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Talks at Twelve: Brian Leidy and Marney Thomas, Thursday, November 10, 2016

 
leidy thomas

Family Violence Prevention and Intervention in the Military: U.S. Army Family Advocacy Command Support Study: Lessons Learned
Brian Leidy and Marney Thomas, BCTR

Thursday, November 10, 2016
12:00-1:00 PM
Beebe Hall, 2nd floor conference room



Over a 15 year period (2001–2016) the Military Projects staff have been studying the impact of command leadership on recidivism in family violence (child and partner maltreatment) in the U.S. Army’s Family Advocacy Program (FAP). The three sequential studies that were conducted,  using installation records and Army Central Register data, provided a unique opportunity to understand and analyze  how intervention is implemented in the Army and examine what contextual, organizational, family, and individual characteristics mediate recidivism in cases of both partner maltreatment and child maltreatment. Leidy and Thomas will share lessons learned in their joint presentation.

Brian D. Leidy, Ph.D., is a senior extension associate in the BCTR.  He is the director of the Military Projects, assisting military family support programs in the Army, Army Reserve, and Department of Defense with needs assessment, program evaluation, and research studies of programs and services offered to service members and their families.

Marney Thomas, Ph.D., is a senior extension associate and the former director of the Military Projects (1991-2009).

This talk is open to all. Lunch will be served. Metered parking is available in the Botanical Gardens lot across the road from Beebe Hall. No registration or RSVP required except fo groups of 5 or more. We ask that larger groups email Patty at pmt6@cornell.edu letting us know of your plans to attend so that we can order enough lunch.

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Talks at Twelve: Matthew Kaplan, Wednesday, October 5, 2016

Tags: aging,   BCTR Talks at Twelve,  
 

Intergenerational Spaces and Places
Matthew Kaplan, Intergenerational Programs & Aging, Department of Agricultural Economics, Sociology, & Education, Penn State University

Wednesday, October 5, 2016
12:00 - 1:00 PM
Beebe Hall, 2nd floor conference room



What does it mean to create public places that are conducive to intergenerational engagement and coop¬eration? Places such as parks, playgrounds, shopping malls, community centers, and purpose-built age-integrated centers where the generations can readily meet, interact, build relationships, and, if desired, work together to address issues of common concern. In his talk, Kaplan will present examples of creative programs, planned environments (including images and objects found in these environments), and design strategies that are responsive to intergenerational engagement goals in diverse settings. Kaplan will frame these examples in the context of intergenerational contact zones -- a conceptual tool (for examining complex, multi-generational settings), and a design tool (for generating innovative ideas for developing intergenerational meeting spaces which may be converted into socially meaningful places).

Matthew Kaplan is Professor of Intergenerational Programs and Aging in the Department of Agricultural Economics, Sociology, and Education at Penn State, where he conducts research, develops curricular resources, and provides leadership in the development and evaluation of intergenerational programs. At the core of Kaplan’s  research and outreach initiatives is the Penn State Intergenerational Program, rooted in Penn State Extension, but inclusive of a broader base of scholars and practitioners working in diverse settings. He has a Ph.D. in Environmental Psychology from CUNY Graduate Center and is an affiliate faculty member of Penn State’s Center for Healthy Aging.

This talk is open to all. Lunch will be served. Metered parking is available in the Botanical Gardens lot across the road from Beebe Hall. No registration or RSVP required except fo groups of 5 or more. We ask that larger groups email Patty at pmt6@cornell.edu letting us know of your plans to attend so that we can order enough lunch.

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Talks at Twelve: Peter Fallesen, Sunday, September 15, 2019

Peter Fallesen View Media

Talks at Twelve: Peter Fallesen

Noncustodial Alternatives to Imprisonment and Offenders' Union Formations and Dissolutions in Denmark
Wednesday, March 2, 2016

Peter Fallesen
Swedish Institute for Social Research, Stockholm University


Noncustodial Alternatives to Imprisonment and Offenders' Union Formations and Dissolutions in Denmark
Wednesday, March 2, 2016

Peter Fallesen
Swedish Institute for Social Research, Stockholm University

(0) Comments.  |   Tags: BCTR Talks at Twelve    incarceration    international    marriage    video   

Talks at Twelve: Peter Fallesen, Wednesday, March 2, 2016

 
fallesen

Noncustodial Alternatives to Imprisonment and Offenders' Union Formations and Dissolutions in Denmark
Peter Fallesen, Stockholm University

Wednesday, March 2, 2016
12:00 - 1:00 PM
Beebe Hall, 2nd floor conference room



Romantic relationships lower offenders’ risk of recidivism. Yet, at the same time, previously incarcerated people do worse on the marriage market, and are more likely to remain single or experience a divorce. By analyzing a recent Danish policy that introduced a noncustodial alternative to imprisonment—electronic monitoring and home confinement— we show that electronic monitoring significantly and persistently lowered the risk both of being single and of becoming single during the first four years following an offender’s criminal conviction. The results highlight that a tool used to promote decarceration trends also secures better relationship outcomes of convicted men.

