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Spring 2018 Talks at Twelve


This semester we welcome speakers from across campus and across the U.S. for our spring 2018 Talks at Twelve series.

Talks at Twelve are held in the Beebe Hall second floor conference room and lunch is served. These talks are free and open to all. No RSVP or registration is required, but notice is appreciated if a larger group is planning to attend (email lb274@cornell.edu).

Tuesday, February 6, 12:00-1:00pm

Headshots of Genevieve Meredith, Amelia Greiner Safi, and Alexander Travis

Genevieve Meredith, Amelia Greiner Safi, and Alexander Travis

A New Paradigm for Public Health Training at Cornell
Genevieve Meredith, Master of Public Health Program; Department of Population Medicine, Cornell University
Amelia Greiner Safi, Master of Public Health Program; Department of Communication, Cornell University
Alexander Travis, Master of Public Health Program; Department of Biomedical Sciences, Cornell University

Thursday, March 22, 12:00-1:00pm

headshot of James GarbarinoMiller's Children: Why Giving Teenage Killers a Second Chance Matters for All of Us
James Garbarino, Psychology Department, Loyola University Chicago

Thursday, April 19, 12:00-1:00pm

Headshot of Elizabeth Day

Bridging Policy and Social Science: How Legislators Describe Their Use of Research in Policymaking
Elizabeth Day, BCTR, Cornell University

Wednesday, May 2, 12:00-1:00pm

headshots of Heather Derry and Elizabeth Luth

Heather Derry and Elizabeth Luth

Weill Cornell Behavioral Geriatrics: “Assessing and Enhancing Mental Health” and “Race Disparities in End-of-Life Care”
Heather Derry, Behavioral Geriatrics and Palliative Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College
Elizabeth Luth, Behavioral Geriatrics and Palliative Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College

Thursday, May 17, 12:00-1:00pm

Headshot of Neil A. Lewis, Jr.Psychology of Stratification: How Social Position Influences Meaning Making, Motivation, & Behavior
Neil A. Lewis, Jr., Department of Communication, Cornell University

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Talks at Twelve: Heather Derry and Elizabeth Luth, Wednesday, May 2, 2018

 
portraits of Heather Derry and Elizabeth Luth

Two talks by Behavioral Geriatrics and Palliative Medicine postdocs
Heather Derry and Elizabeth Luth, Behavioral Geriatrics and Palliative Medicine Weill Cornell Medical College

Wednesday, May 2, 2018
12:00-1:00 PM
Beebe Hall, 2nd floor conference room



Stress and Cognition in Clinical Discussions:  Exploring the Impact on Prognostic Understanding for Advanced Cancer Patients
Heather Derry, PhD, T32 Postdoctoral Fellow, Behavioral Geriatrics and Palliative Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College

For patients with advanced cancer, clinical discussions about prognosis can be stressful.  In addition, patients’ prognostic understanding is often limited, which presents challenges for informed decision-making.  Laboratory-based research provides insight into the ways that stress influences our physical, emotional, and cognitive responses.  Heather will discuss how these responses may interface with clinical discussions in the context of advanced cancer, and future studies to assess the impact of stress and emotion on patients’ understanding of their illness.

Understanding Race Disparities in End-of-Life Care for Patients Living with Dementia
Elizabeth Luth, PhD, T32 Postdoctoral Fellow, Behavioral Geriatrics and Palliative Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College

Research documents racial and ethnic disparities in end-of-life (EOL) care, where patients from racial and ethnic minority groups receive more aggressive, burdensome care, and have less access to quality-of-life promoting care at EOL. However, disparities in EOL care are not well understood for the growing population of patients with dementia. Elizabeth will share results from two recent studies of race, dementia, advance care planning, and assessments of EOL care quality and how those findings link to her current research on racial and ethnic differences in terminal hospital care and unfavorable hospice outcomes for patients with dementia.

portrait of Heather DerryHeather Derry is a T32 postdoctoral associate in Behavioral Geriatrics at Weill Cornell Medicine’s Division of Geriatrics and Palliative Medicine.  She completed her PhD in psychology at the Ohio State University, where her dissertation work evaluated how physical fitness impacts cognitive function among post-surgery breast cancer survivors.  She also completed a clinical health psychology internship at the Louis Stokes Cleveland VA, with training emphases in geropsychology, primary care mental health integration, and women's addictions treatment.  Heather’s graduate-level research focused on the behavioral and physiological connections between stress, lifestyle factors, and health.  Her current work aims to assess mental health symptoms in seriously ill medical patients during and following hospital discharge, with the goal of enhancing post-discharge mental and physical health.

portrait of Elizabeth LuthElizabeth Luth is a T32 postdoctoral associate in Behavioral Geriatrics and Palliative Medicine at Weill Cornell Medicine. She completed her PhD in sociology at Rutgers University.  Elizabeth's graduate research focused on social and demographic disparities in assessments of end-of-life care quality for deceased older adults. At Weill Cornell, she is extending this work by investigating racial and ethnic disparities in quality of care for patients with advanced dementia near the end of life.


