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Talks at Twelve: Monika M. Safford, Thursday, November 30, 2017

 
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Health Equity in the 21st Century: Challenges and Solutions
Monika M. Safford

Thursday, November 30, 2017
12:00-1:00 PM
Beebe Hall, 2nd floor conference room



Throughout her distinguished career as a clinician-investigator with clinical expertise in preventive healthcare, treatment of acute and chronic illness, and the coordination of care for those with complex diseases, Dr. Monika Safford is recognized as an expert in patient-centered research on diabetes, cardiovascular epidemiology and prevention, and health disparities. Over the course of conducting four trials in an underserved and largely African American region, the Alabama Black Belt, she has developed the concept of 'community partnered' research that shows promise as a strategy to eliminate inequities in health outcomes. In her talk, Dr. Safford will share how she developed this concept and how it will be operationalized as part of Cornell's new Center for Health Equity.

Dr. Monika Safford is the John J. Kulper Professor of Medicine in the Department of Medicine and the chief of the Division of General Internal Medicine at Weill Cornell Medical College. She is a clinician-investigator with clinical expertise in preventive healthcare, treatment of acute and chronic illness and the coordination of care for those with complex diseases. Dr. Safford previously served at University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) School of Medicine as the Inaugural Endowed Professor of Diabetes Prevention and Outcomes Research, Assistant Dean for Continuing Medical Education, Associate Director of the Center for Outcomes and Effectiveness Research and Education, and Co-Director of UAB's T32 Health Services and Comparative Effectiveness Research Training Program. She is an active principal investigator with ongoing support from the National Institutes of Health, Patient Centered Outcomes Research Institute, and industrial sources. Throughout her career as an educator, she has trained and mentored numerous medical students, graduate students, residents, fellows, and junior faculty members. She has chaired national meetings for the Society of General Internal Medicine and the American Diabetes Association for which she serves on a steering committee for an ISTEP medical education initiative and was Co-Chair of the ISTEP Writing Committee. Dr. Safford's honors include the American Association of Medical Colleges Learning Health System Research Pioneer Award (2013-14), a Gold Honor Society Humanism Program faculty mentor appointment (2012) and multiple awards for Research Excellence from UAB Department of Medicine, including the UAB Department of Medicine Max Cooper Award for Excellence in Research.

With more than 260 papers published in top tier journals, she is an expert in patient-centered research on diabetes, cardiovascular epidemiology and prevention, and health disparities. Among her published studies are noteworthy investigations on an underserved and largely African-American region called the Alabama Black Belt, where two-thirds of adults are obese and many have diabetes, hypertension or other chronic conditions. Dr. Safford has studied how health coaches and other non-traditional interventions affect patient outcomes, and was recently awarded a $10 million grant by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute of the National Institutes of Health to test two ways of improving the blood pressure of 2,000 people in the area.

Dr. Safford received her Bachelor of Arts degree from Dartmouth College and her Medical Degree from Weill Cornell. She completed her residency in internal medicine at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. Before joining the University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Medicine and the Birmingham Veterans Administration Medical Center in 2003, she earlier worked as an instructor of medicine at Brown University Medical School with a hospital appointment at The Miriam Hospital in Providence, Rhode Island; and the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, with a hospital appointment at the affiliated University Hospital.

Lunch will be served. Metered parking is available in the Botanic Gardens lot across the road from Beebe Hall. No registration or RSVP required except for groups of 5 or more. We ask that larger groups email Patty at pmt6@cornell.edu letting us know of your plans to attend so that we can order enough lunch.

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Talks at Twelve: Peter Lloyd-Sherlock, Wednesday, October 11, 2017

 

Researching Unregulated Residential Care Homes in Argentina
Peter Lloyd-Sherlock, University of East Anglia

Wednesday, October 11, 2017
12:00-1:00 PM
Beebe Hall, 2nd floor conference room



Residential long-term care is becoming increasingly widespread in low and middle-income countries. In 2010 it was estimated that Argentina contained 6,000 care homes for older people. Media reports often reveal poor quality care, in some cases amounting to abuses of residents’ human rights. Many care homes are unregulated, presenting a barrier to obtaining robust and systematic data on service quality. As part of a wider collaboration, Peter led a study to develop an innovative design for auditing residential care quality and applied it to a single Argentine city. His talk will focus on this innovative study design, with particular attention to related ethical challenges. He will present study findings and discuss wider implications for research on long-term care in similar settings.

Peter Lloyd-Sherlock is Professor of Social Policy and International Development at the University of East Anglia, UK. He is currently a visiting scholar at the Bronfenbrenner Center for Translational Research. Peter's research mainly relates to the health and wellbeing of older people in low- and middle-income countries, including secondments and advisory roles for a number of international agencies (most recently, World Health Organization, UN Women, and HelpAge International).

