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Workshop: How to Use Graphs and Data to Inform and Engage Community Partners, Wednesday, April 17, 2019

 

How to Use Graphs and Data to Inform and Engage Community Partners
Elliott G. Smith, Residential Child Care Project

Wednesday, April 17, 2019
12:00-1:30 p.m.
ILR Conference Center, Room 225



To Register:

Please contact Lori Biechele at lb274@cornell.edu
Lunch will be served.
This workshop is open to all Cornell faculty, staff and grad students.


Part of an interactive workshop series

Researchers are increasingly conducting studies in community settings and applying for grants that require documentation of real-world impact. Indeed, some funders now require components such as dissemination plans, stakeholder engagement, or community participation. To meet these new demands, researchers may wish to collaborate with non-academic groups and craft research questions and results that inform practice or policy. This series of interactive workshops shares the Bronfenbrenner Center for Translational Research’s extensive experience conducting research in real-world settings and translating empirical findings into practice. Each workshop addresses a key challenge that researchers face in doing translational research and provides practical tools for overcoming obstacles to conducting effective translational research.

Full 2018-2019 How To workshop series

(0) Comments.  |   Tags: Elliott Smith    How to Do Research in Real-World Settings    workshop   

Workshop: How to Use Video Observation as a Source of Data, Wednesday, March 6, 2019

 

How to Use Video Observation as a Source of Data
Charles Izzo, Residential Child Care Project

Wednesday, March 6, 2019
12:00-1:30 p.m.
ILR Conference Center, Room 423



To Register:

Please contact Lori Biechele at lb274@cornell.edu
Lunch will be served.
This workshop is open to all Cornell faculty, staff and grad students.


Part of an interactive workshop series

Researchers are increasingly conducting studies in community settings and applying for grants that require documentation of real-world impact. Indeed, some funders now require components such as dissemination plans, stakeholder engagement, or community participation. To meet these new demands, researchers may wish to collaborate with non-academic groups and craft research questions and results that inform practice or policy. This series of interactive workshops shares the Bronfenbrenner Center for Translational Research’s extensive experience conducting research in real-world settings and translating empirical findings into practice. Each workshop addresses a key challenge that researchers face in doing translational research and provides practical tools for overcoming obstacles to conducting effective translational research.

Full 2018-2019 How To workshop series

(0) Comments.  |   Tags: Charles Izzo    How to Do Research in Real-World Settings    workshop   

Workshop: How to Plan and Conduct Interviews in Real-World Settings, Tuesday, February 5, 2019

 
image of the text "How to Do Research in Real-World Settings"

How to Plan and Conduct Interviews in Real-World Settings
Amanda Purington and Jane Powers, ACT for Youth

Tuesday, February 5, 2019
12:00-1:30 p.m.
ILR Conference Center, Room 423



To Register:

Please contact Lori Biechele at lb274@cornell.edu
Lunch will be served.
This workshop is open to all Cornell faculty, staff and grad students.


Part of an interactive workshop series

Researchers are increasingly conducting studies in community settings and applying for grants that require documentation of real-world impact. Indeed, some funders now require components such as dissemination plans, stakeholder engagement, or community participation. To meet these new demands, researchers may wish to collaborate with non-academic groups and craft research questions and results that inform practice or policy. This series of interactive workshops shares the Bronfenbrenner Center for Translational Research’s extensive experience conducting research in real-world settings and translating empirical findings into practice. Each workshop addresses a key challenge that researchers face in doing translational research and provides practical tools for overcoming obstacles to conducting effective translational research.

Full 2018-2019 How To workshop series

(0) Comments.  |   Tags: Amanda Purington    How to Do Research in Real-World Settings    workshop   

Workshop: How to Build Research Relationships with Non-Academic Partners, Tuesday, December 4, 2018

 
image of the text "How to Do Research in Real-World Settings"

How to Build Research Relationships with Non-Academic Partners
Karl Pillemer, Senior Associate Dean for Research and Outreach, College of Human Ecology

Tuesday, December 4, 2018
12:00-1:30 p.m.
ILR Conference Center, Room 423



To Register:

Please contact Lori Biechele at lb274@cornell.edu
Lunch will be served.
This workshop is open to all Cornell faculty, staff and grad students.