Lunch will be served. Metered parking is available in the Botanic Gardens lot across the road from Beebe Hall. No registration or RSVP required except for groups of 5 or more. We ask that larger groups email Lori Biechele at lb274@cornell.edu letting us know of your plans to attend so that we can order enough lunch.

(1) Comment.  |   Tags: aging    BCTR Talks at Twelve    gerontology    health    healthcare    mental health    race    Weill Cornell   

Talks at Twelve: Neil A. Lewis, Jr., Thursday, May 17, 2018

Tags: BCTR Talks at Twelve,   education,   race,  
 
portrait of Neil A. Lewis, Jr.

Psychology of Stratification: How Social Position Influences Meaning Making, Motivation, & Behavior
Neil A. Lewis, Jr., Cornell University

Thursday, May 17, 2018
12:00-1:00 PM
Beebe Hall, 2nd floor conference room



People, across backgrounds, aspire to attain high levels of education and to live healthy lives. Examinations of population-level data reveal, however, that those who are situated in lower positions in the social hierarchy (e.g., low-income and racial-ethnic minority people) are less likely to attain those aspirations than their higher-status counterparts. Why are the gaps between aspiration and attainment larger for some groups than for others? In this talk Lewis will present studies from a program of research examining how the interplay between people’s social contexts and identities influence the gaps between aspirations and attainment of educational and health goals. Specifically, he will discuss how social stratification shapes the meaning people make of their experiences, and the downstream consequences of those meaning-making processes for motivation and behavior. He will end by discussing the implications of this research for interventions to reduce aspiration-attainment gaps, and social disparities more broadly.

Neil A. Lewis, Jr. is an assistant professor of communication and social behavior at Cornell University with graduate field appointments in communication and psychology. He is also a faculty affiliate of the Cornell Center for the Study of Inequality and Roper Center for Public Opinion Research, and a fellow of the Dornsife Center for the Mind and Society at the University of Southern California. Prior to his current position, Neil was the interim director of the Preparation Initiative Program in the Ross School of Business at the University of Michigan, and was a fellow at the International Max Planck Research School on the Life Course. Neil is a first-generation college graduate; he earned his B.A. in economics and psychology at Cornell University, and his M.S. and Ph.D. in social psychology at the University of Michigan.
Neil’s research focuses on how the interplay between social identity and social contexts shape motivation and goal-pursuit processes. He uses this framework to understand social disparities, particularly disparities in education and health outcomes. His research has been published in journals such as the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, Psychological Science, Psychological Inquiry, Contemporary Educational Psychology, and Social Issues and Policy Review, and has been featured in outlets such as The Wall Street Journal, The Atlantic, Forbes Magazine, and Business Insider.


Lunch will be served. Metered parking is available in the Botanic Gardens lot across the road from Beebe Hall. No registration or RSVP required except for groups of 5 or more. We ask that larger groups email Lori Biechele at lb274@cornell.edu letting us know of your plans to attend so that we can order enough lunch.

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Talks at Twelve: Elizabeth Day, Thursday, April 19, 2018

 
portrait of Elizabeth Day

Bridging Policy and Social Science: How Legislators Describe Their Use of Research in Policymaking
Elizabeth Day, Cornell University

Thursday, April 19, 2018
12:00-1:00 PM
Beebe Hall, 2nd floor conference room



Rigorous research and public policy ought to go hand-in-hand; if policymaking were based on hard evidence and dispassionate analysis, it could create the conditions for improving the lives of children, youth, and families. Yet a gap persists in the use of social science to inform public policy in the United States, which may be due, in part, to a lack of understanding as to how legislators utilize research evidence throughout the policy process. Based on in-depth interviews of over 200 state legislators, this presentation explores the uses of research in policymaking based on the unique perspectives of policymakers themselves, with a particular focus on youth and family issues. Implications for research and practice, as well as advice to academics, will also be discussed.

