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Cornell Research Program on Self-Injury and Recovery

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Principal Investigator & Director: Janis Whitlock
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The CRPSIR is dedicated to advancing basic research and prevention knowledge related to self-injury behaviors, including non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) and suicide. Our research focuses on documenting basic epidemiological trends, contextual risk and protective factors, and recovery patterns. Our current work is focused on parental experiences of NSSI and the role of parent-child exchange in the recovery process and on understanding antecedents to psychological distress, including NSSI and suicide, in adolescents and young adults. We are also in the process of developing and evaluating interventions for early detection and prevention in community and therapeutic settings.Our focus on research is matched by a commitment to translating research into usable knowledge for parents, youth-serving professionals, individuals with self-injury experience, medical professionals, and others with an interest in NSSI. Research dissemination takes place through practice-based research reviews, suggested protocols, brief power point presentations, and filmed informational segments. The CRPSIR team also provides a range of consulting services for youth-serving professionals, school personnel, and medical professionals seeking to understand, intervene, and/or treat self-injury in adolescent and young adult populations.

Our focus on research is matched by a dedication to translating research into usable knowledge for parents, youth-serving professionals, individuals with self-injury experience, medical professionals, and others with an interest in NSSI. Research dissemination takes place through practice-based research reviews, suggested protocols, brief power point presentations, and filmed informational segments. The CRPSIR team also provides a range of consulting services for youth-serving professionals, school personnel, and medical professionals seeking to understand, intervene, and/or treat self-injury in adolescent and young adult populations.