Lunch will be served. Metered parking is available in the Botanic Gardens lot across the road from Beebe Hall. No registration or RSVP required except for groups of 5 or more. We ask that larger groups email Patty at pmt6@cornell.edu letting us know of your plans to attend so that we can order enough lunch.

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Talks at Twelve: T.V. Sekher, Thursday, May 25, 2017

 
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Designing and Implementing the Longitudinal Ageing Study in India (LASI)
T.V. Sekher, International Institute for Population Sciences

Thursday, May 25, 2017
12:00-1:00 PM
Beebe Hall, 2nd floor conference room



Data are lacking on the health, social support, and economic security of India’s growing elderly population, and concern is mounting about the well-being of this expanding group. By assembling a research team of demographers, economists, medical doctors, sociologists, and public health and policy experts, the Longitudinal Aging Study in India (LASI) aims to supply the data needed to understand the situation of India’s elderly population. LASI covers a nationally representative sample of 60,000 households to be followed longitudinally. In his talk, Professor Sekher will share how this data will provide a much-needed foundation for scientific research and policy making related to aging in India. LASI is a collaborative venture of the International Institute for Population Sciences, Mumbai, the Harvard School of Public Health, and the University of Southern California.

Dr. T.V. Sekher is a Professor in the Department of Population Policies and Programs at the International Institute for Population Sciences (IIPS), Mumbai. He is the Co-Principal Investigator of the Longitudinal Aging Study in India (LASI) and is also core team member of "Study on Global Ageing and Adult Health (SAGE-India)". He is  currently the Fulbright-Nehru Senior Fellow with SAP, Mario Einaudi Center for International Studies at Cornell University. Trained in Demography and Sociology, his areas of research interests are social demography, gender issues, population ageing, and public health.

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Talks at Twelve: Andrea Stevenson Won, Thursday, March 16, 2017

 
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Pain and Presence: The Clinical Use of Media
Andrea Stevenson Won, Departement of Communication, Cornell University

Thursday, March 16, 2017
12:00-1:00 PM
Beebe Hall, 2nd floor conference room



Using media to address pain can be a low-cost and low-risk intervention. Media used for this purpose range from simple text-based chats to immersive virtual reality experiences. In her talk Andrea Stevenson Won will review ways in which media can be used to address acute and chronic pain. Interventions include transporting patients from their painful surroundings, and changing how patients move and perceive their movements represented through media.  She will also describe an ongoing research project designed to test the effects of presence on pain in virtual environments.

Andrea Stevenson Won is an assistant professor in the Department of Communication at Cornell University, and the director of the Virtual Embodiment Lab in that department.  Her research focuses on creating novel embodiment experiences in virtual environments by tracking and transforming user behavior, with particular emphasis on the clinical and collaborative applications.  She received her Ph.D. in Communication from Stanford University, working in the Virtual Human Interaction Lab.

This talk is open to all. Lunch will be served. Metered parking is available in the Botanic Gardens lot across the road from Beebe Hall. No registration or RSVP required except for groups of 5 or more. We ask that larger groups email Patty at pmt6@cornell.edu letting us know of your plans to attend so that we can order enough lunch.

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Spring 2017 Talks at Twelve


This semester we welcome speakers from across campus and across the U.S. for our spring 2017 Talks at Twelve series. Talks at Twelve are held in the Beebe Hall second floor conference room and lunch is served. These talks are free and open to all. No RSVP or registration is required, but notice is appreciated if a larger group is planning to attend (email pmt6@cornell.edu).

Wednesday, February 22, 12:00-1:00pm
Mental and Behavioral Health Facilities: Critical Research and Design Recommendations
Mardelle M. Shepley, Design and Environmental Analysis, Cornell University

comfortTuesday, March 7, 12:00-1:00pm
Beyond the Peer-Reviewed Article: Making Research Relevant for Community Stakeholders and Policymakers
Megan Comfort, Behavioral Health and Criminal Justice Research Division, Research Triangle Institute

Thursday, March 16, 12:00-1:00pm
Pain and Presence: The Clinical Use of Media
Andrea Stevenson Won, Communication, Cornell University

Thursday, April 13, 12:00-1:00pm
Healthy Base Initiative: Evaluating Programs to Encourage Healthy Eating, Active Lifestyles, and Tobacco-Free Living
Marney Thomas, BCTR, Cornell University

Thursday, April 20, 12:00-1:00pm
Data Driven Policy-Making in Child Welfare
Dana Weiner, Chapin Hall Center for Children, University of Chicago

