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Research on later life pain and mood presented at meeting

Tags: aging,   conference,   Elaine Wethington,   pain,   TRIPLL,  

Researchers from across Cornell and investigators affiliated with the BCTR’s Translational Research Institute on Pain in Later Life (TRIPLL) shared new research findings earlier this month at the Gerontological Society of America’s annual scientific meeting in Boston.

TRIPLL is one of the most active and long-standing collaborations among the Cornell campuses. It comprising researchers and graduate students from the Bronfenbrenner Center for Translational Research, Weill Cornell Medicine and Cornell Tech. The investigators presented research on barriers to older adults receiving mental health care at the end of life, why older adults seek information and make the decisions they do and an intergenerational program that teaches youth to interview older adults to learn life lessons.

portrait of Elaine Wethington

Elaine Wethington

“The Gerontological Society of America meeting is the leading international venue for presenting new findings on aging and health to our scientific peers” said Professor Elaine Wethington, one of the co-directors of TRIPLL and director the pilot study program. “It is an opportunity to showcase the work of our pilot investigators and to network with the world’s leading gerontologists. “

Much of the research presented by TRIPPL focused on the relationship between pain, mood and psychological distress and methods for managing chronic pain besides medications.

A TRIPLL-sponsored symposium looked specifically at developing and testing innovative pain interventions that do not involve taking medications. Researchers documented the psychological elements of pain and how cognitive-behavioral interventions can change patients’ perception of pain. They also found that coping skills training, step monitoring and goal-setting to encourage exercise were the intervention activities most likely to lead to pain relief among older adults.

One study, led by human development graduate student Abby Yip and associate professor Corinna Loeckenhoff, demonstrated how positive and negative emotions are associated with pain on a daily basis. TRIPPL researchers sent daily surveys to older adults with chronic pain to measure their mood and pain experiences. They found that patients who experienced positive feelings experienced less pain. They also found that experiencing negative emotions in the context of pain was associated with maladaptive coping strategies, such as avoiding physical activity, which may worsen pain in the long run.

TRIPPL pilot investigator Dr. Una Makris also reported on an intervention designed to improve outcomes of disability and depression in older veterans with chronic low-back pain and depression. The intervention will involve telephone calls from a health coach to encourage physical activity.

TRIPLL was founded in 2009 with a grant from the National Institute on Aging. It is one of 12 federally-funded Edward R. Roybal Centers for Translation of the Behavioral and Social Sciences of Aging across the nation; each one focuses on a different aspect related to the health and well-being of older Americans.

The institute brings together faculty from a variety of disciplines, including the social and behavioral sciences, gerontology, clinical medicine, epidemiology, and computer science to focus on non-pharmacologic methods of pain relief.

(0) Comments.  |   Tags: aging    conference    Elaine Wethington    pain    TRIPLL   

RCCP presents at international EUSARF conference


By Sheri Hall for the BCTR

portraits of Martha Holden, Lisa McCabe, and Debbie Sellers

Martha Holden, Lisa McCabe, Debbie Sellers

Staff of the BCTR’s Residential Child Care Project (RCCP) participated in two major symposia at the European Scientific Association on Residential & Family Care for Children and Adolescents (EUSARF) conference in Porto, Portugal last month.

Deborah Sellers, RCCP’s director of research and outreach, and Lisa McCabe, a research associate, joined with researchers from Australia and Canada to discuss research on children’s perceptions of safety and their attitudes toward the adults who care for them.

And RCCP principal investigator and project director Martha Holden and discussed their experiences in implementing the Children and Residential Experiences: Creating Conditions for Change, or CARE, model – an evidence-based program developed by the RCCP to improve the social dynamics in residential care settings.

“The EUSARF conference is one of the most respected and valuable research meetings that we attend.  It brings together a community of worldwide researchers concerned with vulnerable children,” said Martha Holden, a principal investigator with the RCCP who also attended the conference.

In the first symposium – “Perceptions of Safety in Child Welfare: Contrasting Child and Adult Perspectives” – Sellers and McCabe discussed the problems created when youth struggle to form bonds with their adult caregivers.

“The implications are critical for children in out-of-home placements, but are especially crucial for those children placed in therapeutic care since their perception of safety is a requirement for attachment and future developmental relationships,” Holden said.

