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RCCP presents at international EUSARF conference


By Sheri Hall for the BCTR

portraits of Martha Holden, Lisa McCabe, and Debbie Sellers

Martha Holden, Lisa McCabe, Debbie Sellers

Staff of the BCTR’s Residential Child Care Project (RCCP) participated in two major symposia at the European Scientific Association on Residential & Family Care for Children and Adolescents (EUSARF) conference in Porto, Portugal last month.

Deborah Sellers, RCCP’s director of research and outreach, and Lisa McCabe, a research associate, joined with researchers from Australia and Canada to discuss research on children’s perceptions of safety and their attitudes toward the adults who care for them.

And RCCP principal investigator and project director Martha Holden and discussed their experiences in implementing the Children and Residential Experiences: Creating Conditions for Change, or CARE, model – an evidence-based program developed by the RCCP to improve the social dynamics in residential care settings.

“The EUSARF conference is one of the most respected and valuable research meetings that we attend.  It brings together a community of worldwide researchers concerned with vulnerable children,” said Martha Holden, a principal investigator with the RCCP who also attended the conference.

In the first symposium – “Perceptions of Safety in Child Welfare: Contrasting Child and Adult Perspectives” – Sellers and McCabe discussed the problems created when youth struggle to form bonds with their adult caregivers.

“The implications are critical for children in out-of-home placements, but are especially crucial for those children placed in therapeutic care since their perception of safety is a requirement for attachment and future developmental relationships,” Holden said.

During this symposium, participants who have a continued interest in examining ethical and methodological issues when studying children’s perceptions of safety formed a community of practice which will continue beyond the three or four days of the formal program.  These communities of practice are supported by technology platforms that allow for meetings to discuss common issues.

In the second symposium – “Implementing and Sustaining Evidence Informed Program Models in Residential Settings: Journey of the CARE Program Model” – RCCP researchers and residential agency directors from Canada, the US and Australia described their experience in building and sustaining the CARE model over the past 10 years. To date, over 50 agencies in the United States, Canada, Australia and Northern Ireland have implemented the CARE program model. The symposium discussed the model and its co-construction with selected organizations and communities worldwide.

The CARE program model is built on principles that encompass developmentally appropriate relationships and trauma-informed care.  It focuses on building family and child competence within ecologically sound environments.

“These program principles demand congruent adult to adult, adult to child, and child to child interactions and interpersonal dynamics that are reciprocal, coherent and congruent through all levels of the organization,” Holden said.

(0) Comments.  |   Tags: CARE    children    conference    Debbie Sellers    international    Lisa McCabe    Martha Holden    RCCP    residential care    youth   

Talks at Twelve: Peter Lloyd-Sherlock, Monday, December 10, 2018

portrait of peter lloyd-sherlock View Media

Talks at Twelve: Peter Lloyd-Sherlock

Researching Unregulated Residential Care Homes in Argentina
October 11, 2017

Peter Lloyd-Sherlock
University of East Anglia, UK


Researching Unregulated Residential Care Homes in Argentina
October 11, 2017

Peter Lloyd-Sherlock
University of East Anglia, UK

(0) Comments.  |   Tags: aging    BCTR Talks at Twelve    gerontology    international   

Doing Translational Research podcast: Peter Lloyd-Sherlock, Monday, December 10, 2018

portrait of peter lloyd-sherlock View Media

Doing Translational Research podcast: Peter Lloyd-Sherlock

Aging and Insecurity
August 16, 2017

Peter Lloyd-Sherlock
University of East Anglia, UK


Aging and Insecurity
August 16, 2017

Peter Lloyd-Sherlock
University of East Anglia, UK

(0) Comments.  |   Tags: aging    doing translational research    health    healthcare    international    podcast    poverty   

Talks at Twelve: T.V. Sekher, Monday, December 10, 2018

portrait of T.V. Sekher View Media

Talks at Twelve: T.V. Sekher

Designing and Implementing the Longitudinal Ageing Study in India
May 25, 2017

T.V. Sekher
International Institute for Population Sciences


Designing and Implementing the Longitudinal Ageing Study in India
May 25, 2017

T.V. Sekher
International Institute for Population Sciences

(0) Comments.  |   Tags: BCTR Talks at Twelve    gerontology    international    video   

ACT hosts visiting scholar from Malaysia


By Sheri Hall for the BCTR

This winter, the BCTR hosted a visiting scholar from Malaysia who shared information about youth development programs in her country.

Professor Haslinda Binti Abdullah is an associate professor and the deputy dean of research and innovation at Universiti Putra Malaysi.