Peter Fallesen received his PhD in Sociology from University of Copenhagen in 2015. He is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Swedish Institute for Social Research at Stockholm University and a Senior Researcher at the Rockwool Foundation Research Unit in Copenhagen. He works primarily in the fields of family demography and social stratification. His present research interests revolve around how temporal and intergenerational connections between child welfare services, mental health services, and the criminal justice system create and maintain social inequalities. Recent work has appeared in Journal of Health and Social Behavior and Child Abuse & Neglect.

This talk is open to all. Lunch will be served. Metered parking is available in the Plantations lot across the road from Beebe Hall. No registration or RSVP required except for groups of 5 or more. We ask that larger groups email Patty at pmt6@cornell.edu letting us know of your plans to attend so that we can order enough lunch.

(0) Comments.  |   Tags: BCTR Talks at Twelve    criminal justice    incarceration    international    marriage   

Talks at Twelve: Andrew Turner, Thursday, May 12, 2016

Tags: 4-H,   Andrew Turner,   BCTR Talks at Twelve,   CCE,  
 

Exploring the Building Blocks of Disruptive Innovation in Cornell Cooperative Extension
Andrew Turner, New York 4-H Youth Development

Thursday, May 12, 2016
12:00-1:00 PM
Beebe Hall, 2nd floor conference room



Cooperative Extension faces significant challenges as it attempts to adapt core business principles to a rapidly-changing 21st century landscape. Disruptive Innovation is a powerful organizational change theory that emerged in the private sector but is now being increasingly applied to social-sector organizations. In his talk Andy will present the results of his recently completed dissertation study which explored programmatic innovation in Cornell Cooperative Extension through the lens of Disruptive Innovation. The purpose of the study was to determine if there are common building blocks supporting and sustaining disruptive type innovation in Extension. The results of the study, and the potential implications for Cooperative Extension, will be explored and discussed.

Andy Turner leads the New York State 4-H Youth Development program in the BCTR for Cornell Cooperative Extension. He joined the campus-based Extension leadership in 2012 after serving 23 years as a county educator and executive director. Advancing environmental education and sustainability, and applying a facilitative leadership style towards organizational change and innovation are two consistent themes throughout his career. Andy earned his bachelor's and master's from Cornell University and has just recently completed his Ed.D in executive leadership from St. John Fisher College. Andy is a third-generation Cooperative Extension professional with numerous family connections to Cornell and Ithaca.

This talk is open to all. Lunch will be served. Metered parking is available in the Plantations lot across the road from Beebe Hall. No registration or RSVP required except for groups of 5 or more. We ask that larger groups email Patty at pmt6@cornell.edu letting us know of your plans to attend so that we can order enough lunch.

(0) Comments.  |   Tags: 4-H    Andrew Turner    BCTR Talks at Twelve    CCE   

Talks at Twelve: Charles Izzo and Elliott Smith, Thursday, March 10, 2016

 

Creating Conditions for Healthy Development in Residential Youth Care Settings: Recent Findings from the CARE Program
Charles Izzo and Elliott Smith, BCTR

Thursday, March 10, 2016
12:00-1:00 PM
Beebe Hall, 2nd floor conference room



In their talk, Drs. Izzo and Smith will describe results from a multi-site evaluation of Children and Residential Experiences (CARE), a program that helps residential care agencies follow a set of evidence-informed principles in order to improve their child care practice. They will summarize the program design and the results from an 11-site study, which used an Interrupted Time Series (ITS) design to demonstrate a decline in behavioral incidents resulting from CARE’s 3-year implementation. They will also discuss the ITS as a powerful evaluation option for human service agencies that wish to make good use of their administrative data.

Charles Izzo is a research associate in the BCTR studying the multi-level processes by which programmed interventions influence human functioning and health. Currently, his work focuses on factors that influence the quality of interactions between those in the helping professions (youth workers, home visitors) and the clients they serve, and translating research knowledge into useful tools for practitioners and administrators.

Elliott Smith is associate director of the National Data Archive on Child Abuse and Neglect and a developmental psychologist with a passion for quantitative data who applies statistical methods to data from many sources, including administrative databases and surveys. His goal is to understand factors that impact youth-caregiver relationships and to make science-based contributions to the practice wisdom of human service professionals, educators, and parents.

This talk is open to all. Lunch will be served. Metered parking is available in the Plantations lot across the road from Beebe Hall. No registration or RSVP required except for groups of 5 or more. We ask that larger groups email Patty at pmt6@cornell.edu letting us know of your plans to attend so that we can order enough lunch.

