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Interactive workshop series teaches translational research skills

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how to workshopsBuilding on a successful first year, the BCTR is pleased to announce the 2017-2018 How to Do Research in Real-World Settings workshop series. This year we cover new ground in the field by introducing new topics, and presenting new information on those already covered. The workshops are tailored for both those who have already participated and newcomers.

Researchers are increasingly conducting studies in community settings and applying for grants that require documentation of real-world impact. Indeed, some funders now require components such as dissemination plans, stakeholder engagement, or community participation. To meet these new demands, researchers may wish to collaborate with non-academic groups and craft research questions and results that inform practice or policy. This year the BCTR continues our series of interactive workshops sharing the center’s extensive experience conducting research in real-world settings and translating empirical findings into practice. Each workshop addresses a key challenge that researchers face in doing translational research and provides practical tools for overcoming obstacles to conducting effective translational research. The workshops are open to all Cornell faculty, staff, and graduate students.


The series schedule:
all workshops are held in 102 Mann Library

How to Disseminate Your Research: A Step-by-Step Guide
Monday, October 23, 9:00-10:30am
Rhoda Meador, Associate Director, Cornell Institute for Translational Research on Aging

How to Build Research Relationships with Non-Academic Partners
Monday, November 20, 9:00-10:30am
Karl Pillemer, Director, BCTR

How to Use Graphs and Data to Inform and Engage Community Partners
Thursday, February 22, 9:00-10:30am
Elliott G. Smith, Research Associate, BCTR and Residential Child Care Project

How to Conduct Focus Groups: Tools and Skills
Monday, March 12, 12:00-2:00pm
Amanda Purington, Director of Evaluation, ACT for Youth

How to Navigate the Revised Common Rule
Tuesday, April 10, 9:00-10:30am
Elaine Wethington, Associate Director, BCTR; Professor of Human Development and Sociology

To Register:

Please contact Patty Thayer at pmt6@cornell.edu
A meal will be served with each workshop
This workshop is open to all Cornell faculty, staff, and grad students.

 

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How to Navigate the Revised Common Rule, Tuesday, April 10, 2018

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How to Navigate the Revised Common Rule
Elaine Wethington, associate director, BCTR

Tuesday, April 10, 2018
9:00-10:30 AM
102 Mann Library



Researchers are increasingly conducting studies in community settings and applying for grants that require documentation of real-world impact. Indeed, some funders now require components such as dissemination plans, stakeholder engagement, or community participation. To meet these new demands, researchers may wish to collaborate with non-academic groups and craft research questions and results that inform practice or policy. This year the BCTR continues our series of interactive workshops sharing the center’s extensive experience conducting research in real-world settings and translating empirical findings into practice. Each workshop addresses a key challenge that researchers face in doing translational research and provides practical tools for overcoming obstacles to conducting effective translational research. The workshops are open to all Cornell faculty, staff, and graduate students.

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How to Conduct Focus Groups: Tools and Skills, Monday, March 12, 2018

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How to Conduct Focus Groups: Tools and Skills
Amanda Purington, director of evaluation, ACT for Youth

Monday, March 12, 2018
12:00-2:00 PM
102 Mann Library



Researchers are increasingly conducting studies in community settings and applying for grants that require documentation of real-world impact. Indeed, some funders now require components such as dissemination plans, stakeholder engagement, or community participation. To meet these new demands, researchers may wish to collaborate with non-academic groups and craft research questions and results that inform practice or policy. This year the BCTR continues our series of interactive workshops sharing the center’s extensive experience conducting research in real-world settings and translating empirical findings into practice. Each workshop addresses a key challenge that researchers face in doing translational research and provides practical tools for overcoming obstacles to conducting effective translational research. The workshops are open to all Cornell faculty, staff, and graduate students.