During this symposium, participants who have a continued interest in examining ethical and methodological issues when studying children’s perceptions of safety formed a community of practice which will continue beyond the three or four days of the formal program.  These communities of practice are supported by technology platforms that allow for meetings to discuss common issues.

In the second symposium – “Implementing and Sustaining Evidence Informed Program Models in Residential Settings: Journey of the CARE Program Model” – RCCP researchers and residential agency directors from Canada, the US and Australia described their experience in building and sustaining the CARE model over the past 10 years. To date, over 50 agencies in the United States, Canada, Australia and Northern Ireland have implemented the CARE program model. The symposium discussed the model and its co-construction with selected organizations and communities worldwide.

The CARE program model is built on principles that encompass developmentally appropriate relationships and trauma-informed care.  It focuses on building family and child competence within ecologically sound environments.

“These program principles demand congruent adult to adult, adult to child, and child to child interactions and interpersonal dynamics that are reciprocal, coherent and congruent through all levels of the organization,” Holden said.

(0) Comments.  |   Tags: CARE    children    conference    Debbie Sellers    international    Lisa McCabe    Martha Holden    RCCP    residential care    youth   

Conference spotlights equality of opportunity for children


18 Bronfenbrenner Conference speakers and organizers pose on a patio overlooking Cayuga Lake

Conference speakers and organizers braving the cold. front row l to r: Jens Ludwig, Stefanie DeLuca, Janet Currie, Laura Tach, Darrick Hamilton, Ariel Kalil, Cybele Raver, Rachel Dunifon, Anna Rhodes, Allison Young, Chloe East; back row: C. Kirabo Jackson, Timothy Nelson, Tyler Watts, Gary Evans, Doug Miller, Sean Reardon, Marianne Page. photo: Heather Ainsworth

By Stephen D'Angelo for the Cornell Chronicle

As inequality continues to grow in the United States and around the world, a national conference at Cornell Oct. 25-26 shined the spotlight on how to create equality of opportunity for children.

“An Equal Start: Policy and Practice to Promote Equality of Opportunity for Children” was the topic of the sixth biennial Urie Bronfenbrenner Conference, featuring a multidisciplinary mix of scholars from more than a dozen institutions and programs.

“We will be hearing some of the latest and most exciting research focused on policies and programs that enhance opportunities and promote equality for children,” said Rachel Dunifon, interim dean of the College of Human Ecology and conference co-organizer. “The papers presented here will certainly reflect Urie Bronfenbrenner’s ecological model of human development, which emphasized the multiple layers of influence that come together to support individual development.”

The conference convened a collection of leading researchers in an effort to cultivate interdisciplinary perspectives and consider micro-, meso- and macro-level interventions that best build opportunities for children to have an equal start in life.

Darrick Hamilton speaking

Darrick Hamilton of The New School for Social Research presenting.
photo: Heather Ainsworth

The conference’s major topic areas included Innovations in Transfer Programs for Children, Making the Safety Net Work for Families, Education and Equality of Opportunity, and Multigenerational Influences of Child Development. Research centered on policy and practice in families, schools, neighborhoods, programs and policies; presentations were organized and structured to help move the field forward in terms of how scholars think holistically about promoting equality for children.

“We charged the presenters with answering the question: What does it take to equalize opportunity for children? We asked them to be bold, and they did not disappoint,” said Laura Tach, associate professor of policy analysis and management and conference co-organizer. “They showcased cutting-edge policies and programs, from behavioral ‘nudges’ to improve parenting to ‘baby trusts’ that reduce intergenerational wealth inequality. Collectively, they showed us how social science can inform policy and practice in ways that are both innovative and evidence-based.”

The conference series and the Bronfenbrenner Center for Translational Research (BCTR) are named for Urie Bronfenbrenner (1917-2005), the renowned developmental psychologist who taught at Cornell for more than 50 years and developed the ecological systems theory.

“This system, this ecological perspective from Bronfenbrenner, may give us another avenue to think about policies and practices that may improve children’s lives, and make a difference in some of their trajectories,” said Gary Evans, an environmental and developmental psychologist and the Elizabeth Lee Vincent Professor at the College of Human Ecology. “That, of course, is why all of us are here.”

BCTR takes the “bench to bedside” model of the medical sciences and applies it to the social sciences – training faculty and students in research-practice partnerships; carrying out applied, engaged research; and building research collaborations with policymakers and practitioners.