Abdullah spent a week in Washington, D.C. at the American Evaluator Association conference, where she gave a presentation titled “Evaluating Trajectories of Youth-Adult Partnerships in Malaysia and United States” with Jane Powers, the project director of the BCTR’s ACT for Youth Center for Community Action.

Powers and Abdullah shared findings from evaluations of youth-adult partnerships conducted in the U.S. and Malaysia. Their research from both countries demonstrated that when youth and adults learn and act together as partners, they can produce high-quality and sustained efforts that endure over time.

Professor Haslinda Binti Abdullah with ACT for Youth Network members

Professor Haslinda Binti Abdullah (in red) with ACT for Youth Network members

Next, Abdullah visited Ithaca, where she met with BCTR staff for cross-cultural dialogue about youth development programs. And finally, she visited New York City, where she met with Cornell Cooperative Extension youth development practitioners and the ACT for Youth Network, a group of youth consultants who advise the NYS Department of Health and ACT to ensure their materials, resources, and research instruments are youth-friendly.

“It was a rich visit,” Powers said. “Malaysia is a very different society compared to the U.S. It was valuable to learn about the issues that young people face in another part of the world and the types of programming offered. For example, how they handle sex education in a primarily Islamic country.”

“But what was really enlightening to our team was discovering our similarities,” Powers said. “Because despite the differences, we learned that we share more than think.”

Abdullah said that she found the visit insightful, and hopes to continue collaborating with ACT.

“I find it interesting on how technology helps in term of promoting health-related programs organized by the ACT Youth Network,” she said. “And I learned about the reality of what it means for youth in New York to be involved with youth programs such as ACT.”

(2) Comments.  |   Tags: ACT for Youth    international    Jane Powers    youth   

2017 Iscol Lecture: Rebecca Heller, Wednesday, October 18, 2017

 

Get on a Plane! Fighting for Refugees in the Age of Trump
Rebecca Heller, International Refugee Assistance Project

Wednesday, October 18, 2017
7:30 PM
Call Auditorium, Kennedy Hall



Becca Heller, co-founder and director of the International Refugee Assistance Project, will discuss how advocates can fight for the rights of refugees against the waves of right-wing populist xenophobia sweeping through the U.S. and Europe.

  • What obstacles do Syrian and other refugees face in attempting to seek safe passage?
  • How has the politicization of refugees conflated mass migration with terrorist infiltration?
  • And how are a group of lawyers and law students fighting back?

Rebecca M. Heller is a Visiting Clinical Lecturer in Law at Yale Law School. She graduated from Yale Law School in 2010 and received her B.A. from Dartmouth College. She founded and directs the International Refugee Assistance Project (formerly the Iraqi Refugee Assistance Project) at Yale Law School, an organization that assists refugees in applying for resettlement from abroad and adjusting to life in the United States.

Kennedy Hall is at 215 Garden Ave, Ithaca, NY. Call Auditorium is on the first floor.
Parking is available in the garage at 165 Hoy Road.
Admission is free and open to the public.

(0) Comments.  |   Tags: international    Iscol Lecture   

Talks at Twelve: T.V. Sekher, Thursday, May 25, 2017

 
t.v. sekher

Designing and Implementing the Longitudinal Ageing Study in India (LASI)
T.V. Sekher, International Institute for Population Sciences

Thursday, May 25, 2017
12:00-1:00 PM
Beebe Hall, 2nd floor conference room



Data are lacking on the health, social support, and economic security of India’s growing elderly population, and concern is mounting about the well-being of this expanding group. By assembling a research team of demographers, economists, medical doctors, sociologists, and public health and policy experts, the Longitudinal Aging Study in India (LASI) aims to supply the data needed to understand the situation of India’s elderly population. LASI covers a nationally representative sample of 60,000 households to be followed longitudinally. In his talk, Professor Sekher will share how this data will provide a much-needed foundation for scientific research and policy making related to aging in India. LASI is a collaborative venture of the International Institute for Population Sciences, Mumbai, the Harvard School of Public Health, and the University of Southern California.

Dr. T.V. Sekher is a Professor in the Department of Population Policies and Programs at the International Institute for Population Sciences (IIPS), Mumbai. He is the Co-Principal Investigator of the Longitudinal Aging Study in India (LASI) and is also core team member of "Study on Global Ageing and Adult Health (SAGE-India)". He is  currently the Fulbright-Nehru Senior Fellow with SAP, Mario Einaudi Center for International Studies at Cornell University. Trained in Demography and Sociology, his areas of research interests are social demography, gender issues, population ageing, and public health.