Part of an interactive workshop series

Researchers are increasingly conducting studies in community settings and applying for grants that require documentation of real-world impact. Indeed, some funders now require components such as dissemination plans, stakeholder engagement, or community participation. To meet these new demands, researchers may wish to collaborate with non-academic groups and craft research questions and results that inform practice or policy. This series of interactive workshops shares the Bronfenbrenner Center for Translational Research’s extensive experience conducting research in real-world settings and translating empirical findings into practice. Each workshop addresses a key challenge that researchers face in doing translational research and provides practical tools for overcoming obstacles to conducting effective translational research.

Full 2018-2019 How To workshop series

(0) Comments.  |   Tags: How to Do Research in Real-World Settings    workshop   

Learn translational research methods in our “How to” Workshops


Cornell researchers, are you interested in an introduction to or discovering more about translational research methods? The BCTR's How to Do Research in Real-World Settings interactive workshop series has you covered! In our third year of offering these workshops, we introduce some new topics and keep the basics in rotation.

Researchers are increasingly conducting studies in community settings and applying for grants that require documentation of real-world impact. Indeed, some funders now require components such as dissemination plans, stakeholder engagement, or community participation. To meet these new demands, researchers may wish to collaborate with non-academic groups and craft research questions and results that inform practice or policy. This year the BCTR continues our series of interactive workshops sharing the center’s extensive experience conducting research in real-world settings and translating empirical findings into practice. Each workshop addresses a key challenge that researchers face in doing translational research and provides practical tools for overcoming obstacles to conducting effective translational research.

The workshops are open to all Cornell faculty, staff, and graduate students.

2018-2019 Series

How to Disseminate Your Research: A Step-by-Step Guide
Wednesday, November 7, 12:00-1:30 p.m.
Room 423, ILR Conference Center
Rhoda Meador, Associate Director, Cornell Institute for Translational Research on Aging

How to Build Research Relationships with Non-Academic Partners
Tuesday, December 4, 12:00-1:30 p.m.
Room 423, ILR Conference Center
Karl Pillemer, Senior Associate Dean for Research and Outreach, College of Human Ecology
Leslie Schultz, Research Support Specialist, Cornell Institute for Translational Research on Aging

How to Plan and Conduct Interviews in Real-World Settings
Tuesday, February 5, 12:00-1:30 p.m.
Room 423, ILR Conference Center
Amanda Purington, Director of Evaluation, ACT for Youth
Jane Powers, Director, ACT for Youth

How to Use Video Observation as a Source of Data
Wednesday, March 6, 12:00-1:30 p.m.
Room 423, ILR Conference Center
Charles Izzo, Research Associate, The Residential Child Care Project

How to Use Graphs and Data to Inform and Engage Community Partners
Wednesday, April 17, 12:00-1:30 p.m.
Room 225, ILR Conference Center
Elliott G. Smith, Research Associate, BCTR and Residential Child Care Project

To Register:

Please contact Lori Biechele at pmt6@cornell.edu
Lunch will be served with each workshop
This workshop is open to all Cornell faculty, staff, and grad students.

(0) Comments.  |   Tags: How to Do Research in Real-World Settings    translational research    workshop   

Interactive workshop series teaches translational research skills


how to workshopsBuilding on a successful first year, the BCTR is pleased to announce the 2017-2018 How to Do Research in Real-World Settings workshop series. This year we cover new ground in the field by introducing new topics, and presenting new information on those already covered. The workshops are tailored for both those who have already participated and newcomers.

Researchers are increasingly conducting studies in community settings and applying for grants that require documentation of real-world impact. Indeed, some funders now require components such as dissemination plans, stakeholder engagement, or community participation. To meet these new demands, researchers may wish to collaborate with non-academic groups and craft research questions and results that inform practice or policy. This year the BCTR continues our series of interactive workshops sharing the center’s extensive experience conducting research in real-world settings and translating empirical findings into practice. Each workshop addresses a key challenge that researchers face in doing translational research and provides practical tools for overcoming obstacles to conducting effective translational research. The workshops are open to all Cornell faculty, staff, and graduate students.