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How to Use Graphs and Data to Inform and Engage Community Partners, Thursday, February 22, 2018

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How to Use Graphs and Data to Inform and Engage Community Partners
Elliott G. Smith, research associate, BCTR and Residential Child Care Project

Thursday, February 22, 2018
9:00-10:30 AM
102 Mann Library



Researchers are increasingly conducting studies in community settings and applying for grants that require documentation of real-world impact. Indeed, some funders now require components such as dissemination plans, stakeholder engagement, or community participation. To meet these new demands, researchers may wish to collaborate with non-academic groups and craft research questions and results that inform practice or policy. This year the BCTR continues our series of interactive workshops sharing the center’s extensive experience conducting research in real-world settings and translating empirical findings into practice. Each workshop addresses a key challenge that researchers face in doing translational research and provides practical tools for overcoming obstacles to conducting effective translational research. The workshops are open to all Cornell faculty, staff, and graduate students.

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How to Build Research Relationships with Non-Academic Partners, Monday, November 20, 2017

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How to Build Research Relationships with Non-Academic Partners
Karl Pillemer, director, BCTR

Monday, November 20, 2017
9:00-10:30 AM
102 Mann Library



This workshop will explore how researchers can build productive partnerships and avoid difficulties when conducting studies with non-academic organizations and agencies. We will examine common problems that arise in research projects in community settings, including differences in goals, organizational structure, timelines, and dissemination priorities. The workshop will feature examples of solutions to these problems, using methods for developing mutually beneficial community partnerships with agencies. This workshop is interactive so bring your questions, issues you have encountered doing research with community agencies, and lessons learned.

To Register:

Please contact Patty Thayer at pmt6@cornell.edu
Breakfast will be served
This workshop is open to all Cornell faculty, staff, and grad students.

 


how to workshopsPart of an interactive workshop series

Researchers are increasingly conducting studies in community settings and applying for grants that require documentation of real-world impact. Indeed, some funders now require components such as dissemination plans, stakeholder engagement, or community participation. To meet these new demands, researchers may wish to collaborate with non-academic groups and craft research questions and results that inform practice or policy. This series of interactive workshops shares the Bronfenbrenner Center for Translational Research’s extensive experience conducting research in real-world settings and translating empirical findings into practice. Each workshop addresses a key challenge that researchers face in doing translational research and provides practical tools for overcoming obstacles to conducting effective translational research.

Full 2017-2018 How To workshop series

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How to Disseminate Your Research: A Step-by-Step Guide, Monday, October 23, 2017

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How to Disseminate Your Research: A Step-by-Step Guide
Rhoda Meador, associate director, Cornell Institute for Translational Research on Aging

Monday, October 23, 2017
9:00-10:30 AM
102 Mann Library



To be most effective, dissemination should be incorporated into the earliest stages of a research study. In this workshop, participants will work through the process of creating their own dissemination plan, including consideration of several key issues:

  • Strategic Thinking
  • Writing for diverse audiences
  • Listening to potential stakeholders

event-meador-inpostRhoda Meador, Associate Director, Cornell Institute for Translational Research on Aging

Dr. Rhoda Meador has been involved in numerous educational programs and research activities that bridge the gap between research and practice. Currently her research focuses on improving health and social systems to support the social engagement of older people. Dr. Meador has a Ph.D. in Consumer and Family Sciences from Iowa State University, an M.S.in adult learning from Marshall University and certification as a distance-learning specialist from the University of Wisconsin. She is the former Director of the Ithaca College Gerontology Institute

To Register:

Please contact Patty Thayer at pmt6@cornell.edu
Breakfast will be served
This workshop is open to all Cornell faculty, staff, and grad students.

 

how to workshopsPart of an interactive workshop series

Researchers are increasingly conducting studies in community settings and applying for grants that require documentation of real-world impact. Indeed, some funders now require components such as dissemination plans, stakeholder engagement, or community participation. To meet these new demands, researchers may wish to collaborate with non-academic groups and craft research questions and results that inform practice or policy. This series of interactive workshops shares the Bronfenbrenner Center for Translational Research’s extensive experience conducting research in real-world settings and translating empirical findings into practice. Each workshop addresses a key challenge that researchers face in doing translational research and provides practical tools for overcoming obstacles to conducting effective translational research.