Elizabeth Day is a postdoctoral fellow for Cornell Project 2Gen in the Bronfenbrenner Center for Translational Research. Her research focuses on bridging research and policy, with a particular focus on adolescent well-being and family policy at the state level. She received her Ph.D. in Human Development and Family Studies and Graduate Certificate in Social Policy from Purdue University. Prior to joining the BCTR, Elizabeth was a Society for Research in Child Development Congressional Policy Fellow in the Office of U.S. Senator Kirsten Gillibrand (NY).


Lunch will be served. Metered parking is available in the Botanic Gardens lot across the road from Beebe Hall. No registration or RSVP required except for groups of 5 or more. We ask that larger groups email Lori Biechele at lb274@cornell.edu letting us know of your plans to attend so that we can order enough lunch.

(0) Comments.  |   Tags: BCTR Talks at Twelve    children    Cornell Project 2Gen    Elizabeth Day    family    policy    youth   

Talks at Twelve: James Garbarino, Thursday, March 22, 2018

 
portrait of James Garbarino

Miller's Children: Why Giving Teenage Killers a Second Chance Matters for All of Us
James Garbarino, Loyola University Chicago

Thursday, March 22, 2018
12:00-1:00 PM
Ten-Eyck Room, Nevin Welcome Center, Cornell Botanic Gardens



Are teenage killers doomed to a life of violence? The Supreme Court said “no” in the case of Miller v. Alabama, ruling they are “less guilty by reason of adolescence,” and thus exempted from mandatory life-without-parole sentences (except for the “rarest cases” of “permanent incorrigibility”). This has made thousands of men (and some women) eligible for re-sentencing hearings around the country. Garbarino explores the issues of education, maturation, psychological intervention, and spiritual development that drive the rehabilitation and transformation central to these cases. The presentation is based upon his work as a psychological expert witness in more than 40 “Miller” cases, as reported in his 2018 book Miller’s Children, in which he brings to bear developmental psychology and modern neuroscience.

James Garbarino holds the Maude Clarke Chair in Psychology and was founding director of the Center for the Human Rights of Children at Loyola University Chicago. Since 1994, he has served as a scientific expert witness in murder cases. Among the books he has authored are: Miller’s Children: Why Giving Teenage Killers a Second Chance Matters for All of Us (2018) and Listening to Killers (2015). He has received the American Psychological Association’s Award for Distinguished Professional Contributions to Public Service and the Paul Fink Interpersonal Violence Prevention Award from the National Partnership to End Interpersonal Violence, among other awards.


Book signing in the garden shop on the first floor of the Nevin Welcome Center to immediately follow lunch

Lunch will immediately follow the talk. No registration or RSVP required except for groups of 5 or more. We ask that larger groups email Lori Biechele at lb274@cornell.edu letting us know of your plans to attend so that we can order enough lunch.

Metered parking is available in the Botanic Gardens lot.

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Talks at Twelve: Genevive Meredith, Amelia Greiner Safi, Alexander Travis, Tuesday, February 6, 2018

 

A New Paradigm for Public Health Training at Cornell
Genevieve Meredith, Amelia Safi, and Alexander Travis, Cornell University

Tuesday, February 6, 2018
12:00-1:00 PM
Beebe Hall, 2nd floor conference room



In the fall of 2017, Cornell launched for the first time a Master of Public Health Program, building on a rich tradition of public health research and teaching across its many Colleges and Schools. Locally and globally we are facing complex and urgent public health needs, due in part to accelerating environmental change and social divides. To prepare public health leaders of the future—leaders who ensure the health of current and future populations—student trainees must be equipped to understand and act upon the inextricable, dynamic links between human health and the environment’s health. The new Master of Public Health training program aligns with recently-transformed national accreditation criteria designed to maximize the public health impact of its graduates. Our program is founded on the planetary health paradigm, with guiding principles of sustainability, equity, engagement, and applied research and practice.

portrait of Genevieve MeredithGen Meredith (OTR, MPH) is associate director of the Master of Public Health (MPH) Program and a lecturer in the Department of Population Medicine. For the last 14 years, Gen has worked globally to help build capacity of the public health workforce, and to optimize public health systems to achieve improved health outcomes. Leveraging expertise gained from leading large international development projects in Africa and the Caribbean, and local and state public health programs in the U.S., Gen came to Cornell to help design and lead the MPH program, focusing specifically on engaged learning and applied practice for public health competence development. As an engaged scholar, Gen is also developing and facilitating community-centered courses, and co-leading community-based action research projects in the Southern Tier.

