevant for nonacademic audiences. Before tackling the assignment, students received instruction in developing comics from Jon McKenzie, the Arts and Sciences Dean’s Fellow for Media and Design and visiting professor of English, who runs the Knowledge Matters Fellowship.

Another Knowledge Matters fellow, C.-Y. Cynthia Lin Lawell, associate professor and the Robert Dyson Sesquicentennial Chair of Resource Economics in the Dyson School of Applied Economics and Management, produced a four-minute video that highlights research in a paper she wrote with a former Ph.D. student in the Journal of Environmental Economics and Management about the effects of driving restrictions on air quality.

Making the video “made me think about how to make the research my students and I are doing interesting and accessible to a general audience,” she said.

To solicit support for a clemency case, Sandra Babcock, faculty director of the Cornell Center on the Death Penalty Worldwide, is developing a PechaKucha – a presentation format that uses narration and 20 slides displaying for 20 seconds each to convey information concisely.

Maureen Hanson, the Liberty Hyde Bailey Professor in the Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, worked with a volunteer WordPress expert to build a website for the Center for Enervating Neuroimmune Disease, which conducts research on myalgic encephalomyelitis and chronic fatigue syndrome, supported by a grant from the National Institutes of Health.

The Knowledge Matters Fellowship, sponsored by the Office of Faculty Development and Diversity (OFDD), Cornell University Library, Office of Engagement Initiatives and the Center for Teaching Innovation,will be offered in 2018-19, said Yael Levitte, associate vice provost for faculty development and diversity. Email OFDD more information.

Faculty uses new formats – including comics – to convey research - Cornell Chronicle

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Doing Translational Research podcast: Jennifer Agans, Friday, May 25, 2018

jennifer agans View Media

Doing Translational Research podcast: Jennifer Agans

Research/Community Partnerships
Monday, December 5, 2016

Jennifer Agans
Bronfenbrenner Center for Translational Research, Cornell University

Tags: 4-H,   Jennifer Agans,   podcast,   PRYDE,   youth,   youth development,  

Research/Community Partnerships
Monday, December 5, 2016

Jennifer Agans
Bronfenbrenner Center for Translational Research, Cornell University

(0) Comments.  |   Tags: 4-H    Jennifer Agans    podcast    PRYDE    youth    youth development   

Talks at Twelve: Jennifer Agans, Friday, May 25, 2018

jennifer agans View Media

Talks at Twelve: Jennifer Agans

The Program for Research on Youth Development and Engagement (PRYDE): Integrating Research and Practice
Thursday, December 8, 2016

Jennifer Agans
BCTR, Cornell University

Tags: 4-H,   Jennifer Agans,   PRYDE,   video,   youth,   youth development,  

The Program for Research on Youth Development and Engagement (PRYDE): Integrating Research and Practice
Thursday, December 8, 2016

Jennifer Agans
BCTR, Cornell University

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Doing Translational Research podcast: Jennifer Agans

Tags: 4-H,   Jennifer Agans,   podcast,   PRYDE,   youth,   youth development,  

podcast agansIn episode 9 of the podcast, Karl welcomes Jen Agans, assistant director of the Program for Research on Youth Development and Engagement (PRYDE). They discuss the importance of research/community partnerships, Agan's research on children's out-of-school time, and Agans explains what exactly the 4-H program is.

Dr. Jennifer Agans is assistant director of PRYDE in the Bronfenbrenner Center. Before coming to Cornell University, she received her Ph.D. and M.A. in child study and human development from Tufts University and her B.A. in psychology from Macalester College. Dr. Agans’ research focuses on youth development within out-of-school time contexts, and her work with PRYDE builds on her interest in bridging youth research and practice.

Ep. 9: Research/Community Partnerships with Jennifer Agans, PRYDE, Cornell - Doing Translational Research podcast

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Talks at Twelve: Jennifer Agans, Thursday, December 8, 2016

Tags: 4-H,   Jennifer Agans,   PRYDE,   youth,   youth development,  
 
jennifer agans

The Program for Research on Youth Development and Engagement (PRYDE): Integrating Research and Practice
Jennifer Agans, BCTR

Thursday, December 8, 2016
12:00 - 1:00 PM
Beebe Hall, 2nd floor conference room



The Program for Research on Youth Development and Engagement (PRYDE) is a relatively new project in the BCTR. Working in partnership with New York State 4-H Youth Development programs, PRYDE strives to understand and improve the lives of today’s youth and promote positive youth development through innovative research and evidence-based approaches. In its first year, PRYDE has received considerable support and encouragement from both campus and county. In this talk Agans will discuss the program’s strategies, progress, and ongoing learning about the process of research-practice collaboration.

Jennifer Agans, Ph.D., is a research associate in the BCTR and the assistant director of the Program for Research on Youth Development and Engagement (PRYDE). Her work with PRYDE focuses on building capacity for campus-county partnerships between researchers at Cornell and 4-H programs across New York State. This work builds on her interests in translational and applied youth development research and the ways in which out-of-school time activities can foster positive youth development.

This talk is open to all. Lunch will be served. Metered parking is available in the Botanical Gardens lot across the road from Beebe Hall. No registration or RSVP required except fo groups of 5 or more. We ask that larger groups email Patty at pmt6@cornell.edu letting us know of your plans to attend so that we can order enough lunch.

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