Full 2017-2018 How To workshop series

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Workshop: How to Recruit Diverse Participants, Wednesday, February 15, 2017

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How to Recruit Diverse Participants
Jennifer Tiffany and Eduardo Gonzalez, CUCE-NYC

Wednesday, February 15, 2017
12:00-1:30 PM
157 MVR Hall



This interactive workshop will explore the engagement, recruitment, and retention of diverse participants in the context of partnerships with organizations, agencies, and communities. We will walk you through a step-by-step process that supports successful recruitment efforts. Guided by the interests of workshop participants, discussion may focus on studies involving populations with distinct perspectives and needs (e.g., seniors, youth, immigrants, or teachers). The workshop will also address challenges related to retention because, in many studies, continued engagement for follow-up phases is as crucial as initial recruitment.

Jennifer Tiffany is executive director of Cornell University Cooperative Extension's New York City Programs, director of outreach and community engagement for the BCTR, and co-director of the Community Engagement in Research component of Weill Cornell Medical College's Clinical and Translational Sciences Center, working to promote the translation of Cornell’s research to communities throughout New York State and beyond at the same time as working to increase community members’, policy makers', and practitioners’ participation in developing research projects and agendas. Many of her scholarly articles focus on youth participation and HIV risk reduction. She holds a Ph.D. in City and Regional Planning from Cornell University.

Eduardo González, Jr. is the state diversity, research partnership development, and youth development specialist for Cornell Cooperative Extension - NYC at Cornell University. Mr. González is assists staff, managers, administrators and their respective organizations in developing the awareness, understanding, and skills to support and/or provide leadership in organizational change efforts on diversity and inclusion.
Eduardo holds a bachelor's in human services and a master’s in public administration from Pace University. Mr. González is a past fellow of the W.K. Kellogg Foundation International Fellowship in Community Development sponsored by Partners of the Americas. He is a Cornell Certified Diversity Professional (CCDP) and holds a certificate in Diversity Management from Cornell University’s School of Industrial and Labor Relations.

To Register:

Please contact Patty Thayer at pmt6@cornell.edu
Lunch will be served.
This workshop is open to all Cornell faculty, staff, and grad students.

 

event-htdrrws-event-image2Part of an interactive workshop series

Researchers are increasingly conducting studies in community settings and applying for grants that require documentation of real-world impact. Indeed, some funders now require components such as dissemination plans, stakeholder engagement, or community participation. To meet these new demands, researchers may wish to collaborate with non-academic groups and craft research questions and results that inform practice or policy. This series of interactive workshops shares the Bronfenbrenner Center for Translational Research’s extensive experience conducting research in real-world settings and translating empirical findings into practice. Each workshop addresses a key challenge that researchers face in doing translational research and provides practical tools for overcoming obstacles to conducting effective translational research.

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Workshop: How to Address IRB Issues in Translational Research, Tuesday, April 11, 2017

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How to Address IRB Issues in Translational Research
Elaine Wethington, BCTR

Tuesday, April 11, 2017
8:30-10:00 AM
G87 MVR Hall



In this workshop you will learn how to present a community-based translational research study to an institutional review board (IRB) for human participants. We’ll cover the federal regulations and guidance documents that are relevant to IRB review of community-based studies. Workshop attendees will discuss case studies and learn the principles used by IRBs to review studies of this type. Greater knowledge of the IRB process may help participants prevent review delays. Workshop participants will also learn how the pending revision of the Common Rule may impact the review of community-based translational studies.

Elaine Wethington, Associate Director, BCTR; Professor of Human Development and Sociology

To Register:

Please contact Patty Thayer at pmt6@cornell.edu
Lunch will be served.
This workshop is open to all Cornell faculty, staff, and grad students.

 

event-htdrrws-event-image2Part of an interactive workshop series

Researchers are increasingly conducting studies in community settings and applying for grants that require documentation of real-world impact. Indeed, some funders now require components such as dissemination plans, stakeholder engagement, or community participation. To meet these new demands, researchers may wish to collaborate with non-academic groups and craft research questions and results that inform practice or policy. This series of interactive workshops shares the Bronfenbrenner Center for Translational Research’s extensive experience conducting research in real-world settings and translating empirical findings into practice. Each workshop addresses a key challenge that researchers face in doing translational research and provides practical tools for overcoming obstacles to conducting effective translational research.

