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Talks at Twelve: Marianella Casasola, Thursday, December 10, 2015

 

Spatial Language and Spatial Play in the Early Development of Spatial Skills
Marianella Casasola, Human Development

Thursday, December 10, 2015
12:00-1:00PM
Beebe Hall, 2nd floor conference room



This talk is open to all. Lunch will be served. Metered parking is available in the Plantations lot across the road from Beebe Hall. No registration or RSVP required except fo groups of 5 or more. We ask that larger groups email Patty at pmt6@cornell.edu letting us know of your plans to attend so that we can order enough lunch.

Spatial skills contribute to a number of important abilities—navigation, building from instructions, or imagining an object’s appearance from a different angle. In a one-month study, Dr. Casasola found that providing spatial language as preschool children engaged in constructive play (e.g., building with blocks) yielded greater gains in their spatial skills than constructive play alone. In a Head Start training study, she found that constructive play provided a better context for acquiring spatial language than other play activities (e.g., arts and crafts, book reading). These findings point to a synergistic relation between spatial language and constructive play in the development of young children’s spatial skills and suggest an accessible, cost-effective approach to promoting spatial skills and spatial language in preschool children.

Marianella Casasola is an associate professor of human development in the College of Human Ecology. She received her Ph.D. (2000) and M.A. (1995) from the University of Texas at Austin, and her B.A. (1992) from the University of California at Berkeley. She has been associate editor of Developmental Psychology since 2012 and a board member of the Cognitive Development Society since 2013. Casasola’s talk reports on work done as a BCTR Pilot Study Grant recipient. She is also a current BCTR Fellow, one of three in the program’s inaugural year.

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Talks at Twelve: Nathan Spreng, Thursday, October 8, 2015

 

Determinants of Financial Vulnerability in Community-Dwelling Older Adults: A Pilot Research Study
Nathan Spreng, Human Development

Thursday, October 8, 2015
12:00-1:00PM
Beebe Hall, 2nd floor conference room



This talk is open to all. Lunch will be served. Metered parking is available in the Plantations lot across the road from Beebe Hall. No registration or RSVP required except fo groups of 5 or more. We ask that larger groups email Patty at pmt6@cornell.edu letting us know of your plans to attend so that we can order enough lunch.

Financial exploitation of the aged is an emerging public health problem that requires surveillance, education and intervention. The goal of this BCTR pilot project is to begin to determine the social, cognitive, and neurobiological risk factors for financial exploitation in older adults and develop an assessment tool. This will serve a long-term goal of identifying individuals who are vulnerable to financial exploitation, thereby facilitating prevention or intervention efforts. In his talk Nathan Spreng will cover the beginning stages and insights emerging from pilot work on the project.

Dr. Nathan Spreng is an assistant professor and the director of the Laboratory of Brain and Cognition in the Department of Human Development at Cornell University. His research into neurocognitive aging examines large-scale brain network dynamics and their role in cognition. Currently Dr. Spreng is investigating the link between memory, cognitive control, and social cognition and the interacting brain networks that support them. In doing so he hopes to better understand cognitive and neuroscience processes as they change across the lifespan, including the factors that render older adults vulnerable to financial exploitation.

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Talks at Twelve: Barbara Ganzel, Thursday, September 10, 2015

 

Trauma-informed Hospice and Palliative Care: Unique Vulnerabilities Call for Unique Strategies
Barbara Ganzel, Visiting Fellow, BCTR

Thursday, September 10, 2015
12:00-1:00PM
Beebe Hall, 2nd floor conference room



Hospice and palliative care populations may be uniquely vulnerable to trauma and stress-related disorders. Trauma reactivation due to normal aging may combine synergistically with medical trauma at the end of life, particularly in the presence of chronic pain, anxiety, delirium, or dementia. This in turn will negatively impact patient mental health, well-being, and reported pain, with important consequences for patient care. Assessment of prior trauma is recommended in hospice and palliative care, along with the development of trauma treatment strategies appropriate to these populations.

In her talk Dr. Ganzel will share some of her findings and observations learned from her work at Hospicare of Ithaca.

After receiving her Ph.D. in Human Development at Cornell, Barbara Ganzel did postdoctoral work in integrative neuroscience at the Sackler Institute at Weill Cornell Medical College in NYC. Her pre- and post-doctoral research was supported by National Research Service Awards from NIMH to study trauma-related sensitization of the stress response in nonclinical populations. She continued this work as director of the Lifespan Affective Neuroscience lab at Cornell. In 2013, she entered a clinical respecialization program to focus on stress/trauma at end-of-life. Dr. Ganzel currently works with a national collaboration of clinicians to develop palliative treatments for trauma, anxiety, and pain in hospice patients.

