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Talks at Twelve: Peter Fallesen, Wednesday, March 2, 2016

 
fallesen

Noncustodial Alternatives to Imprisonment and Offenders' Union Formations and Dissolutions in Denmark
Peter Fallesen, Stockholm University

Wednesday, March 2, 2016
12:00 - 1:00 PM
Beebe Hall, 2nd floor conference room



Romantic relationships lower offenders’ risk of recidivism. Yet, at the same time, previously incarcerated people do worse on the marriage market, and are more likely to remain single or experience a divorce. By analyzing a recent Danish policy that introduced a noncustodial alternative to imprisonment—electronic monitoring and home confinement— we show that electronic monitoring significantly and persistently lowered the risk both of being single and of becoming single during the first four years following an offender’s criminal conviction. The results highlight that a tool used to promote decarceration trends also secures better relationship outcomes of convicted men.

Peter Fallesen received his PhD in Sociology from University of Copenhagen in 2015. He is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Swedish Institute for Social Research at Stockholm University and a Senior Researcher at the Rockwool Foundation Research Unit in Copenhagen. He works primarily in the fields of family demography and social stratification. His present research interests revolve around how temporal and intergenerational connections between child welfare services, mental health services, and the criminal justice system create and maintain social inequalities. Recent work has appeared in Journal of Health and Social Behavior and Child Abuse & Neglect.

This talk is open to all. Lunch will be served. Metered parking is available in the Plantations lot across the road from Beebe Hall. No registration or RSVP required except for groups of 5 or more. We ask that larger groups email Patty at pmt6@cornell.edu letting us know of your plans to attend so that we can order enough lunch.

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Garbarino’s “Listening to Killers” Talk at Twelve video online


news-garbarino-inpostFor twenty years James Garbarino has served as a psychological expert witness in criminal and civil cases involving issues of trauma, violence, and children. A former student of Urie Bronfenbrenner's, his approach is to consider the ways developmental processes are shaped by the human ecology in which they occur. On February 9 Garbarino delivered a BCTR Talk at Twelve based on his recent book, Listening to Killers: Lessons Learned from My Twenty Years as a Psychological Expert Witness in Murder Cases. In his talk he recounted specific stories from killers' lives and crimes, serving to demonstrate the ways that untreated early emotional and moral damage can create violent adults. Video from the talk, Listening to Killers: Bringing Developmental Psychology into the Courtroom in Murder Cases, is now available to view online on our YouTube channel, and is embedded below.

In a Cornell Chronicle story about this work and the talk, Garbarino noted,

Most killers should be understood as traumatized children who inhabit and control the minds, hearts and bodies of adult men.

James Garbarino is a Cornell professor emeritus of human development and the Maude C. Clarke Chair in Humanistic Psychology at Loyola University in Chicago.

Garbarino book goes inside the minds of murderers - Cornell Chronicle

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Talks at Twelve: James Garbarino, Wednesday, November 14, 2018

portrait of james garbarino View Media

Talks at Twelve: James Garbarino

Listening to Killers: Bringing Developmental Psychology into the Courtroom in Murder Cases
Thursday, February 9, 2015

James Garbarino
Psychology, Loyola University Chicago


Listening to Killers: Bringing Developmental Psychology into the Courtroom in Murder Cases
Thursday, February 9, 2015

James Garbarino
Psychology, Loyola University Chicago

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Talks at Twelve: James Garbarino, Thursday, February 19, 2015

 
portrait of James Garbarino

Listening to Killers: Bringing Developmental Psychology into the Courtroom in Murder Cases
James Garbarino, Loyola University Chicago

Thursday, February 19, 2015
12:00-1:00 PM
Nevin Welcome Center, The Plantations



This talk is open to all. Lunch will be served. Metered parking is available in the Plantations lot.

This presentation is based upon James Garbarino’s 20 years as a psychological expert witness in murder cases. It focuses on his efforts to bridge the gap in legal proceedings between the "social history" typically provided by social work and the "diagnosis" provided by clinical psychology. If offers a "developmental analysis" that seeks to explain detailed accounts of how killers travel a path that leads from childhood innocence to lethal violence in adolescence or adulthood. The presentation places the emotional and moral damage of each individual killer within a larger scientific framework of social, psychological, anthropological, and biological research on human development. In doing so, the presentation highlights the humanity we share with killers and the role of understanding and empathy in breaking the cycle of violence.

Dr. James Garbarino holds the Maude C. Clarke Chair in Humanistic Psychology and was founding Director of the Center for the Human Rights of Children at Loyola University Chicago. Previously he was Elizabeth Lee Vincent Professor of Human Development and Co-Director of the Family Life Development Center at Cornell University. Among the 23 books he has authored or edited are Lost Boys: Why Our Sons Turn Violent and How We Can Save Them (1999) and Listening to Killers: Lessons Learned from My 20 Years as an Expert Psychological Witness in Murder Cases (2015). The National Conference on Child Abuse and Neglect honored Dr. Garbarino in 1985 with its first C. Henry Kempe Award, in recognition of his efforts on behalf of abused and neglected children. In 2011, he received the Max Hayman Award from the American Orthopsychiatric Association for contributions to the prevention of genocide.

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