Papers from the conference will be published by the American Psychological Association.

(0) Comments.  |   Tags: Bronfenbrenner Conference    children    conference    inequality    media mention    Rachel Dunifon    Urie Bronfenbrenner   

Innovative RCCP conference puts attendees in charge

Tags: CARE,   conference,   Martha Holden,   RCCP,   youth,  

attendees at the CARE conference talk around a table

CARE Executives at the conference
photo: Heather Ainsworth

By Sheri Hall for the BCTR

The Residential Child Care Project (RCCP) hosted an event this fall to provide leaders from residential child care agencies a forum to share experiences and improve practices at their agencies.

A total of 36 leaders from 22 residential care agencies in three countries attended the conference, which took place from September 18 to 20 on Cornell’s campus. Each of the agencies who participated in the conference is in the process of implementing or using the Children and Residential Experiences: Creating Conditions for Change, or CARE, model – an evidence-based program developed by the RCCP to improve the social dynamics in residential care settings.

The conference used an innovative model called open space technology, or OST, which allowed the participants to create the conference agenda and goals. Over the course of three days, the participants worked in groups with a focus on the theme “Developmental Leadership.”

James Anglin and Martha Holden in conversation at the CARE conference

James Anglin and Martha Holden in conversation at the CARE conference
photo: Heather Ainsworth

“The goal of the two days was to explore issues of leadership’s role in implementing and embedding the CARE program in an organization,” said Martha Holden, director of the Residential Child Care Project and creator of CARE.

“Respecting the expertise, knowledge and passion that the participants brought to this event, the actual topics and content of the two days was decided by the participants. The discussions were led by the participants and the ideas and strategies generated came from the participants. They are the true experts about developmental leadership in a CARE organization.”

The handwritten conference schedule that attendees created on the spot
photo: Heather Ainsworth

This innovative format was facilitated by Dr. James Anglin, professor emeritus at the School of Child and Youth Care at the University of Victoria, BC. The event model allowed the participants to explore all dimensions of their leadership roles in implementing and sustaining CARE in their agencies.

“The Cornell team’s job was to provide a loose structure and hold the space and time so that the participants could focus on the discussion,” Holden said. “The rich discussions and the amazing energy and commitment of the group throughout the event was inspiring.”

Conference participants said the experienced helped them to learn how to improve the CARE model at their agencies. “The two days were an excellent experience for me,” said Fred Mohrien, chief program officer from Children’s Home of Wyoming Conference. “I very much appreciated the format of open space technology and I believe it brought forward the best in all of us.”


Related

Residential Child Care Project receives $2.8M grant
RCCP awarded $2.9 million to evaluate Syracuse schools intervention
Event celebrates program that helps youth in care

(0) Comments.  |   Tags: CARE    conference    Martha Holden    RCCP    youth   

Cornell Project 2Gen sponsors early education research


By Sheri Hall for the BCTR

Cornell Project 2Gen sponsored two researchers’ presentations at the Child Care and Early Education Policy Research Consortium meeting last month in Washington D.C.

Portrait of Lisa McCabe

Lisa McCabe

BCTR research associate Lisa McCabe, Cornell sociology professor John Sipple and Cornell alumnae Hope Casto, associate professor of education studies at Skidmore College, gave two presentations to early education scholars on research sponsored by Project 2Gen, which focuses on helping vulnerable families by developing programs that support parents and their children jointly.

The first explored factors related to child care deserts, neighborhoods and communities that are lacking access to child care for working families, particularly for children under 5 years old. The work is in its early stages, McCabe said.

“Project 2Gen has allowed us to expand our work to specifically look at Head Start, regulated child care centers, family child care homes and public pre-kindergarten,” she said. “We are particularly interested in how capacity may vary by rural or urban status and community wealth.”

Their second presentation focused on the challenges in working with administrative data, and various strategies for addressing them.

“As states across the country work to improve and expand their state-wide databases on early care and education, opportunities to use these data for researching policy-relevant trends are increasing,” McCabe said. “Yet working with these large, complex data sets can be difficult.

“By sharing lessons learned in the Project 2Gen work, we hope to facilitate better collaboration between state-level administrators and researchers to promote high-quality research that informs early education policy. “

Project 2Gen works to build a community of scholars focused on 2Gen approaches to support vulnerable families and partners with practitioners and policymakers throughout New York and the nation. Two-generational programs can begin by focusing on children and then add a component to support parents, such as parent education or skills classes. Others may focus on parents, and then add a component for children, such as child care or nutrition support. Still other approaches target systems that influence families, such as schools or workplaces.