The 2017-2018 series schedule:
all workshops are held in 102 Mann Library

How to Disseminate Your Research: A Step-by-Step Guide
Monday, October 23, 9:00-10:30am
Rhoda Meador, Associate Director, Cornell Institute for Translational Research on Aging

How to Build Research Relationships with Non-Academic Partners
Monday, November 20, 9:00-10:30am
Karl Pillemer, Director, BCTR

How to Use Graphs and Data to Inform and Engage Community Partners
Thursday, February 22, 9:00-10:30am
Elliott G. Smith, Research Associate, BCTR and Residential Child Care Project

How to Conduct Focus Groups: Tools and Skills
Monday, March 12, 12:00-2:00pm
Amanda Purington, Director of Evaluation, ACT for Youth

How to Navigate the Revised Common Rule
Tuesday, April 10, 9:00-10:30am
Elaine Wethington, Associate Director, BCTR; Professor of Human Development and Sociology

To Register:

Please contact Patty Thayer at pmt6@cornell.edu
A meal will be served with each workshop
This workshop is open to all Cornell faculty, staff, and grad students.

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(0) Comments.  |   Tags: How to Do Research in Real-World Settings    workshop   

Workshop: How to Navigate the Revised Common Rule, Tuesday, April 10, 2018

 
how to workshops

How to Navigate the Revised Common Rule
Elaine Wethington, associate director, BCTR

Tuesday, April 10, 2018
9:00-10:30 AM
102 Mann Library



This workshop will summarize proposed changes to US federal regulations for the protection of human participants (scheduled to go into effect in July 2018) and how these regulatory changes may affect the work of researchers who do community-based research and other types of health/clinical research in practice settings. The presentation will also document how federal and foundation funders have already implemented new expectations for research practices based on the pending changes (including changes to standards for informed consent). Workshop attendees will discuss case studies and learn the principles used by IRBs to review studies of this type.

To Register:

Please contact Lori Biechele at lb274@cornell.edu.
Breakfast will be served.
This workshop is open to all Cornell faculty, staff, and grad students.


event-htdrrws-event-image2Part of an interactive workshop series

Researchers are increasingly conducting studies in community settings and applying for grants that require documentation of real-world impact. Indeed, some funders now require components such as dissemination plans, stakeholder engagement, or community participation. To meet these new demands, researchers may wish to collaborate with non-academic groups and craft research questions and results that inform practice or policy. This series of interactive workshops shares the Bronfenbrenner Center for Translational Research’s extensive experience conducting research in real-world settings and translating empirical findings into practice. Each workshop addresses a key challenge that researchers face in doing translational research and provides practical tools for overcoming obstacles to conducting effective translational research.

(0) Comments.  |   Tags: Elaine Wethington    How to Do Research in Real-World Settings    workshop   

Workshop: How to Conduct Focus Groups: Tools and Skills, Monday, March 12, 2018

 
how to workshops

How to Conduct Focus Groups: Tools and Skills
Amanda Purington, director of evaluation, ACT for Youth

Monday, March 12, 2018
12:00-2:00 PM
102 Mann Library



Focus groups are a unique, and sometimes challenging, way to collect qualitative data. Employing this research method, a group of people are asked about their perceptions, opinions, and attitudes in an interactive group setting where participants are free to talk with each other.

This workshop will provide an overview of considerations when planning and conducting focus groups, including: defining a focus group, designing focus group questions, recruiting and preparing for participants, facilitation tips, and analyzing the data.

Registration is now closed

Please contact Lori Biechele at lb274@cornell.edu if you'd like to join the waiting list.
Lunch will be served.
This workshop is open to all Cornell faculty, staff, and grad students.