Tuesday, April 25, 12:00-1:00pm
Weill Cornell Behavioral Geriatrics: Cognitive Impairment in Hospitalized Adults & Palliative & Mental Health Care
Elissa Kozlov and Keiko Kurita, Weill Cornell Medical College

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Talks at Twelve: Elissa Kozlov and Keiko Kurita, Tuesday, April 25, 2017

 
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Weill Cornell Behavioral Geriatrics: "Cognitive Impairment in Hospitalized Adults" and "Palliative and Mental Health Care"
Elissa Kozlov and Keiko Kurita, Weill Cornell Medical College

Tuesday, April 25, 2017
12:00-1:00 PM
Beebe Hall, 2nd floor conference room



Palliative and Mental Health Care: Psychological Needs of Patients and their Families
Palliative care is interdisciplinary care that improves the quality of life of patients with life-threatening illness and their families by addressing physical, psychosocial, practical and spiritual issues. Though psychosocial care is a core component of palliative care, it is unclear what psychological interventions and assessments are being provided to patients in palliative care. Dr. Elissa Kozlov will discuss the current state of mental health care and research within palliative care.

Dr. Elissa Kozlov is a T32 post-doctoral fellow at Weill Cornell Medical College at the Center for End-of-Life Research. She earned her doctorate from Washington University in both Clinical and Aging and Developmental Psychology. Her research focuses on mental health assessment and intervention within palliative care, patient and family knowledge of palliative care, later life family communication, and barriers to palliative care integration and utilization.

Cognitive Impairment in Hospitalized  Adults
As the population ages, increasing age is associated with cognitive decline which may adversely affect the outcomes of older adults managing complex illnesses, especially during hospitalization. In her presentation, Keiko will explore the extent compromises in cognitive function may be associated with preferences, decisions, and care in older adults who are seriously ill and describe further research. 57

Keiko Kurita is a T32 post-doctoral associate in Behavioral Geriatrics at Weill Cornell Medical College’s Division of Geriatrics and Palliative Medicine. She received her PhD in Psychology  and MPH from the University of Southern California. Keiko’s research is focused on understanding how declines in cognitive function and the treatment of chronic illnesses interact with one another and using this knowledge to improve the psychological well-being of older adults. words:68

This talk is open to all. Lunch will be served. Metered parking is available in the Botanic Gardens lot across the road from Beebe Hall. No registration or RSVP required except for groups of 5 or more. We ask that larger groups email Patty at pmt6@cornell.edu letting us know of your plans to attend so that we can order enough lunch.

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Talks at Twelve: Dana Weiner, Thursday, April 20, 2017

 
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Data-Driven Policy Making in Child Welfare
Dana Weiner, Chapin Hall Center for Children, University of Chicago

Thursday, April 20, 2017
12:00-1:00 PM
Beebe Hall, 2nd floor conference room



Dr. Weiner will address the challenges and opportunities associated with using data and research evidence to inform decision making in public policy.  Based on her extensive experience working within and around child welfare jurisdictions to innovate practice, align policy, and implement programs, her talk will identify key strategies for successfully incorporating new knowledge into service delivery in ways that are meaningful for leadership, staff, and (most importantly) the children and families served by these systems.  This discussion will include vivid examples of policy questions and the empirical answers that may guide innovation, as well as a discussion of the hazards and costs of uninformed policy decision making.

Dana Weiner is a policy fellow at the Chapin Hall Center for Children at the University of Chicago, where she provides analytic consultation and policy guidance to child welfare jurisdictions across the country.  Dr. Weiner teaches Data for Policy Analysis and Management to master's students at the University of Chicago, School of Social Service Administration, and her research has focused on quantifying resource accessibility - analyzing the role of geospatial relationships in child welfare systems - and on evaluating the implementation of evidence-based models in child welfare and juvenile justice contexts.

This talk is open to all. Lunch will be served. Metered parking is available in the Botanic Gardens lot across the road from Beebe Hall. No registration or RSVP required except for groups of 5 or more. We ask that larger groups email Patty at pmt6@cornell.edu letting us know of your plans to attend so that we can order enough lunch.

(0) Comments.  |   Tags: BCTR Talks at Twelve    children    policy    translational research   

Talks at Twelve: Marney Thomas and Brian Leidy, Thursday, April 13, 2017

 
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Healthy Base Initiative: Evaluating Programs to Encourage Healthy Eating, Active Lifestyles, and Tobacco-Free Living
Marney Thomas and Brian Leidy, BCTR

Thursday, April 13, 2017
12:00-1:00 PM
Beebe Hall, 2nd floor conference room



From 2014 to 2015 the Military Projects staff, collaborating with the Department of Defense and other university partners, undertook an evaluation of the Healthy Base Initiative, a pilot demonstration of multiple evidence-based programs at 14 military installations across all services. Cornell’s task was to contact the target audiences at the end of the implementation period and determine their awareness of and engagement in the programs and note any changes in their eating, exercising, and smoking behaviors. Thomas and Leidy will share lessons learned in their joint presentation about the challenges and successes of evaluating a multi-site, multi-program project.