(0) Comments.  |   Tags: children    conference    Cornell Project 2Gen    education    Lisa McCabe    presentation    research   

The science of successful aging


By Sheri Hall for the BCTR

What’s the secret to successful aging?  That’s the question two BCTR researchers took on at a panel discussion “The Science of Successful Aging” at the 2017 International Convention on Psychological Science, where thousands of researchers from more than 70 countries gathered to share research findings and techniques.

headshot of corinna loeckenhoff

Corinna Loeckenhoff

BCTR faculty affiliate Corinna Lockenhoff, associate professor of human development, chaired the panel. She began by discussing the idea of “successful aging,” which today often means thriving socially and intellectually in older adulthood.

“The concept may not generalize across cultures,” she said. “But one clear benefit of this new perspective on aging is that it encourages renewed focus on the processes that contribute to positive age-related outcomes.”

Lockenhoff said the panel sparked an interesting conversation because researchers approached the concept of successful aging from different vantage points.

“The presenters each highlighted a different approach to promote successful aging – from cardiovascular and strength training to cognitive and social engagement,” she said. “Ideally we should design interventions that integrate multiple aspects into one program.

“The audience in the symposium was composed of top researchers from around the world and it was fascinating to hear their ideas for realizing such programs within different cultural contexts,” she said.

Headshot of Karl Pillemer

Karl Pillemer

During the panel, BCTR director Karl Pillemer presented his work about aging adults' need to engage in meaningful activities.

Social isolation is a major problem later if life, Pillemer said. That’s because as older adults start to experience losses due to divorce, death, and geographical mobility, they also tend to transition out of full-time employment. This transition often results in older adults losing the sense of purpose that comes with full-time work.

Pillemer and BCTR colleagues have been evaluating an intervention program called Retirees in Service to the Environment, or RISE, to help aging adults regain their sense of purpose. RISE engages retirees in volunteer positions around environmental issues. RISE participants receive training about environmental topics and how to apply their skills in a volunteer capacity. Then, participants each build and implement an environmental stewardship project.

In studies of RISE, adults who participate reported an increased sense that they were contributing to the next generation and an improved sense of social integration.

“We really have no alternative other than to address these issues,” Pillemer said. “We can’t promote successful aging, based on what we know, without also engaging in the promotion of social integration.”

Other participants in the panel were Teresa Liu-Ambrose from Department of Physical Therapy at The University of British Columbia; Monica Fabiani in the Department of Psychology at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; and Denise C. Park from The Center for Vital Longevity at the University of Texas at Dallas.

At the same conference, Lockenhoff led a workshop called “Age Differences in Time Perception: Translating Findings from Lab to Life,” which provided an overview of age-related shifts in different aspects of time perception and offered examples of how such concepts can be studied along the translational continuum.

Related:

Connecting Retirees to Conservation

Climate Change and Vulnerable Populations

"Aging is not Dying" - podcast episode with Corinna Loeckenhoff

Loeckenhoff reaps early-career award in gerontology

(0) Comments.  |   Tags: aging    conference    Corinna Loeckenhoff    gerontology    Karl Pillemer    RISE   

PRYDE conference on social media literacy in youth


news-2017-prydeconf-inpost

front (l to r): David Dunning, Elaine Wethington, Kristen Elmore, Jutta Dotterweich, Jamila Simon, Esther Kim, Rachel Sumner. back: Chinwe Effiong, Paul Mihailidis, Kayla Burd, Josh Pasek, Jonathon Schuldt, Monica Bulger, Neil Lewis, Norbert Schwarz.

By Sheri Hall for the BCTR

What does the research tell us about how young people use social media? And what can educators do to teach youth how to use social media in productive, positive ways?

These were the questions researchers addressed at the second annual conference hosted by the Program for Research on Youth Development and Engagement (PRYDE). The conference, titled “Media Literacy and Citizenship Development in Youth and Emerging Young Adults,” was held from November 9 to 11 at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. It included multidisciplinary researchers and media developers from across the nation focused on youth, communications, misinformation, and media use.