portrait of Amelia Greiner SafiDr. Amelia Greiner Safi is an applied social scientist with an interest in the intersection of public health, environmental/ecological health, policy and communication. She holds a joint appointment between the Department of Communication and the Master of Public Health Program.  She has often served as a bridge across disciplines and professions to find common interests in order to advance health and environmental outcomes. Recently, she has been involved with providing insight from the social and behavioral sciences to a convening of the Rockefeller/Lancet partnership to advance the field of Planetary Health. She is the Project Director for an NIH/FDA grant on vulnerable adults’ and youth reactions to graphic warning labels on tobacco products.

portrait of Alexander TravisAlexander J. Travis (VMD, PhD) is director of the MPH Program and a professor in the Department of Biomedical Sciences. Alex received his AB from Princeton University and his VMD and PhD at the University of Pennsylvania. He is associate dean of international programs and public health at the College of Veterinary Medicine, and is founding director of Cornell’s Master of Public Health program. In addition to his NIH-funded biomedical research laboratory that focuses on health diagnostics, Alex takes a broad, planetary health approach in his field research, driven by a passion to advance human health at the population level in ways that promote biodiversity conservation. Alex seeks to have impact by training students to design, implement, and test public health interventions that are equitable and sustainable for people and the planet.


Lunch will be served. Metered parking is available in the Botanic Gardens lot across the road from Beebe Hall. No registration or RSVP required except for groups of 5 or more. We ask that larger groups email Lori Biechele at lb274@cornell.edu letting us know of your plans to attend so that we can order enough lunch.

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Fall 2017 Talks at Twelve


In the fall semester the BCTR presents talks from our visiting scholar Peter Lloyd-Sherlock as well as Monika Safford of Weill Cornell and Paul Krause from eCornell. All Talks at Twelve are held in the Beebe Hall second floor conference room and lunch is served. These talks are free and open to all.

No RSVP or registration is required, but notice is appreciated if a larger group is planning to attend (email pmt6@cornell.edu).

lloyd-sherlock-mailchimpWednesday, October 1, 12:00-1:00pm
Researching Unregulated Residential Care Homes in Argentina
Peter Lloyd-Sherlock, Social Policy & International Development, University of East Anglia

safford-mailchimpThursday, November 30, 12:00-1:00pm
The Cornell Center for Health Equity
Monika M. Safford, General Internal Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College

krause-mailchimpThursday, December 7, 12:00-1:00pm
Online Learning: Examples and Opportunities
Paul Krause, eCornell, Cornell University

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Talks at Twelve: Paul Krause, Thursday, December 7, 2017

 

Online Learning: Examples and Opportunities
Paul Krause, eCornell

Thursday, December 7, 2017
12:00-1:00 PM
Beebe Hall, 2nd floor conference room



Online learning presents important opportunities to innovate and to reach new students around the world. We’ll review approaches to online learning and clarify commonly used - and often confused terms like “asynchronous,” “synchronous,” “self-paced,” “expert led,” and “MOOCs.” We’ll look at online course examples and ways to combine different instructional components to build an engaging, multi-faceted learning experience. Lastly, we’ll share some lessons learned and best practices for online course development, and resources available at Cornell University to help you to take the next step.

Paul Krause serves as the CEO of eCornell and the associate vice provost for online learning at Cornell University. Paul is responsible for eCornell and collaborating with the senior leadership of the university and its faculty to facilitate online learning innovation and growth. Paul was formerly the CEO of Element K, an online learning company based in Rochester, NY. He grew Element K into a leading online learning provider before it was acquired by Skillsoft. He also co-founded Matrix Insights, an online platform for personalized leadership development. He holds an MBA from the University of Rochester and a BS from Cornell University.

Lunch will be served. Metered parking is available in the Botanic Gardens lot across the road from Beebe Hall. No registration or RSVP required except for groups of 5 or more. We ask that larger groups email Patty at pmt6@cornell.edu letting us know of your plans to attend so that we can order enough lunch.

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Talks at Twelve: Monika M. Safford, Thursday, November 30, 2017

 
safford

Health Equity in the 21st Century: Challenges and Solutions
Monika M. Safford

Thursday, November 30, 2017
12:00-1:00 PM
Beebe Hall, 2nd floor conference room



Throughout her distinguished career as a clinician-investigator with clinical expertise in preventive healthcare, treatment of acute and chronic illness, and the coordination of care for those with complex diseases, Dr. Monika Safford is recognized as an expert in patient-centered research on diabetes, cardiovascular epidemiology and prevention, and health disparities. Over the course of conducting four trials in an underserved and largely African American region, the Alabama Black Belt, she has developed the concept of 'community partnered' research that shows promise as a strategy to eliminate inequities in health outcomes. In her talk, Dr. Safford will share how she developed this concept and how it will be operationalized as part of Cornell's new Center for Health Equity.