This talk is open to all. Lunch will be served. Metered parking is available in the Plantations lot across the road from Beebe Hall. No registration or RSVP required except fo groups of 5 or more. We ask that larger groups email Patty at pmt6@cornell.edu letting us know of your plans to attend so that we can order enough lunch.

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Garbarino’s “Listening to Killers” Talk at Twelve video online


news-garbarino-inpostFor twenty years James Garbarino has served as a psychological expert witness in criminal and civil cases involving issues of trauma, violence, and children. A former student of Urie Bronfenbrenner's, his approach is to consider the ways developmental processes are shaped by the human ecology in which they occur. On February 9 Garbarino delivered a BCTR Talk at Twelve based on his recent book, Listening to Killers: Lessons Learned from My Twenty Years as a Psychological Expert Witness in Murder Cases. In his talk he recounted specific stories from killers' lives and crimes, serving to demonstrate the ways that untreated early emotional and moral damage can create violent adults. Video from the talk, Listening to Killers: Bringing Developmental Psychology into the Courtroom in Murder Cases, is now available to view online on our YouTube channel, and is embedded below.

In a Cornell Chronicle story about this work and the talk, Garbarino noted,

Most killers should be understood as traumatized children who inhabit and control the minds, hearts and bodies of adult men.

James Garbarino is a Cornell professor emeritus of human development and the Maude C. Clarke Chair in Humanistic Psychology at Loyola University in Chicago.

Garbarino book goes inside the minds of murderers - Cornell Chronicle

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Talks at Twelve: James Garbarino, Saturday, September 21, 2019

portrait of james garbarino View Media

Talks at Twelve: James Garbarino

Listening to Killers: Bringing Developmental Psychology into the Courtroom in Murder Cases
Thursday, February 9, 2015

James Garbarino
Psychology, Loyola University Chicago


Listening to Killers: Bringing Developmental Psychology into the Courtroom in Murder Cases
Thursday, February 9, 2015

James Garbarino
Psychology, Loyola University Chicago

(0) Comments.  |   Tags: BCTR Talks at Twelve    criminal justice    James Garbarino    psychology    video   

Talks at Twelve: Christopher Wildeman, Saturday, September 21, 2019

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Talks at Twelve: Christopher Wildeman

Children of the Prison Boom: Mass Incarceration and the Future of American Inequality
Tuesday, January 27, 2014

Christopher Wildeman
Policy Analysis & Management, Cornell University


Children of the Prison Boom: Mass Incarceration and the Future of American Inequality
Tuesday, January 27, 2014

Christopher Wildeman
Policy Analysis & Management, Cornell University

(0) Comments.  |   Tags: BCTR Talks at Twelve    children    incarceration    inequality    video   

Spring 2015 Talks at Twelve announced


The center is pleased to announce the spring speakers in our Talks at Twelve series. Unless otherwise noted, Talks at Twelve are held in the Beebe Hall second floor conference room and lunch is served. These talks are free and open to all. No RSVP or registration is required, but notice is appreciated if a larger group is planning to attend.

wildeman-mailchimpTuesday, January 27, 12:00-1:00pm
Children of the Prison Boom: Mass Incarceration and the Future of American Inequality
Christopher Wildeman, Policy Analysis & Management, Cornell University

0089_12_082.jpgThursday, February 12, 12:00-1:00pm
Translational Research Goes to School: Action Research at High Tech High
Stephen Hamilton, Human Development, Cornell University
Mara Jacobs, Human Development, Cornell University

garbarino-mailchimpThursday, February 19, 12:00-1:00pm - In The Nevin Welcome Center, Plantations
Listening to Killers: Bringing Developmental Psychology into the Courtroom in Murder Cases
James Garbarino, Psychology Department, Loyola University Chicago

karns-mailchimpThursday, March 12, 12:00-1:00pm
Fostering an Intellectual Environment for Students through Research: Integrating Science, Law, and Societal Needs
M. Elizabeth Karns, Social Statistics, Cornell University

0089_12_140.jpgThursday, March 19, 12:00-1:00pm
Helping Parents Help Their Teens: Lessons Learned about Parent Stress and Support from Research on Self-injury and Families
Janis Whitlock, BCTR, Cornell University

tach-mailchimpThursday, April 9, 12:00-1:00pm
A Pilot Study of Parent-child Relationship Dynamics within Blended Families
Laura Tach, Policy Analysis & Management, Cornell University

goodyear-mailchimpThursday, April 23, 12:00-1:00pm
Qualitative Inquiry in Evaluation: From Theory to Practice
Leslie Goodyear, Education Development Center

seguin-mailchimpThursday, May 14, 1:00-2:00pm
Translating the Evidence to Build a Community-level Intervention Framework for Catalyzing Positive Change in Rural Food and Physical Activity Environments
Rebecca Seguin, Nutritional Sciences, Cornell University

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Talks at Twelve: Rebecca Seguin, Thursday, May 14, 2015

 

Using Tablet-Based Technology with Residents to Understand Barriers and Facilitators to Healthy Eating and Active Living: Rural Findings and Potential Catalysts for Change
Rebecca Seguin, Division of Nutritional Sciences, Cornell University

Thursday, May 14, 2015
12:00PM-1:00PM
Beebe Hall, 2nd floor conference room



This talk is open to all. Lunch will be served. Metered parking is available in the Plantations lot across the road from Beebe Hall.