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Talks at Twelve: Elaine Wethington and Carol Devine, Monday, February 22, 2016

 

Large and Small Life Events among Overweight and Obese Black and Latino Adults in a Behavior Change Trial
Elaine Wethington, Human Development, Sociology, and BCTR, and Carol Devine, Division of Nutritional Sciences

Monday, February 22, 2016
12:00-1:00PM
Beebe Hall, 2nd floor conference room



It is widely believed that stressor exposure can negatively affect health. However, the impact of stressors on health behaviors is not well understood. Professors Wethington and Devine developed an interval life events (ILE) measurement method, which assesses exposure to both major stressors (life events) and minor stressors (hassles), for use in clinical trials or observational studies. They evaluated this method in the Small Changes and Lasting Effects (SCALE) trial. SCALE is a community-based intervention promoting small changes in diet and physical activity among overweight and obese African-American and Hispanic adults to discover how stressors interfere with behavior change or trial participation. In their talk Wethington and Devine will report on their findings.

Professor Elaine Wethington (human development; sociology; Weill Cornell Medicine) studies stress and social support processes across the life course. She is co-principal investigator on SCALE, a weight loss intervention with low income Black and Latino adults in New York City, and co-director and MPI for the Translational Research Institute for Pain in Later Life (TRIPLL).

Professor Carol Devine, Division of Nutritional Sciences at Cornell, studies how food choices over the life course are shaped by life transitions, social roles, and the lived environment. She is co-investigator on SCALE.

This talk is open to all. Lunch will be served. Metered parking is available in the Plantations lot across the road from Beebe Hall. No registration or RSVP required except for groups of 5 or more. We ask that larger groups email Patty at pmt6@cornell.edu letting us know of your plans to attend so that we can order enough lunch.

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View videos from fall BCTR talks


Videos from our fall events are now online, in case you missed them or want to revisit the events. Videos are embedded below (when possible) and all are permanently archived in our media library.

2015 Iscol Lecture:
Workforce of the Future

October 7, 2015
Reshma Saujani, Founder and CEO, Girls Who Code

2015 Bronfenbrenner Lecture:
The Obama Evidence-Based Revolution: Will It Last?

September 16, 2015
Ron Haskins, Center on Children and Families; Budgeting for National Priorities; Economic Studies, Brookings Institution

View video

Talk at Twelve:
Helping Parents Help Their Teens: Lessons Learned about Parent Stress and Support from Research on Self-injury and Families

November 12, 2015
Janis Whitlock, BCTR, Cornell University

Talk at Twelve:
Trauma-informed Hospice and Palliative Care: Unique Vulnerabilities Call for Unique Strategies

September 10, 2015
Barbara Ganzel, BCTR, Cornell University

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Talks at Twelve: Janis Whitlock, Sunday, September 15, 2019

whitlock View Media

Talks at Twelve: Janis Whitlock

Helping Parents Help Their Teens: Lessons Learned about Parent Stress and Support from Research on Self-injury and Families
Thursday, November 12, 2015

Janis Whitlock
BCTR, Cornell University


Helping Parents Help Their Teens: Lessons Learned about Parent Stress and Support from Research on Self-injury and Families
Thursday, November 12, 2015

Janis Whitlock
BCTR, Cornell University

(0) Comments.  |   Tags: BCTR Talks at Twelve    CRPSIR    Janis Whitlock    mental health    self-injury    video    youth   

Fall 2015 Talks at Twelve


The center is pleased to announce the fall speakers in our Talks at Twelve series. Talks at Twelve are held in the Beebe Hall second floor conference room and lunch is served. These talks are free and open to all. No RSVP or registration is required, but notice is appreciated if a larger group is planning to attend (email pmt6@cornell.edu).

ganzel-mailchimpThursday, September 10, 12:00-1:00pm
Trauma-informed Hospice and Palliative Care: Unique Vulnerabilities Call for Unique Strategies
Barbara Ganzel, BCTR, Cornell University

spreng-mailchimpThursday, October 8, 12:00-1:00pm
Determinants of Financial Vulnerability in Community-Dwelling Older Adults: A Pilot Research Study
Nathan Spreng, Human Development, Cornell University

0089_12_140.jpgThursday, November 12, 12:00-1:00pm
Helping Parents Help Their Teens: Lessons Learned about Parent Stress and Support from Research on Self-injury and Families
Janis Whitlock, BCTR, Cornell University

Marianella Casasola, Professor in Human Development, portrait picture.Thursday, December 10, 12:00-1:00pm
Spatial Language and Spatial Play in the Early Development of Spatial Skills
Marianella Casasola, Human Development, Cornell University

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