Dr. Monika Safford is the John J. Kulper Professor of Medicine in the Department of Medicine and the chief of the Division of General Internal Medicine at Weill Cornell Medical College. She is a clinician-investigator with clinical expertise in preventive healthcare, treatment of acute and chronic illness and the coordination of care for those with complex diseases. Dr. Safford previously served at University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) School of Medicine as the Inaugural Endowed Professor of Diabetes Prevention and Outcomes Research, Assistant Dean for Continuing Medical Education, Associate Director of the Center for Outcomes and Effectiveness Research and Education, and Co-Director of UAB's T32 Health Services and Comparative Effectiveness Research Training Program. She is an active principal investigator with ongoing support from the National Institutes of Health, Patient Centered Outcomes Research Institute, and industrial sources. Throughout her career as an educator, she has trained and mentored numerous medical students, graduate students, residents, fellows, and junior faculty members. She has chaired national meetings for the Society of General Internal Medicine and the American Diabetes Association for which she serves on a steering committee for an ISTEP medical education initiative and was Co-Chair of the ISTEP Writing Committee. Dr. Safford's honors include the American Association of Medical Colleges Learning Health System Research Pioneer Award (2013-14), a Gold Honor Society Humanism Program faculty mentor appointment (2012) and multiple awards for Research Excellence from UAB Department of Medicine, including the UAB Department of Medicine Max Cooper Award for Excellence in Research.

With more than 260 papers published in top tier journals, she is an expert in patient-centered research on diabetes, cardiovascular epidemiology and prevention, and health disparities. Among her published studies are noteworthy investigations on an underserved and largely African-American region called the Alabama Black Belt, where two-thirds of adults are obese and many have diabetes, hypertension or other chronic conditions. Dr. Safford has studied how health coaches and other non-traditional interventions affect patient outcomes, and was recently awarded a $10 million grant by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute of the National Institutes of Health to test two ways of improving the blood pressure of 2,000 people in the area.

Dr. Safford received her Bachelor of Arts degree from Dartmouth College and her Medical Degree from Weill Cornell. She completed her residency in internal medicine at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. Before joining the University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Medicine and the Birmingham Veterans Administration Medical Center in 2003, she earlier worked as an instructor of medicine at Brown University Medical School with a hospital appointment at The Miriam Hospital in Providence, Rhode Island; and the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, with a hospital appointment at the affiliated University Hospital.

Lunch will be served. Metered parking is available in the Botanic Gardens lot across the road from Beebe Hall. No registration or RSVP required except for groups of 5 or more. We ask that larger groups email Patty at pmt6@cornell.edu letting us know of your plans to attend so that we can order enough lunch.

(0) Comments.  |   Tags: BCTR Talks at Twelve    Cindy Enroth    health    race   

Talks at Twelve: Peter Lloyd-Sherlock, Wednesday, October 11, 2017

 

Researching Unregulated Residential Care Homes in Argentina
Peter Lloyd-Sherlock, University of East Anglia

Wednesday, October 11, 2017
12:00-1:00 PM
Beebe Hall, 2nd floor conference room



Residential long-term care is becoming increasingly widespread in low and middle-income countries. In 2010 it was estimated that Argentina contained 6,000 care homes for older people. Media reports often reveal poor quality care, in some cases amounting to abuses of residents’ human rights. Many care homes are unregulated, presenting a barrier to obtaining robust and systematic data on service quality. As part of a wider collaboration, Peter led a study to develop an innovative design for auditing residential care quality and applied it to a single Argentine city. His talk will focus on this innovative study design, with particular attention to related ethical challenges. He will present study findings and discuss wider implications for research on long-term care in similar settings.

Peter Lloyd-Sherlock is Professor of Social Policy and International Development at the University of East Anglia, UK. He is currently a visiting scholar at the Bronfenbrenner Center for Translational Research. Peter's research mainly relates to the health and wellbeing of older people in low- and middle-income countries, including secondments and advisory roles for a number of international agencies (most recently, World Health Organization, UN Women, and HelpAge International).

Lunch will be served. Metered parking is available in the Botanic Gardens lot across the road from Beebe Hall. No registration or RSVP required except for groups of 5 or more. We ask that larger groups email Patty at pmt6@cornell.edu letting us know of your plans to attend so that we can order enough lunch.

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