Healthy Base Initiative final report

Marney Thomas, Ph.D., is a senior extension associate and the former director of the Military Projects (1991-2009).

Brian D. Leidy, Ph.D., is a senior extension associate in the BCTR.  He is the director of the Military Projects, assisting military family support programs in the Army, Army Reserve, and Department of Defense with needs assessment, program evaluation, and research studies of programs and services offered to service members and their families.

This talk is open to all. Lunch will be served. Metered parking is available in the Botanic Gardens lot across the road from Beebe Hall. No registration or RSVP required except for groups of 5 or more. We ask that larger groups email Patty at pmt6@cornell.edu letting us know of your plans to attend so that we can order enough lunch.

(0) Comments.  |   Tags: BCTR Talks at Twelve    Brian Leidy    health    Marney Thomas    military    Military Projects   

Talks at Twelve: Megan Comfort, Tuesday, March 7, 2017

 
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Beyond the Peer-Reviewed Article: Making Research Relevant for Community Stakeholders and Policymakers
Megan Comfort, Research Triangle Institute

Tuesday, March 7, 2017
12:00-1:00 PM
Beebe Hall, 2nd floor conference room



In an era of “alternative facts” and widespread activism, it is more important than ever for people in academic spheres to make research accessible, understandable, and usable outside of the Ivory Tower.  The tools available for doing so are vast – policy brief, fact sheets, in-person report-backs, social media posts, and more – and thus require thoughtfulness about the intended audience and the purpose of dissemination.  This talk will provide examples of strategies developed to communicate research findings to study participants, community stakeholders, and policymakers, highlighting the strengths of each and reflecting on the responsibilities of researchers to foster dialogue with people affected by their work.

Megan Comfort is a senior research sociologist in the Research Triangle Institute's International’s Behavioral Health and Criminal Justice research division.  Her areas of expertise include families and incarceration, HIV prevention, and health inequities among urban poor populations.  She is the author of Doing Time Together: Love and Family in the Shadow of the Prison (University of Chicago Press, 2008).  She also is a member of the Scholars Strategy Network, an advisory board member for Essie Justice Group (a non-profit organization that empowers women with incarcerated loved ones), and serves on the board of UnCommon Law (a non-profit organization that provides legal representation for people serving life sentences).

This talk is open to all. Lunch will be served. Metered parking is available in the Botanic Gardens lot across the road from Beebe Hall. No registration or RSVP required except for groups of 5 or more. We ask that larger groups email Patty at pmt6@cornell.edu letting us know of your plans to attend so that we can order enough lunch.

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Talks at Twelve: Mardelle Shepley, Wednesday, February 22, 2017

 
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Mental and Behavioral Health Facilities: Critical Research and Design Recommendations
Mardelle Shepley, Design and Environmental Analysis, Cornell

Wednesday, February 22, 2017
12:00-1:00 PM
Beebe Hall, 2nd floor conference room



Research on the design of mental and behavioral health facilities is available but limited, although the shortcomings of these facilities are well-known. Dr. Mardelle Shepley will describe design features that are believed to positively impact staff, patients, and families in psychiatric environments and provide information related to their presence in existing facilities. Her research project involved both qualitative and quantitative methods. Dr. Shepley will share results involving a variety of topics including the appropriateness of private rooms, deinstitutionalization, access to nature, and open nursing station design. She will also provide guidelines for mental and behavioral health facilities.

Mardelle Shepley is a professor in the Department of Design and Environmental Analysis and associate director of the Institute for Healthy Futures. She serves on the graduate field faculty in the Department of Architecture. A fellow in the American Institute of Architects, she has authored/co-authored six books, including Healthcare Environments for Children and their Families (1998), A Practitioner’s Guide to Evidence-based Design (2008), Design for Critical Care (2009), Health Facility Evaluation for Design Practitioners (2010), Design for Pediatric and Neonatal Critical Care (2014) and Design for Mental and Behavioral Health (2017).

This talk is open to all. Lunch will be served. Metered parking is available in the Botanic Gardens lot across the road from Beebe Hall. No registration or RSVP required except for groups of 5 or more. We ask that larger groups email Patty at pmt6@cornell.edu letting us know of your plans to attend so that we can order enough lunch.