Elaine Wethington, professor of human development and sociology and an associate director of the BCTR, organized the conference. She is a medical sociologist whose research focuses on stress, protective mechanisms of social support, aging, and translational research methods.

Sam Taylor presenting

Sam Taylor presenting

“There are few topics more urgent to address than the relationship of increased reliance on social media as a means of communication and the impact of the new media on social and political institutions,” Wethington said.  “Our long-term goal is to develop new ideas about how to translate research on promoting productive social media use among youth into effective programs that engage youth and emerging adults and their development as informed citizens.”

In addition to invited talks from leading media, communication, and social and developmental psychological researchers, the conference included discussions and group activities about how to teach youth to become positive stewards of social media and the information exchanged on the web. Moving forward, those ideas will help to inform projects in the Cornell Social Media Lab, a PRYDE collaborator.

(0) Comments.  |   Tags: conference    Elaine Wethington    PRYDE    social media    youth    youth development   

Videos on purpose and youth development


By Sheri Hall for the BCTR

Having a purpose in life is vitally important to youth’s health and wellness. That was the take-home message from the first annual conference hosted by the Program for Research on Youth Development and Engagement (PRYDE) in the BCTR.

The conference – held last fall in California – focused on purpose and health across the lifespan. It included researchers working in areas of education, psychology, biology, and public health from leading universities throughout the country. The conference was hosted by PRYDE co-director Anthony Burrow, an associate professor of human development whose research focuses on purpose as a psychological resource.

All of the full-length talks given by the researchers at the conference are available online, and each presenter also created short videos to explain their work to a wider audience. Motivating the conference was a desire to translate the latest research on purpose into an easily-understandable form for educators, social workers, and program directors.

“The amount of scientific evidence being produced showing the benefits of purpose is staggering,” Burrow said. “Yet, there is some distance between what researchers are finding and what the public knows about these findings. We believe this is unfortunate, and therefore designed a conference that invited leading purpose researchers share their insights, and then asking them to further unpack their findings for a wider audience.

“This is the kind of translation and information delivery PRYDE is well-positioned to do, and it is an exciting and enjoyable experience to be out front in making importance science more accessible to all,” he said.

Thanks to the conference’s success, PRYDE established it as an annual event, Burrow said. Its second conference on purpose – “Purpose in a Diverse Society” – will take place this October in St. Louis. This time, a new group of researchers will present their work on purpose and diversity in a variety of settings including university lecture halls, a museum, and a public library.

You can also find two playlists of the short videos – which include topics such as identity, work and family life, health and social and emotional learning - on the PRYDE YouTube channel.

PRYDE is a program created to promote positive youth development through empirical studies and by providing evidence-based best practices for 4-H and other youth organizations. Its goal is to generate new knowledge about youth development that will directly benefit 4-H participants in New York State and beyond.

(0) Comments.  |   Tags: Anthony Burrow    conference    PRYDE    purpose    video    youth development   

Joining parenting educators and researchers at annual in-service event


casasola

Marianella Casasola presenting

Parenting In Context (an initiative housed in the BCTR) holds annual in-service events at Cornell University for parent educators and others who work with parents and children across New York State. The in-service is a two-day event with networking opportunities, professional development workshops, and various academic presentations by Cornell faculty. By directly connecting those that work with parents with researchers studying parenting and child development, the initiatives delivers the latest research into the hands of those that can use it and allows researchers to hear from practitioners about research needs.

The 2016 event was held in September and featured presentations on topics such as:

  • family life in an era of mass incarceration
  • spatial language and play in early childhood
  • the gap between research and available interventions for autism spectrum disorders
  • the community impact of school-based health centers in rural New York
  • an update on the Toddler Talk pilot study
  • as well as workshops on how to conduct a Community Café and the role of social media in outreach efforts

Presenters included Christopher Wildeman and Sharon Tennyson from the Department of Policy, Analysis and Management, Michael Goldstein from the Department of Psychology, Marianella Casasola from the Department of Human Development, and Lee Humphreys from the Department of Communications, as well as Parenting In Context Staff Kimberly Kopko and Eliza Lathrop Cook. Participants included parent educators, as well as others who work with families and youth.  Participants came from 17 counties across New York State.

Participant comments:

I always take away so much away from these events. I find it very useful when the presenters know their audience and discuss how we can use this info in the field. The ability to connect with colleagues is valuable and energizing.

The connection between researchers and us (educators in the field) has been incredibly valuable!