A community’s built environment can influence key health behaviors. Rural populations experience significant health disparities, yet built environment studies in these settings are limited. In her talk, Rebecca Seguin will explore the use of an innovative, participatory, tablet-based community assessment tool, the Discovery Tool App, to conduct built environment audits in rural settings. Twenty-four community residents in four rural Upstate New York towns were given the opportunity to utilize this tool and provide their feedback through focus group sessions. Dr. Seguin will describe resident perspectives on community built environment features as identified through the use of the Discovery Tool as well as opportunities for community improvement and change.

Dr. Rebecca Seguin is assistant professor in the Division of Nutritional Sciences and recipient of a BCTR Pilot Study grant on which her talk is based. Her current research focuses on understanding how people’s social, food, and physical activity environments influence behavior over time—particularly in rural communities. She is also working on community mobilization and capacity building initiatives with health educators who serve rural areas. The goal is to provide training and evaluation tools to help them engage residents to become involved in programs and policies to improve their food and physical activity environments through collective action.

(0) Comments.  |   Tags: BCTR Talks at Twelve    health   

Talks at Twelve: Leslie Goodyear, Thursday, April 23, 2015

 

Qualitative Inquiry in Evaluation: From Theory to Practice
Leslie Goodyear, Education Development Center

Thursday, April 23, 2015
12:00-1:00PM
Beebe Hall, 2nd floor conference room



This talk is open to all. Lunch will be served. Metered parking is available in the Plantations lot across the road from Beebe Hall.

How can evaluators integrate qualitative inquiry into their evaluation practice? Where does qualitative inquiry fit into well-known evaluation approaches such as Utilization-Focused Evaluation or Participatory Evaluation, or for that matter, Theory-Driven Evaluation? What do practicing evaluators learn about these intersections when they practice qualitative evaluation? And, what constitutes high-quality qualitative evaluation? Leslie Goodyear will focus on these theoretical and practical issues and share a framework for thinking about quality in qualitative evaluation when she presents an overview of her new book, Qualitative Inquiry in Evaluation: From Theory to Practice.

Leslie Goodyear brings nearly 20 years of experience evaluating educational initiatives domestically and internationally, in both formal and informal educational settings. At the Education Development Center (EDC), Leslie leads multiple evaluation studies and coordinates evaluation capacity building activities across the Learning and Teaching Division. From 2009 to 2012, she took a leave from EDC to serve as a program officer at the National Science Foundation. In addition to her day job, Leslie is the associate editor of the American Journal of Evaluation, lead editor of Qualitative Inquiry in Evaluation: From Theory to Practice (2014), and serves on a number of committees for AEA. Leslie received a Master of Science and her Ph.D. from the College of Human Ecology, Cornell University.

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Talks at Twelve: Laura Tach, Thursday, April 9, 2015

 

Adolescent Well-Being in an Era of Family Instability and Complexity: Demographic Trends and Family Processes
Laura Tach, Policy Analysis & Management, Cornell University

Thursday, April 9, 2015
12:00-1:00PM
Beebe Hall, 2nd floor conference room



This talk is open to all. Lunch will be served. Metered parking is available in the Plantations lot across the road from Beebe Hall.

The American family has undergone profound transformations since the mid-twentieth century, fueled by dramatic growth in cohabitation, divorce, and non-marital childbearing. Today, less than half of children will grow up solely in a traditional nuclear family. What are the consequences of growing up in unstable and complex families? In her talk Dr. Tach will describe trends and disparities in children’s exposure to family instability and complexity and document the consequences for adolescent educational and socio-emotional outcomes. She will conclude with a discussion of novel data collection strategies for monitoring family processes in complex households.

Dr. Laura Tach is an assistant professor in the Department of Policy Analysis and Management. She is a sociologist who studies urban poverty and family life. Her mixed-methods research examines how neighborhoods and families reproduce inequality and how public policy affects these processes. Her recent work examines how family structure shapes social mobility and how families utilize public and private safety nets to mitigate material hardship. Laura received her Ph.D. in Sociology and Social Policy at Harvard University. Prior to coming to Cornell, Laura was a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Postdoctoral Scholar at the University of Pennsylvania.

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