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Workshop: How to Conduct Focus Groups, Tuesday, March 14, 2017

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How to Conduct Focus Groups
Jane Powers and Mandy Purington, ACT for Youth

Tuesday, March 14, 2017
12:00-2:00 PM
166 MVR Hall



Focus groups are a unique, and sometimes challenging, way to collect qualitative data. During a focus group, participants are asked about their perceptions, opinions, and attitudes in an interactive group setting. This workshop will provide an overview of planning and conducting focus groups, including:

  • defining a focus group
  • designing focus group questions
  • recruiting and preparing for participants
  • facilitation tips and
  • analyzing the data.

Jane Powers, Director, ACT for Youth
Amanda Purington, Amanda Purington, Director of Evaluation & Research, ACT for Youth

To Register:

Please contact Patty Thayer at pmt6@cornell.edu
Lunch will be served.
This workshop is open to all Cornell faculty, staff, and grad students.

 

event-htdrrws-event-image2Part of an interactive workshop series

Researchers are increasingly conducting studies in community settings and applying for grants that require documentation of real-world impact. Indeed, some funders now require components such as dissemination plans, stakeholder engagement, or community participation. To meet these new demands, researchers may wish to collaborate with non-academic groups and craft research questions and results that inform practice or policy. This series of interactive workshops shares the Bronfenbrenner Center for Translational Research’s extensive experience conducting research in real-world settings and translating empirical findings into practice. Each workshop addresses a key challenge that researchers face in doing translational research and provides practical tools for overcoming obstacles to conducting effective translational research.

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Workshop: How to Build Research Relationships with Non-Academic Partners, Tuesday, December 6, 2016

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How to Build Research Relationships with Non-Academic Partners
Karl Pillemer, BCTR; Jane Powers, ACT for Youth; Martha Holden, RCCP

Tuesday, December 6, 2016
12:00-1:30 PM
Location TBA



Researchers often find it necessary to carry out their work in collaboration with non-academic partners. They may wish to conduct surveys, experiments, interview projects, or intervention studies with populations reachable through community organizations (e.g., schools, health providers, human service agencies, residential care facilities, businesses). Although such relationships can be rewarding, they also provide challenges for academic researchers not used to working in these settings.

This workshop will examine how researchers can build productive partnerships and avoid difficulties in relationships with non-academic organizations and agencies. A panel discussion will feature three programs with extensive experience in conducting research and evaluation projects involving community partnerships. Workshop panelists will share lessons learned about the critical elements of building successful field collaborations using examples drawn from working with community-based organizations around aging, adolescent sexual health, and youth in residential care centers. This workshop is interactive so bring your questions, issues you have encountered, and lessons learned.

Panelists:
Karl Pillemer, Director, Bronfenbrenner Center for Translational Research
Jane Powers, Director, ACT for Youth Center of Excellence
Martha Holden, Director, Residential Child Care Project

This workshop is open to all Cornell faculty, staff, and grad students. Please RSVP to Patty Thayer at pmt6@cornell.edu
Lunch will be served.

 

event-htdrrws-event-image2Part of an interactive workshop series

Researchers are increasingly conducting studies in community settings and applying for grants that require documentation of real-world impact. Indeed, some funders now require components such as dissemination plans, stakeholder engagement, or community participation. To meet these new demands, researchers may wish to collaborate with non-academic groups and craft research questions and results that inform practice or policy. This series of interactive workshops shares the Bronfenbrenner Center for Translational Research’s extensive experience conducting research in real-world settings and translating empirical findings into practice. Each workshop addresses a key challenge that researchers face in doing translational research and provides practical tools for overcoming obstacles to conducting effective translational research.

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(0) Comments.  |   Tags: How to Do Research in Real-World Settings    translational research    workshop   
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