The connection to new initiatives, programs, and research have been great opportunities for our county associations.

Parent Education In-Service full presentation/workshop list (in order of delivery)
Day 1

  • Family Life in an Era of Mass Incarceration - Christopher Wildeman
  • Early Childhood Development: Spatial Language and Play - Marianella Casasola
  • Workshop: The Power of Community Cafés - Anna Steinkraus & Elizabeth Wolff

Day 2

  • Toddler Talk Update: Facilitating Cognitive Development in Social Context, Pilot Study - Michael Goldstein, Eliza Lathrop Cook, & Amanda Root
  • Workshop: Role of Social Media in Outreach Efforts - Lee Humphreys
  • Enhancing the Community Impact of School-Based Health Centers in Rural New York via Parenting Education: A Pilot Study - Kim Kopko, Sharon Tennyson, & Maria Arrieta
  • Autism Spectrum Disorders: Discussion of Gap between Research and Available Interventions - Michael GoldsteinPartnering with Cornell Capstone Course: Experience and Benefits - Jackie Davis-Manigaulte
  • Training for Family Professionals on Positive Discipline - Nancy Olsen-Harbich
  • Parenting In Context Updates - Eliza Lathrop Cook & Kimberly Kopko

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(0) Comments.  |   Tags: conference    parenting    Parenting in Context   

Conference explores Building a Community of Practice

Tags: children,   conference,   RCCP,   residential care,   youth,  

news-2015rccpconf-inpostThe Residential Child Care Project (RCCP) hosted its fourth international RCCP Conference this summer in Lake George, NY. The conference brings together professionals who work with vulnerable children and families to explore ways to provide the best care for the populations they serve.

Approximately 250 people from 13 countries, including Australia, Canada, England, Scotland, N. Ireland, Bermuda, Ireland, Burundi, Israel, Switzerland, Uganda, and South Korea, as well as 18 different states, attended.

In keeping with this year’s theme, Building a Community of Practice, the event encouraged conversation and collaboration through a variety of workshops, community of practice forums, and social events. The unique format included:

  • Community of Practice forums where professionals met in facilitated groups to share experiences and learn from each other.
  • Children and Family Experiences sessions where attendees heard the voices of children, families, and adults who live or have lived in care settings.
  • Stories of Practice sessions where professionals could record their stories of experiences with children and families in order to share them with other professionals.  RCCP plans to release the stories of practice recordings in a series on their web site.
  • Therapeutic Crisis Intervention (TCI) program instructors and Children And Residential Experiences: Creating Conditions for Change (CARE) practice model consultants were available to answer questions about their program's implementation and training.
  • Workshops on understanding self-injury, research, proposal writing, trauma and healing, CARE principles and implementation, TCI implementation, threshold concepts, TCI training innovations using modern media, and many others.

The conference opened with a performance of original songs by The Hillside Youth Voice Band, made up of children in care from the Varick Campus, which is part of the Hillside Family of Agencies in Rochester, NY. Songs included,“I’m Gonna be Me,” “Can You See Who We Are,” and “You Make a Difference.”

Highlights included presentations by Anthony Burrow on Purpose in Life: Evidence of a Psychological Resource, Howard Bath on Translating Trauma: From Complexity to Clarity, Junelei Li on Simple and Deep Right Before Our Eyes – Simple Interactions as the Active Ingredient for Human Development, Xavier McElrath-Bey with No Child Is Born Bad, and John Lyons on Managing the Business of Personal Change: Transformation Collaborative Outcomes Management.

Keynote speaker Xavier McElrath-Bey has noted,

My childhood traumas of living in poverty, having a mother diagnosed with mental illness, living in fear of an abusive step-father, and being placed in and out of foster care made me ripe for the occasions of impulsive and destructive behavior -- especially gang involvement which gave me the sense of having a new family.

I am a firm believer that no child is born bad...and that all children deserve another chance for positive change.

The final event of the conference, was the panel presentation Children and Families Speak out on “What Works.” The panel was moderated by James Anglin and featured youth and young adults formerly in care and parents of children/youth who have been in care facilities. Panelists spoke of the pain and difficulties surrounding being in care, but also of facility staff that helped and encouraged both the youth in care and their families.

Please see the conference page for further information, including some presentation powerpoints.

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(0) Comments.  |   Tags: children    conference    RCCP    residential care    youth