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“Doing Translational Research,” the new BCTR podcast


doing translational researchBCTR projects actively do translational research (TR) in their work to address the most pressing human problems, but the center, and projects, also study and advance the processes which make for effective translation of research into practice. Our new podcast, Doing Translational Research, features conversations from researchers, practitioners, and others involved in the process of doing TR, exploring what they study and how they connect and work with others to strengthen research and practice.

Our first episodes are now available on Soundcloud, Stitcher, and iTunes (search on "Doing Translational Research"). In our first episode, BCTR director Karl Pillemer interviews Cornell professor of nutritional science Carol Devine. Professor Devine studies how food choices over the life course are shaped by life transitions, social roles, and the lived environment. In episode two, Karl talks with Charles Izzo, a research associate in the BCTR whose work focuses on factors that influence the quality of interactions between those in the helping professions (youth workers, home visitors) and the clients they serve.

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Doing Translational Research podcast: Carol Devine, Monday, October 15, 2018

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Doing Translational Research podcast: Carol Devine

Monday, February 22, 2016

Carol Devine
Division of Nutritional Science, Cornell University


Monday, February 22, 2016

Carol Devine
Division of Nutritional Science, Cornell University

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Talks at Twelve: Elaine Wethington and Carol Devine, Monday, February 22, 2016

 

Large and Small Life Events among Overweight and Obese Black and Latino Adults in a Behavior Change Trial
Elaine Wethington, Human Development, Sociology, and BCTR, and Carol Devine, Division of Nutritional Sciences

Monday, February 22, 2016
12:00-1:00PM
Beebe Hall, 2nd floor conference room



It is widely believed that stressor exposure can negatively affect health. However, the impact of stressors on health behaviors is not well understood. Professors Wethington and Devine developed an interval life events (ILE) measurement method, which assesses exposure to both major stressors (life events) and minor stressors (hassles), for use in clinical trials or observational studies. They evaluated this method in the Small Changes and Lasting Effects (SCALE) trial. SCALE is a community-based intervention promoting small changes in diet and physical activity among overweight and obese African-American and Hispanic adults to discover how stressors interfere with behavior change or trial participation. In their talk Wethington and Devine will report on their findings.

Professor Elaine Wethington (human development; sociology; Weill Cornell Medicine) studies stress and social support processes across the life course. She is co-principal investigator on SCALE, a weight loss intervention with low income Black and Latino adults in New York City, and co-director and MPI for the Translational Research Institute for Pain in Later Life (TRIPLL).

Professor Carol Devine, Division of Nutritional Sciences at Cornell, studies how food choices over the life course are shaped by life transitions, social roles, and the lived environment. She is co-investigator on SCALE.

This talk is open to all. Lunch will be served. Metered parking is available in the Plantations lot across the road from Beebe Hall. No registration or RSVP required except for groups of 5 or more. We ask that larger groups email Patty at pmt6@cornell.edu letting us know of your plans to attend so that we can order enough lunch.

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Talks at Twelve: Carol Devine and Pamela Weisberg-Shapiro, Tuesday, April 30, 2013

 

Food Choices among Dominican Women in New York City: Interaction of Food Culture and Environment
Carol Devine and Pamela Weisberg-Shapiro, Division of Nutritional Sciences, Cornell University

Tuesday, April 30, 2013
12:00-1:00PM
Beebe Hall, 2nd floor conference room



This talk is open to all. Lunch will be served. Metered parking is available in the Plantations lot across the road from Beebe Hall.

This is a BCTR Innovative Pilot Study Grant recipient talk.

Dominicans are a large and growing population in New York City with significant health and economic challenges. This qualitative study investigated how Dominican women defined and interacted with their food environments and how socio-cultural factors shaped their choices with implications for nutrition interventions in urban communities.

Project collaborators:
Carol Devine, PhD, RD Professor, Division of Nutritional Sciences
Pamela Weisberg-Shapiro, MPH, RD, Doctoral Candidate, Division of Nutritional Sciences
Sandra P Gucciardi, MPH, RD, Extension Associate, Cornell University Cooperative Extension of New York City

Carol Devine is Professor in the Division of Nutritional Sciences at Cornell University, where she studies continuity and change in nutrition practices over the life course and how these practices are affected by life transitions, social roles such as work and family life, and the lived environment. She has over 35 years of community nutrition research and outreach experience, focusing on the use of environmental strategies to promote healthy eating and physical activity in worksites, childcare, and other community settings. Professor Devine is a Co-Investigator on SCALE (Small Changes Lasting Effects), an NHLBI-funded weight loss intervention with low income Black and Latino adults in New York City. She is a member of the Cornell NutritionWorks team, offering on-line professional development for over 10,000 nutrition and health professionals around the world and is a co-author of an online course on ecological approaches to obesity prevention. She earned her doctorate in nutrition from Cornell University, her master’s degree from Tufts University, and her bachelor’s degree from the University of New Hampshire.

Pamela Weisberg-Shapiro is a doctoral candidate in Community Nutrition in the Division of Nutritional Sciences. She received her bachelor’s degree in Nutritional Sciences from Cornell University and Master’s in Public Health from the Rollins School of Public Health at Emory University. After completing her MPH, she moved to New York City to work in field of health education where her experience as a researcher at the Mount Sinai Hospital and Program Manager at HIP Health Plan fueled her interest in health disparities in urban areas. In an effort to better understand how health disparities can be ameliorated, she has focused her dissertation research on Dominican women living in Washington Heights and the South Bronx, which you will be hearing about today.

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