(0) Comments.  |   Tags: aging    BCTR Talks at Twelve    international   

Holden receives lifetime achievement award

Tags: award,   international,   Martha Holden,   RCCP,   training,  

holden

The National Staff Development and Training Association (NSDTA) Career Achievement Award is presented to an individual who has made a career commitment to the profession of human service training and development; making significant contributions in terms of leadership, new ideas and education as measured by improved organizational outcomes, impact on the field, or improvement in national best practices at a state or national level. This year’s award recipient is the BCTR's Martha Holden, director of the Residential Child Care Project (RCCP). Martha has made significant contributions to human services through training and development activities throughout her working life.

Over the course of her career, Martha has trained thousands of human service professionals and, through her training of trainers, indirectly impacted many more throughout the U.S., Europe, Israel, and Australia. As noted in her nomination letter, some of her many contributions and achievements include:

  • In the late 1970s and early 1980s, serving as a founding steering committee member of the Ohio Committee for Child Care Worker Training, creating various certification systems and curricula for child and youth care workers
  • As director of the RCCP, she oversaw:
    • The development of several curricula used throughout the U.S., Canada, Europe, Israel and Australia, including:
    • Organizing RCCP International Conferences focusing on child safety and training.
    • The development and use of an organizational development/systems approach. In addition to the training-of-trainers model, the RCCP recognizes the role of training within the organizational system. The RCCP uses tools such as organizational climate inventories to assess the readiness for change and evaluate the impact of training and other organizational interventions such as coaching and team-building. The RCCP curricula is not viewed as a stand-alone intervention but part of a more comprehensive organizational intervention.
  • Serving as co-project leader of the North American Certification Project, Martha co-led the initial efforts to organize more than 100 volunteers to develop the North American certification system.
  • Conducting evaluation and research activities providing evidence of the effectiveness of the RCCP curriculum and organizational interventions
  • Co-authoring publications and conference presentations of research with program, curriculum, and policy implications, for example:
    • Holden, M.J., Izzo, C., Nunno, M., Smith, E., Endres, T., Holden, J.C., & Kuhn, F. (2010). Children and residential experiences: A comprehensive strategy for implementing a researched-informed program model for residential care. Child Welfare, 89(2), 131-149.
    • Nunno, M.A., Holden, M. J., & Tollar, A. (2006). Learning from tragedy: A survey of child and adolescent restraint fatalities. Child Abuse & Neglect:  An International Journal, 30(12), 1333-1342.
    • Nunno, M. A., Holden, M. J., & Leidy, B. (2003). Evaluating and monitoring the impact of a crisis intervention system on a residential child care facility, Children and Youth Services Review, 25(4). 295-315.
  • Developing an international cadre of certified trainers

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(6) Comments.  |   Tags: award    international    Martha Holden    RCCP    training   

Experts address elder financial abuse as global problem


From the Weill Cornell Newsroom:

Clockwise from left: Karl Pillemer, Bridget Penhale, Nelida Redondo, Kendon Conrad, Mark Lachs and Peter Lloyd-Sherlock. Photo: Ira Fox

Clockwise from left: Karl Pillemer, Bridget Penhale, Nelida Redondo, Kendon Conrad, Mark Lachs and Peter Lloyd-Sherlock.
Photo: Ira Fox

Financial exploitation of older people by those who should be protecting them results in devastating health, emotional and psychological consequences. A group of international elder abuse experts met in June at Weill Cornell Medicine to map out a strategy for conducting research on this problem in low and middle income countries.

The meeting, organized by Dr. Mark Lachs, co-chief of the Division of Geriatrics and Palliative Medicine and the Irene F. and I. Roy Psaty Distinguished Professor of Clinical Medicine at Weill Cornell Medicine, and Dr. Karl Pillemer, director of the Bronfenbrenner Center for Translational Research and the Hazel E. Reed Professor in the Department of Human Development at Cornell University, brought together experts from the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, South Africa, and Argentina.

"Over the last few years, studies have found financial abuse and exploitation of older people to be extremely prevalent and extremely harmful for older people," said Dr. Pillemer, who is also a professor of gerontology in medicine at Weill Cornell Medicine. "These studies have mostly been done in the United States, England, and other high income countries, but very little is known about how this problem plays out in low-income countries. Our goal was to bring together research internationally and comparatively to try to understand this problem."