Part of an interactive workshop series

Researchers are increasingly conducting studies in community settings and applying for grants that require documentation of real-world impact. Indeed, some funders now require components such as dissemination plans, stakeholder engagement, or community participation. To meet these new demands, researchers may wish to collaborate with non-academic groups and craft research questions and results that inform practice or policy. This series of interactive workshops shares the Bronfenbrenner Center for Translational Research’s extensive experience conducting research in real-world settings and translating empirical findings into practice. Each workshop addresses a key challenge that researchers face in doing translational research and provides practical tools for overcoming obstacles to conducting effective translational research.

(1) Comment.  |   Tags: Amanda Purington    How to Do Research in Real-World Settings    workshop   

Workshop: How to Use Graphs and Data to Inform and Engage Community Partners, Thursday, February 22, 2018

 
how to workshops

How to Use Graphs and Data to Inform and Engage Community Partners
Elliott G. Smith, research associate, BCTR and Residential Child Care Project

Thursday, February 22, 2018
9:00-10:30 AM
102 Mann Library



As researchers share their discoveries outside of academia, graphs and data visualizations are valuable methods of communication. When done well, these visualizations can inform by providing context and focusing attention. Before they can influence decision-making and guide effective action, however, they must rely on data that are relevant, timely, and trustworthy. These are key criteria for community organizations who are committed to effective implementation.

In this workshop, participants will

  1. learn about the Data – Understanding – Action pathway,
  2. review common data presentation mistakes that community partners find disengaging, and
  3. discuss guiding principles, tools, and techniques for creating engaging graphs.

Smith will provide examples from his own work, and participants are encouraged to share their own stories.

Elliott G. Smith is a research associate in the Bronfenbrenner Center for Translational Research,  and a statistician and CARE data specialist with the Residential Child Care Project.

Registration is now closed

Please contact Lori Biechele at lb274@cornell.edu if you'd like to join the waiting list.
Breakfast will be served.
This workshop is open to all Cornell faculty, staff, and grad students.


event-htdrrws-event-image2Part of an interactive workshop series

Researchers are increasingly conducting studies in community settings and applying for grants that require documentation of real-world impact. Indeed, some funders now require components such as dissemination plans, stakeholder engagement, or community participation. To meet these new demands, researchers may wish to collaborate with non-academic groups and craft research questions and results that inform practice or policy. This series of interactive workshops shares the Bronfenbrenner Center for Translational Research’s extensive experience conducting research in real-world settings and translating empirical findings into practice. Each workshop addresses a key challenge that researchers face in doing translational research and provides practical tools for overcoming obstacles to conducting effective translational research.

(0) Comments.  |   Tags: Elliott Smith    How to Do Research in Real-World Settings    RCCP    workshop   

Workshop: How to Build Research Relationships with Non-Academic Partners, Monday, November 20, 2017

 
how to workshops

How to Build Research Relationships with Non-Academic Partners
Karl Pillemer, director, BCTR

Monday, November 20, 2017
9:00-10:30 AM
102 Mann Library



This workshop will explore how researchers can build productive partnerships and avoid difficulties when conducting studies with non-academic organizations and agencies. We will examine common problems that arise in research projects in community settings, including differences in goals, organizational structure, timelines, and dissemination priorities. The workshop will feature examples of solutions to these problems, using methods for developing mutually beneficial community partnerships with agencies. This workshop is interactive so bring your questions, issues you have encountered doing research with community agencies, and lessons learned.

To Register:

Please contact Patty Thayer at pmt6@cornell.edu
Breakfast will be served
This workshop is open to all Cornell faculty, staff, and grad students.


how to workshopsPart of an interactive workshop series

Researchers are increasingly conducting studies in community settings and applying for grants that require documentation of real-world impact. Indeed, some funders now require components such as dissemination plans, stakeholder engagement, or community participation. To meet these new demands, researchers may wish to collaborate with non-academic groups and craft research questions and results that inform practice or policy. This series of interactive workshops shares the Bronfenbrenner Center for Translational Research’s extensive experience conducting research in real-world settings and translating empirical findings into practice. Each workshop addresses a key challenge that researchers face in doing translational research and provides practical tools for overcoming obstacles to conducting effective translational research.

Full 2017-2018 How To workshop series

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