"This issue is an interesting integration of sociology, medicine, economics and geopolitics," said Dr. Lachs, who is director of Weill Cornell Medicine's Center for Aging Research and Clinical Care and director of geriatrics for the New York-Presbyterian Health System. "There has been growing interest here in the United States on financial vulnerability of older people, but I'm unaware of an international group that is focused on this."

One consequence of older people who are being financially exploited is that they cannot meet their own health needs. There are also psychological and emotional consequences because some older people live in fear of relatives who may be exploiting them and may give away much needed pensions to spouses, adult children, and other extended family members.

According to Dr. Pillemer, based on available evidence, 5 to 10 percent of older people globally may experience some kind of financial exploitation. Exploitation can take different forms. In high-income countries, like the United States, the abuse may encompass theft, misuse of power of attorney or denying access to funds. In low-income regions, financial exploitation results from abuse of local laws and cultural norms. For example, in some South American countries, the law requires that children receive the parents’ dwelling, resulting in children moving parents into nursing homes in order to obtain the house. In parts of sub-Saharan Africa, women may be accused of witchcraft in order to seize their property or gain access to their funds.

Government pensions in low-income countries have become a source of income for older people, which puts them at risk for financial exploitation. However, researchers need to be sensitive to local cultural norms in their conduct of research and analysis of data so governments are not hesitant to provide much needed income to older people, according to Dr. Lachs.

"In some of the countries there's a cultural expectation that if the older person has a pension it will be shared with other family members," Dr. Lachs said. "Whereas in my practice, if a patient tells me that a child is asking for some of their pension, it raises the specter of the potential for financial exploitation."

The group, Dr. Pillemer said, concluded that there's a desperate need for new scientific knowledge about the extent, causes and consequences of this problem, as well as a need to understand how the problem of financial exploitation is the same across countries, and how it differs. The group is now working on a white paper to make the case for comparative research on financial exploitation of older people.

"That's important for a very critical reason: By looking at the dynamics of financial abuse in different countries, we can understand how policies affect both how much abuse occurs and how to deal with it," Dr. Pillemer said.

Top (from left): Chelsie Burchett, Bridget Penhale, Karl Pillemer, Janey Peterson, Kendon Conrad, Mark Lachs, Natal Ayiga, Steve Gresham. Bottom (from left): Peter Lloyd-Sherlock, David Burnes, Nelida Redondo. Photo: Ira Fox

Top (from left): Chelsie Burchett, Bridget Penhale, Karl Pillemer, Janey Peterson, Kendon Conrad, Mark Lachs, Natal Ayiga, Steve Gresham. Bottom (from left): Peter Lloyd-Sherlock, David Burnes, Nelida Redondo.
Photo: Ira Fox

In addition to Dr. Pillemer and Dr. Lachs, attendees of the meeting were:

  • Bridget Penhale, Reader in Mental Health, University of East Anglia, UK;
  • Peter Lloyd-Sherlock, Professor of Social Policy and International Development, University of East Anglia, UK;
  • Steve Gresham, Executive Vice President, Private Client Group, Fidelity Investments, and Adjunct Lecturer in
  • International and Public Affairs, Watson Institute, Brown University;
  • David Burnes, Assistant Professor, Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work, University of Toronto;
  • Nelida Redondo, Senior Researcher, Universidad Isalud, Argentina;
  • Natal Ayiga, North-West University, South Africa;
  • Janey Peterson, Associate Professor of Clinical Epidemiology in Medicine, Integrative Medicine and Cardiothoracic Surgery, Weill Cornell Medicine; and
  • Ken Conrad, Professor Emeritus, University of Illinois at Chicago.

The meeting was supported by the Elbrun & Peter Kimmelman Family Foundation, Inc.

Experts Address Elder Financial Abuse as Global Problem - Weill Cornell Newsroom

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(0) Comments.  |   Tags: elder abuse    international    Karl Pillemer    NYC    Weill Cornell   

Talks at Twelve: Peter Fallesen, Monday, December 10, 2018

Peter Fallesen View Media

Talks at Twelve: Peter Fallesen

Noncustodial Alternatives to Imprisonment and Offenders' Union Formations and Dissolutions in Denmark
Wednesday, March 2, 2016

Peter Fallesen
Swedish Institute for Social Research, Stockholm University


Noncustodial Alternatives to Imprisonment and Offenders' Union Formations and Dissolutions in Denmark
Wednesday, March 2, 2016

Peter Fallesen
Swedish Institute for Social Research, Stockholm University

(0) Comments.  |   Tags: BCTR Talks at Twelve    incarceration    international    marriage    video